Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

It's the strongest, tersest form of negative. It always follows a plain form verb. I have no idea of the origin; it's pretty old though:) Regarding the origin, it goes back to at least the 8th century in this form: 活用語の終止形に付いて、「~するな」と禁止する意をあらわす。現代口語に継承されている。 大和道は雲隠れたりしかれども吾が振る袖をなめしと思ふな(万葉集、筑紫娘子) こちふかば匂ひおこせよ梅の花あるじなしとて春を忘るな(拾遺集、菅原道真) Source: ...


7

This may not be the "standard" way to use な, but I don't see anything particularly wrong with it, especially considering how it can shorten titles and save space. JAPANなニュース and ニュースな英語 sound better than JAPANに関するニュース and ニュースに出てくる英語, don't they? For a more extreme example of this non-standard な, you can look at the way Yui Horie signs off of her weekly ...


7

The particles ね and な have several different uses, but one is to turn a statement into a tag question. For example: あの子はたけしです (That child is Takeshi) / あの子はたけしですね? (That child is Takeshi, right?) パーティは明日だ (The party is tomorrow) / パーティは明日だな? (The party is tomorrow, right?) For this usage: ね is more formal and more feminine な is more informal and more ...


5

You're right, this is a form of だ. You're probably used to seeing な following na-adjectives. It can be considered the form of だ that appears before nouns: キレイだ    ←  Here, だ ends a clause. キレイな花   ←  Here, だ changes to な before the noun 花. But when だ follows a regular noun, it typically doesn't take the な form. The main exception is when it ...


4

It's the Prohibition particle If na follows a dictionary form verb, it is a negative command ("Don't... "). However, if used with a verb stem, it implies the opposite: "Do..."


3

It is from なる, in a way; but it may not be the one you're thinking of. The なる here is the 連体形 of the former copula なり, which itself derives from に+あり (modern ある). This seems to have been the copula as far back as we have records of. Indeed, this kind of adjective is younger than the copula it uses - these kinds of adjectives do not occur before the ...


3

As others have noted, the modern な particle used with -na adjectives evolved from なる, itself not the verb なる "to become", but instead a contraction of にある "to be in a state". So from newest form to oldest, using your example of きれい, we would have: 綺麗な女 綺麗なる女 綺麗にある女 The -naru form is still used in modern poetry and other contexts to give things a ...


3

By popular demand: That's not the negative imperative particle. Rather, it's an abbreviation of なさい, probably via the elided form なはい or なあ. See here. It's colloquial and standard (meaning everyone understands what it means). Your observation that it's a bit patronising is probably correct—notice that なさい has similar connotations—but I'm not a usage ...


3

First, the two のに are completely different. 外が雪なのに気がついた。 そとが+雪+な+の+に気づく の is used to make a noun of the preceding proposition, so as to make the proposition the object of 気づく (object indicated by に). But then, a proposition cannot end with a noun, it must end with a verb, and 雪 is not a verb. The proposition is in fact そとが雪だ。 And when you put だ in ...


2

I think that there's some confusion in the types of そう in your sentences. In the first one (そうですね) the meaning is "It is so" or "I agree with you". It's used like this: A: さむいですね。(It's cold, isn't it?) B: そうですね。 (It is, isn't it.) In the second one, the そうだな (or そうだなぁ with a rising tone) can be used to mean "That looks/appears to be..." A: さむそうだな。 (It ...


1

As others have noted, な following the plain form of a verb is the abrupt command form for "don't [verb]". As far as the origin goes, this is the root of modern verb ending and adjective ない "not". Note that this negative な is decidedly not the same as the affirmative な used after a verb stem in the 連用形{れんようけい} continuative form (ending in -i or -e). That な ...


1

Using な in negative imperative 辞書形   + な 行く    + な -> 行くな   = don't go 食べる   + な ->食べるな = don't eat 遊びに行きなよ。(遊びに行きなさいという意味です) = let's go to play ケーキを食べなさいの意味はケーキを食べましょうと同じと思います。


1

な by itself does not indicate a tag question; it is used to add emotional emphasis to a sentence. However, it can be combined with か. 〜かな can generally be translated as "I wonder if ...". There's also the other, unrelated form of 〜な which forms a casual command to not do something. For example, 心配するな means "Don't worry".



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible