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10

I would say 日本で英語を教えたい。書道の勉強もしたい。 which literally means "I want to teach English in Japan. I want to do the study of calligraphy, too." You could also say 日本で英語を教えたい。書道も勉強したい。/ 書道も[習]{なら}いたい。 where も is replacing を. (書道をも is grammatically correct but sounds literary and/or archaic.) You're right that (1) 私も書道を勉強したい is like saying "Someone's ...


8

Both are 100% grammatical and natural-sounding, but since the two phrases are used in different situations/contexts, they are not interchangeable. 「犬{いぬ}と猫{ねこ}が好{す}き」 is said when "dogs and cats" have not specifically been mentioned between the speaker and listener. The best example of that situation would be when someone asks you the question: ...


7

Think about it like this: ピアニストです。 'is a pianist'    歌手です。 'is a singer' To negate this, we'll want to split です up into で+あります: ピアニストで あります。 'is a pianist'    歌手で あります。 'is a singer' Now we can negate あります and insert は to go with the negation: ピアニストでは ありません。 'is not a pianist'    歌手では ありません。 'is not a singer' To put these both ...


6

The も moves because 誰も is not a single word; it is two words. The も is the very same as in 私もそう思う. The combination of a question phrase and も becomes 'any~~~'; for example, you could say 誰のせい? Whose fault is it? Someone may answer 誰のせいでもない It's no one's fault. You may be familiar with ~ても 'even if'; combining this with a question word ...


5

These types of "why" questions are difficult to answer, but I would say that it was because the repetition makes the phrase sound emphatic both quickly and effectively. Interestingly enough, this is far from being a Japanese-only phenomenon. In English, one says "neither A nor B". The "n" sound is repeated. In French, it is "ni A ni B". In Japanese, we ...


5

Is there a major difference between ~だろうと and ~でも constructions in nuance? In nuance, no, not really. If anything, 「~だろうと」 would certainly sound more eloquent than 「~でも」. 「~でも」 could sound kind of blunt or unrefined when used to mean 「~だろうと」. Can ~だろうと only be used with question words? I've seen any volitional followed by と for an effect like ...


5

"犬と猫が好き" = "I like dogs and cats (among animals.)" A typical answer to the question "what kind of animals do you like?" "犬も猫も好き" = "I like both dogs and cats." A possible answer to the question "which do you like better, dogs or cats?"


4

This is one of those times when translating literally doesn't quite give you what you want. The sentence means something along the lines of "no matter what happens, it'll probably be fine." The 何 in this case is the "what" in question. 何かがあっても、大丈夫だろ is also grammatically correct (I think?), but it sounds a bit weird to me. That would basically be saying ...


4

Since most of Japanese Question + も patterns ("any- (... not)") are, as you know, only allowed to be used with negative predicates, we usually make some workarounds to express the "every-" idea. Unfortunately, the ways we've taken are not consistent across words, so maybe you're confused by it. any- (+ NEG) no matter - (regular) every- ...


4

Conceptually speaking でもあった is what you get by trying to combine だった and も (as in "also"). だった is a contraction of であった and you have to use the uncontracted form in order to insert も after で. So でもあった means "it also was". (In the non-past tense, the same thing happens: "だ + も = でもある".)


3

This question is really interesting. I never thought about it that way. First of all, I'd like to suggest 〜ところで as the equivalent conjunctive particle: いきなり言われたところでわからない (= いきなり言われても〜) 急に来られたところで会えない (= 急に来られても〜) ぜんぶ頼まれたところでできない (= ぜんぶ頼まれても〜) I tried to reverse engineer a catch-all translation that is better than even or although, and I think it's but: ...


2

Those two sentences show the most basic usage of the particle も. も is a marker which means "also". From Wikibooks (emphasis mine): The "also" marker も も is quite simply a marker that says "also". It replaces the particles は, が and を but can also follow other particles. This can also be used to form a large list of words all acting as though one of the ...


2

〜ても means "Even if X". In this case, "No matter what I do, Natto I cannot eat." 雨が降っても強行だ 走っても間に合わない 見つかったとしても壊れているに違いない 食べてもよい


2

How about thinking it's for avoiding ては? Which highlights いきなり, when the speaker would not know it either it's sudden or not.


1

Let's look at the definition of どうしても: どう努力【どりょく】してみても。 That is to say regardless of how hard (I) try. も here means regardless. It's part of a general pattern of ~(て/で)も, which has a general meaning of even if.



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