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7

わたしの父は中国語も英語も話せます。 My father can speak both Chinese and English. ~も~も is how you say "both ... and ..." in Japanese. It works with all particles, as も does by itself, i.e. usually replaces は, が, を and follows へ, に, etc. It also works with more than two も's, e.g. わたしの父は中国語も英語もドイツ語も話せます。 My father can speak (all of) Chinese, English and German. ...


5

That is not the [尊敬]{そんけい} usage of にも for at least three reasons. 1) 尊敬 (= "respect") is already expressed in the words [陛下]{へいか} and the お part of お[考]{かんが}え. 2) 「~~にも考えがある」 is a frequently-used set phrase in which the subject (the ~~ part) can be a first-person pronoun or even a murderer. 3) にも is used for 尊敬 only in highly limited situations, such as ...


5

Of course, 〜てもいい is not limited to borrowing, but rather any form of permission. Being very literal... エンピツを借りる "to borrow a pencil" エンピツを借りていい? "Is it okay if I borrow a pencil?" エンピツを借りてもいい? "Is it okay even if I borrow a pencil?" It is certainly not ungrammatical to have a も there (syntactically, you can insert any 係助詞{かかりじょし} between the て and ...


5

This でも means "〜 or something similar". So メシでも食べて means "eat some rice or something". The ででも in question is just the action-location-marker で plus the previous でも. So 舞台袖ででも大人しくして means "wait/behave quietly in the 舞台袖 (or somewhere)". (Not sure of the best translation for 舞台袖 -- literally the "wings of the stage", but maybe something like "off-stage" ...


3

でも not merely consists of で+も accidentally, it is a combination of で and も, and has then grown beyond the sum of its parts. Still, its meaning has not shifted completely, and so it should not be surprising that we can come across some phrases where both interpretations work. (Also それでも, it can be analyzed both ways.) Note that this is not the でも that can go ...


3

It's just a literal "this too" in the example you gave. 今の文学青年はセンチメンタルになることを怖れている。 This is what we're talking about. Young readers don't like to get too sentimental. This concept is what we're referring to in the next sentence with これ. これ(=センチメンタルになることを怖れていること)も傷つけられるのを怖れる一種のさもしい心のあらわれかも知れない。 So this idea of fearing the sentimental may be a ...


1

Short answer: と = and (giving an exhaustive list where you're enumerating everything) も = also (could be creating a new list or adding to an existing list) や = things like...and... (clearly only giving samples from the list) More detailed answer: I'll start by stealing one of my examples from whats the difference between し and と? ...


1

Okay, so looked this up, and it looks like this is an idiomatic expression of sorts as it doesn't seem to strictly follow the typical usage of the も particle. Typically も does indicate "also" something. Yet, something + もいいですか? seems to be the idiomatic way to say, "Can I do something" Likewise, something + もいいです。 would be the way to say, "You can do ...



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