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8

わたしの父は中国語も英語も話せます。 My father can speak both Chinese and English. ~も~も is how you say "both ... and ..." in Japanese. It works with all particles, as も does by itself, i.e. usually replaces は, が, を and follows へ, に, etc. It also works with more than two も's, e.g. わたしの父は中国語も英語もドイツ語も話せます。 My father can speak (all of) Chinese, English and German. ...


8

Let me shamelessly steal the explanation by sawa and an example by Chocolate to make up a slightly different explanation. も signifies that there are other things than the thing to which も is attached. It is sometimes used with けれど or a similar conjunctive, and in this case the thing to which も is attached is contrasted to something else, which is often ...


7

This でも means "〜 or something similar". So メシでも食べて means "eat some rice or something". The ででも in question is just the action-location-marker で plus the previous でも. So 舞台袖ででも大人しくして means "wait/behave quietly in the 舞台袖 (or somewhere)". (Not sure of the best translation for 舞台袖 -- literally the "wings of the stage", but maybe something like "off-stage" ...


7

That is not the [尊敬]{そんけい} usage of にも for at least three reasons. 1) 尊敬 (= "respect") is already expressed in the words [陛下]{へいか} and the お part of お[考]{かんが}え. 2) 「~~にも考えがある」 is a frequently-used set phrase in which the subject (the ~~ part) can be a first-person pronoun or even a murderer. 3) にも is used for 尊敬 only in highly limited situations, such as ...


7

も is used instead of が to add the meaning of "even" or "also." See for comparison the following examples: 日本ではクモを見ると良いことがあると言う人がいますよ In Japan, there are people who say that seeing a spider is a good thing. 日本ではクモを見ると良いことがあると言う人もいますよ In Japan, there are also people who say that seeing a spider is a good thing. Depending on context, one ...


7

Think about it like this: ピアニストです。 'is a pianist'    歌手です。 'is a singer' To negate this, we'll want to split です up into で+あります: ピアニストで あります。 'is a pianist'    歌手で あります。 'is a singer' Now we can negate あります and insert は to go with the negation: ピアニストでは ありません。 'is not a pianist'    歌手では ありません。 'is not a singer' To put these both ...


7

Both are 100% grammatical and natural-sounding, but since the two phrases are used in different situations/contexts, they are not interchangeable. 「犬{いぬ}と猫{ねこ}が好{す}き」 is said when "dogs and cats" have not specifically been mentioned between the speaker and listener. The best example of that situation would be when someone asks you the question: ...


5

食べる eat 食べない not eat 食べはしない not eat (but do drink) 食べもしない not even eat 食べすらしない not even so much as eat and so on わ as a sentence-ender is used differently in different dialects. With no context here (壊すわ) it's hard to say exactly, but in general, in the standard dialect, it's used for feminine emphasis. [edit] per the comment from blutorange, the ...


5

"犬と猫が好き" = "I like dogs and cats (among animals.)" A typical answer to the question "what kind of animals do you like?" "犬も猫も好き" = "I like both dogs and cats." A possible answer to the question "which do you like better, dogs or cats?"


5

Of course, 〜てもいい is not limited to borrowing, but rather any form of permission. Being very literal... エンピツを借りる "to borrow a pencil" エンピツを借りていい? "Is it okay if I borrow a pencil?" エンピツを借りてもいい? "Is it okay even if I borrow a pencil?" It is certainly not ungrammatical to have a も there (syntactically, you can insert any 係助詞{かかりじょし} between the て and ...


5

It's saying "There are even people who say..." Since it's not really the norm to think that spiders are a good thing, it's emphasizing that there are some who do think so. が would work fine as well, but the も gives it the emphasis that even though this thing is unexpected or in the minority, there are some people who take that side.


5

Adding も after で is possible and usual. See Particles で and も and でも. Adding でも after で is also possible, and ででも is not unseen, but the first で is often omitted.


4

Conceptually speaking でもあった is what you get by trying to combine だった and も (as in "also"). だった is a contraction of であった and you have to use the uncontracted form in order to insert も after で. So でもあった means "it also was". (In the non-past tense, the same thing happens: "だ + も = でもある".)


4

でも not merely consists of で+も accidentally, it is a combination of で and も, and has then grown beyond the sum of its parts. Still, its meaning has not shifted completely, and so it should not be surprising that we can come across some phrases where both interpretations work. (Also それでも, it can be analyzed both ways.) Note that this is not the でも that can go ...


4

The drought in Arizona has been going on for about fifteen years. So it's "this year too". The 連用形{れんようけい} ("continuative form") of a verb or adjective can be used like a conjunction without adding て. For an adjective, that is the 〜く form, and for a verb, it's the stem you add 〜ます to. Here you have the 連用形 of an adjective, not an adverb. It acts like ...


3

Since most of Japanese Question + も patterns ("any- (... not)") are, as you know, only allowed to be used with negative predicates, we usually make some workarounds to express the "every-" idea. Unfortunately, the ways we've taken are not consistent across words, so maybe you're confused by it. any- (+ NEG) no matter - (regular) every- ...


3

1) 「XもXでも」「XもYでも」is primarily used for emphasis. In English you might say, "I'll do it again and again!" Here, again is used twice to emphasize that you'll do it again. Similarly, in Japanese, 何度も何度でも, "Many many times, as many times (as it takes)", is repeated to emphasize the speaker's intention. 2) Primarily, emphasis will be lost. For example compare ...


3

It's 後で+も. The も serves to emphasize that it's speaking about after doing sports in particular or especially. This is the same も that goes into the construction of the -(verb)てもいい pattern. Think of (noun)で as the -て form of a noun (or adjectival).


3

It's just a literal "this too" in the example you gave. 今の文学青年はセンチメンタルになることを怖れている。 This is what we're talking about. Young readers don't like to get too sentimental. This concept is what we're referring to in the next sentence with これ. これ(=センチメンタルになることを怖れていること)も傷つけられるのを怖れる一種のさもしい心のあらわれかも知れない。 So this idea of fearing the sentimental may be a ...


3

Try looking at the sentence without that その10倍もの part, first: 人間の脳には、約140億の神経細胞と神経細胞を支持する細胞があります。 The sentence seems to be focusing on the following types of cells in the human brain: 神経細胞 and 神経細胞を支持する細胞 But the first type of cell has a numerical amount given: 約140億の. When the その10倍もの part is added before 神経細胞を支持する細胞, it seems to be building off of the ...


2

I believe the も basically just acts as emphasis. This is supported by weblio's definition of ても (連語): 「て」を強める意を表す。 You could think of 考えてごらん as "You should think about it.". It's a straightforward suggestion. By contrast, 考えてもごらん is "You should really, totally think about it, trust me, just do it!". ...But actually, I guess that only parallels one sort ...


2

Here でも means "even" or "also". Even a card is OK? Even in Nagoya (they) sell (them)?/ It's sold even in Nagoya? Depending on context it can also mean: It's also sold in Nagoya? see this example for reference: 群馬のある民宿でも売っています。 There is a lodge in Gunma that also sells them.


2

It can be loosely translated to "even". で is "with", and も is "also", so you put them together and makes "also with", or "even with"...but we generally wouldn't say that in English, so it becomes "even": "You can even pay by card".


2

Short answer: と = and (giving an exhaustive list where you're enumerating everything) も = also (could be creating a new list or adding to an existing list) や = things like...and... (clearly only giving samples from the list) More detailed answer: I'll start by stealing one of my examples from whats the difference between し and と? ...


2

〜ても means "Even if X". In this case, "No matter what I do, Natto I cannot eat." 雨が降っても強行だ 走っても間に合わない 見つかったとしても壊れているに違いない 食べてもよい


1

Let's look at the definition of どうしても: どう努力【どりょく】してみても。 That is to say regardless of how hard (I) try. も here means regardless. It's part of a general pattern of ~(て/で)も, which has a general meaning of even if.


1

It seems to be closest to 《接続助詞「に」+係助詞「も」》, using 大辞泉's second meaning for も as a 係助詞: ② 他にも類似の事物が存在することを言外にほのめかす形で,ある事物を提示する。 To apply this definition here, I would say the も is emphasizing the otherness of His Majesty - intimating that it might not be the idea the speaker would have, but His Majesty has his own ideas.


1

Okay, so looked this up, and it looks like this is an idiomatic expression of sorts as it doesn't seem to strictly follow the typical usage of the も particle. Typically も does indicate "also" something. Yet, something + もいいですか? seems to be the idiomatic way to say, "Can I do something" Likewise, something + もいいです。 would be the way to say, "You can do ...



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