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7

In a sense, yes, but に is the correct choice here. 受ける takes two objects, a "direct" and an "indirect" object. を marks the direct object, i.e. what is being received に marks the indirect object, i.e. from whom the direct object is being received を will not be translated at all, and に will be translated as "from". から, too, often means "from" but applies ...


7

This question is trickier than it may appear to many J-learners and here is why. OP's first sentence means what s/he stated in English NOT only because 「て」 was used but also because the two activities happen to be those that could not take place simultaneously -- "brush teeth" and "eat". 「て」 can certainly signify the sequence of activities, but it can also ...


7

時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 時間がありませんでしたからパーティーに行きませんでした。 While the second one is relatively a bit politer than the first, neither of these are very casual nor polite. If you said these directly to the host of the party, the host would probably feel offended. If you said these to your close friend, he/she would feel that the "~でした" part is ...


7

Both sentences have minor issues even though they may be considered good in Japanese as a foreign language. At least, both are grammatical. 「から」 actually sounds more casual/informal than many J-learners seem to think. That is the impression that I get from speaking to them. The more formal words with the same meaning would be 「ので」 and 「ため/ために」. With ...


6

There is a fairly big and important difference between the two that makes it impossible for us to use them interchangeably all the time. 「AからBまで」 means "from A through B" when both Point A and Point B are defined clearly and precisely without hinting at a possible range either temporally or spatially. 「9[時]{じ}から15時までアルバイトをしています。」 = "I work part-time ...


6

ご飯を食べてから一緒に公園で/をさんぽしましょ。 ご飯を食べてから公園で/を一緒にさんぽしましょ。 ... both sound natural to me and I don't see much difference between them. You can also say ご飯の後で~~ ご飯を食べたら~~ ~~~一緒に公園にさんぽに行きましょ。 etc.


4

I think the 2nd is natural also. 1st is [一緒に]->[公園で散歩], 2nd is [公園で]->[一緒に散歩]. 1st strengthens "in the park", 2nd strengthens "with me". The pattern is "to place the word near a verb, if you want to make the word strongly connected with the verb." 映画を見た後で私と食事をしましょう proposes "to eat" or "to take a lunch", not to go to a park, etc. 映画を見た後で食事を私としましょう ...


4

In the sentence ◯◯に電話がかかった に indicates the recipient of the phone call. It would be very confusing if you suddenly tried to indicate the caller with に as well. に and から are not both viable options to indicate the caller, because に is already used to indicate the recipient. If you used に to indicate the caller, it would be like trying to say "I got a ...


3

から means what it always means, in this case it marks a reason. It may be easier to read if you insert (mental) brackets for the quotation: 本当のところを言うと、「この時間に悠馬さんがここを通るから」と、夏目さんに教えてもらったので、待っていたんです。 Actually, I was waiting, because Natsume had told me that at this time Yũma would come by here. Maybe 夏目 said 4時に悠馬さんがここを通るから、ここで待っていてください。 Yũma comes ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...


3

I think you need to look at the nature and type of verb. かかる is an intransitive verb of direction ("virtual motion" in cyber space) and the sentence describes the direction of the subject, the telephone call: It is natural to describe the starting and finishing points with から and に. It would be different if this were a transitive verb, or an action being ...


1

I don't think that is unusual at all. Which number you put first depends on the context. If you are talking about the value of a devaluating currency, you could well put the maximum first and then the minimum last. That would be like saying that in English you'd never say something like "this variable can take any value from 2 to 1". If a higher value is ...


1

It's simply that てから puts a strong emphasis on the order of the actions. て is just an enumeration and doesn't necessarily imply ordering. 味噌汁を飲んでご飯を食べる。 Drink miso soup and eat rice. (both happen, maybe together, maybe one after the other, but we can't say - they're just 2 parts of a same group of actions) 味噌汁を飲んでからご飯を食べる。 First drink miso soup, and ...



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