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(Here I'm trying to show why 四方を海に囲まれる is not direct passive. Please see this as an appendix to broccoliforest's answer and reply to KentaroTomono's comment.) First, OP's second sentence 四方が海に囲まれる is direct passive. Wikipedia defines「直接受身は、能動文における直接目的語または間接目的語を主語にするものである。」(source). Following this definition, a direct passive sentence is formed this ...


2

The order does not matter in Japanese The only rule is that the verb must come last (aside from sentence-ending particles). The following are all correct and mean the same thing: 6時に私がケーキを食べた ケーキを私が6時に食べた 私が6時にケーキを食べた They all mean "I ate (the) cake at 6:00". In English, which relies on word order to determine grammar roles of words, flipping ...


5

Your question actually contains multiple topics. Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Does this type of passive allow for the を? Is 四方が海に囲まれる correct as well? Spoiler: 1.—Maybe, 2.—Yes, 3.—Yes Is 四方を海に囲まれる an indirect passive sentence? Well, it depends. Japanese passive usages can be categorized into three types. Direct ...


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


0

勉強がする and 復活がする don't make sense. 感情がする and 感情をする themselves make little sense but for example, なつかしい感情がした can be understood as 懐かしい感情を覚えた and 複雑な感情をしたロボット as "a robot who is equipped with complex emotion".


3

My textbook has this example: 四方を海に囲まれる。 Is it the indirect passive that allows for the を direct object marker to be used in that passive voice example? The answer is no. It is the direct passive voice. The reason will be explained below. In Japanese,the passive voice takes human beings (or something which can feel emotions as the de-facto subject ...


1

Yes, the indirect passive (aka "suffering passive") allows for を to mark the object of a transitive verb. There are, in general, three basic structures to create a passive in Japanese: [subject] が [agent] に [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [object] を [transitive verb] [subject] が [agent] に [intransitive verb] Number 1 is the regular passive that ...


4

My thinking is that "私" is always in the "universe of discussion". Yes, and that's why you should always say, for example, 「私は本を買った」, but not 「私が本を買った」in simple sentences, unless "exhaustive listing" is clearly intended. But in relative clauses modifying a noun, we have to use が or の. は is the "topic marker", and a relative clause does not serve as the ...


1

It is not a question of possession. I'll show it to you using your example. Let's say : He has built a car. 彼が車を造りました。 If you want to say more about the car e.g.’ The car he built got famous in the whole country.’, it comes to the change your question is about. The sentence will be like this. 彼の造った車が、全国で有名になりました。


4

暮れる alone can mean 'a day ends' or 'the sun sets' but 日 usually accompanies it. I don't think '日が' have any implications here. 暮れる actually means 'a day, a month, a season or a year ends'. We say '今年も暮れますね' in December.



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