Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

In the first place, "hanbaaga-ga" as in "hanbaaga-ga hoshii" is not the subject. So it doesn't mean a burger is wanted. Both the subject and the object of "hoshii" are indicated by ga, in other words, when you express "bobu-wa hanbaaga-ga hoshii" without any topicalized elements, it becomes "bobu-ga hanbaaga-ga hoshii". So, "who wants a burger" can be ...


2

Maybe the particle you chose, に (ni), is not quite right. ボブにハンバーガーが欲しい (bobu-ni hanbaaga-ga hoshii) and ハンバーガーがボブに欲しい (hanbaaga-ga bobu-ni hoshii) would mean something like "(I) want a burger for Bob". It's I or someone else, not Bob, that is the implicit wanter, and the wanter likes to give the burger to Bob. Of course we usually don't say things like ...


2

彼の情熱的な抱擁で彼女は息がつけなかった。 Why is 息 marked here as the object (assuming が is used here as an object marker)? It's because of the potential form つける. The つける(吐ける) is the potential(可能形) form of the transitive verb つく(吐く). For example: 「英語を話す」--> 「英語を話せる」「英語が話せる」「英語が話せない」 「目を離す」--> 「目を離せない」「目が離せない」 「単位を取る」--> 「単位を取れない」「単位が取れる」「単位が取れない」 「論文を書く」--> ...


2

As you said, "ga" is used to indicate specific things, and in some cases can serve as a topic marker. In the first two examples your topic is being marked by "wa". In the case of the latter three examples, the topic. The first example asks "When is the meeting?". Kaigi (meeting) wa (topic marker) itsu (when, question word) desu (copula, in this case "is") ...


0

が is used here as an object marker That's right. make any difference? No difference (or minor difference) I think. 呼吸をするという意味の「息を吐く(いき を つく)」 という表現は、多くの人が、知らないと答えると思います。(漢字で書けば、意味は通じます。) 多くの人は、「息を吐く」と書くと、「いき を はく」 と読むと思います。 呼吸をするという意味で、多く使われる表現は、「息」-「を」-「する」です。 「息-を-する-こと-が-できる/できない」を省略した表現が、 「息-が-できる/できない」 です。 「息-を-できる/できない」でも、意味は通じます。 ...


3

I don't know wether this is grammatically correct or not, but I would never say it, but I think : 日本語を好きになる Sounds very natural, even though it doesn't really mean : 日本語が好きだ


4

The difference is that "suki" is an adjectival-noun (the set of nouns which are closer in meaning to our adjectives, but function grammatically more like nouns). It stands in place of the English "to like", which is a verb -- hence the confusion. If it helps, try thinking about "suki" as meaning "an enjoyable-to-Subject thing" rather than "I like [x]".


2

2番目の文で「が」を使ったことには、いくつかの理由があると思います。 一部、想像ですが、 作者が、「は」を繰り返すより、2番目を「が」にした方が美しいと感じたから 「が」の場合は、「自らの意思で」などの(積極的に何かをしたという)意味を含むから あまり意識せずに使った 2番目で「は」を使うと、「それ以外の神様は、別のことをした」という意味が生まれるから 「は」は、水彩画の薄い絵の具で塗り分けるようなイメージ、 「が」は、ボールペンのような、はっきりとした線で境界を描くイメージがあります。 「は」は、「○○のうち、△△は □□した。(それ以外は xxした。)」というように、「一部が」というニュアンスを強調することになります。 With 「が」: "Many gods decided to ...



Top 50 recent answers are included