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に emphasizes the location へ emphasizes the direction まで emphasizes the process or journey


9

There is a very subtle difference between the two--with に, the destination is more important; with へ, the journey is more important. You might use に if you want to say you're going "to the store" and へ if you want to say you're going "in the direction of the store [and ending up there]." Is there a lot of practical difference in how they are used? Not ...


7

Put simply, the particle へ is derived from the noun 方{へ}. Bjarke Frellesvig provides a brief explanation in his book A History of the Japanese Language (page 132). … The noun pye "side, direction" was being grammaticalized as an allative case particle pye, but in the Old Japanese period had not yet acquired that status. As for pronunciation, sound ...


7

The に you presented indicates purpose of going rather than a direction. Related: Is it true that only movement verbs can take [V-stem]に to express a purpose? Constituent parts: おばあさんは(The woman(topic))  川へ(in the direction of river)  せんたくしに(for the purpose of laundry)  でかけます(go out) Sentence: The woman goes out to the river to do laundry.


7

へと is used when you are directing your audience's attention to the content that comes after the と for emphasis. 「やや強意の副詞的表現に属することを表す」 Example: 透【す】き通【とお】るような青【あお】空【ぞら】の中【なか】へと白【しろ】いボールが吸【す】い込まれていく The white ball disappeared into the crystal clear blue sky 透き通るような青空の中 へ 白いボールが吸い込まれていく Without the と it is simply a statement of fact. Q: "What did the ...


6

In English terms, when saying 左{ひだり}に曲{ま}がる you're saying "turn to the left", and when you say 左{ひだり}へ曲{ま}がる, you're simply saying, "turn left." Which, as Troyen pointed out in his comment, is still a little vague because the difference in English is also subtle. So much so that I have to concede that there is a fair amount of individual perception here on ...


6

は is the topic particle and can be used in combination with a variety of particles. When combined with the subject particle が or the object particle を, は usually replaces が or を. With all other particles, it goes after the particle. (In fact, を+は may also turn into をば, see Dono's comment.) In your example sentence, it makes ゴルフ大会へ "to the golf tournament" ...


5

へ and に can both translate as "to" and are often interchangeable. The difference is that へ focuses on the process or course of going in a direction or to a place, while に focuses on the destination itself [1]. まで, being a particle that defines an upper bound, thus focuses on the distance traveled. The function of ~の方(に/へ) depends on which particle follows. ...


5

Side note to the question but relevant: Use only へ when you want to use the grammatical construct 〜への〜. ◯ 改札口への階段はどこですか。 Where are the steps to the ticket gate? × 改札口にの階段はどこですか。


5

As ファルキエッレ stated, the particle へ is cognate with the noun, variously spelled 方 or 辺, and probably derives from it. This has been a very productive noun, appearing as a component of many terms in modern Japanese: 芦辺 ashibe, "reed-covered bank" 海辺 umibe, "seaside" 夕べ yūbe, "last night, yesterday evening" Some modern JA terms aren't necessarily even ...


4

I expect to see/hear「税率が10パーセントへと下がる」on newspaper or TV news. I'd say「税率が10パーセントに下がる」in normal conversation. (I'm not sure if we say「税率が10パーセントへ下がる」.) 「来年度へと先送りする」「来年度へ先送りする」are what I expect to see/hear on newspaper or TV news. I think I use「来年度に先送りする」in daily conversation, and I wouldn't say 「来年度へと先送りされる」when I talk casually. To me,「旅客機は東京へと旅立った」sounds ...


4

I've always seen に as meaning going somewhere directly without any intention of stopping, whereas へ shows that they are going that way, but if they see something interesting they may stop or make a detour.


2

I think it's not much different than the other threads (to which I will not link). I would say it's nothing more than 右に being "turn right" and 右へ being "turn to the right" or "turn right-ish".


2

On a pedantic note, there is an old saying the goes like 京へ、筑紫に、坂東さ (ca 1609) 京に、つくしへ、坂東さ (ca 1496) [Source] which shows how each dialect used different particle to say 北海道○行く around that time. 京 is for Kyoto, 筑紫(つくし) is Kyushu and 坂東 is Kanto/Tohoku. Being just a layperson on Japanese linguistics, I'll just stop here, but I'm sure a more ...


2

One definition of は is as the "topic marker particle." In some instances, you can better understand the meaning by (clumsily) translating it as "as for." So in this instance one could translate the sentence as follows: ところで、今週末のゴルフ大会へは行くんですか。 By the way, as for this weekend's golf tournament, are you going ? Which would be translated in "natural" ...


1

The point is that あなたに・あなたへ are adverbial, and modify a verb (or a whole clause), but あなたへの is adjectival, and modifies a noun. You should see it as ((あなたへ)の)私の愛 - that is, への is not really a double-particle, but rather の is joining onto the end of the adverbial phrase あなたへ, in order to allow it to modify the noun phrase 私の愛. And so: あなたに私の愛 is an ...


1

In answer to your first question: 「に」 can also be used (at times) where you are receiving something from someone else. Perhaps the user you mentioned was directing you to「へ」as a way to avoid that possible meaning? For example, what if「あなたに私{わたし}の愛{あい}」were read as: "my love from you"? (Would that make sense?) An example of this type of 「に」usage can be ...


1

As far as I know it's fine to use に after both verb stems and nouns when given as reasons for something. E.g. お土産に買う - I will buy it as a souvenir And to give a more concrete answer to your question: The particles convey different information, one is direction and the other is reason. Of course you can't have two directions, but that is not the case here. ...



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