Hot answers tagged

9

In this case, the particle で denotes method/means ('by means of', 'with', 'using', etc.) The difference is 'speak in Japanese' vs 'speak Japanese'. 日本語で上手に話せます。 One can (speak / talk with someone / say something) well in Japanese. 日本語が上手に話せます。 One can speak Japanese well. (= One is a good Japanese speaker). When someone says 日本語で話す, it ...


9

Both are grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. お寺で名前を登録する means "to register their names at the temple". The temple happens to be where they registered their names. Their names will be recorded in the list which may or may not be managed by the temple itself. お寺に名前を登録する means "to register their names with the temple". It's clear that ...


7

かけた as Current State This question is testing whether you understand how the seemingly past tense かけた can actually be describing the current state of a person. This kind of verb usage happens a lot with articles of clothing. The correct translation is not “who wore glasses”, but rather: The person beside me who is wearing glasses is Suzuki-san. ...


7

"大声で" isn't an adverb, but rather a noun followed by the particle で, which indicates the means by which something is done. The difference is like the English "There was even a person who was singing in a loud voice while climbing the mountain" vs. "There was even a person who was singing loudly while climbing the mountain". "大声で" is better thought of as the ...


7

Think about it like this: ピアニストです。 'is a pianist'    歌手です。 'is a singer' To negate this, we'll want to split です up into で+あります: ピアニストで あります。 'is a pianist'    歌手で あります。 'is a singer' Now we can negate あります and insert は to go with the negation: ピアニストでは ありません。 'is not a pianist'    歌手では ありません。 'is not a singer' To put these both ...


6

「ジョンさんはうちととしょかんでべんきょうします。」 This sentence is grammatical but it does not sound very natural for a couple of reasons. 1) Use of 「うち」. In this sentence, the speaker is NOT ジョン. When native Japanese-speakers hear just 「うち」, we would tend to think it refers to the speaker's home as @broccoli forest states in the comment above. To avoid that, you can use ...


5

I would translate 微妙な具合で to 'in a subtle way'. How 'subtle' is it? What does 微妙な具合で actually mean? The following sentences explain: 暑くはないが、涼しくもない、停滞しているような、それでいて流れの存在しているような。 全てが内保されて、中には何も存在しない。 矛盾こそが理論的であり、同時に混沌の中に秩序が成り立っている。 で here shows a certain condition or state.


5

「[日本料理]{にほんりょうり}は[京都]{きょうと}の[料理]{りょうり}でたいへん[美味]{おい}しい。」 The content of the sentence is somewhat questionable, but it is a grammatical sentence and it can be analyzed as such. The 「で」 here is an auxiliary verb, not a particle. 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (the conjunctive / continuative form) of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」.  This 「で」 can be replaced ...


4

扉はやはり音もなく、押されるままで動いた。 This is unnatural. ままで is usually used to indicate that the state is unchanged; e.g. 凍ったままである (remain frozen)


3

ボールペンで書{か}いています is correct で = "by means of/with" in this context. Your other sentence ボールペンをかいています would literally mean "I am writing a pen" which doesn't make any sense.


3

たかだか is an adverb and has no adjective use. たかだかと — highly; aloft; sonorously たかだか (without と) — merely; no more than; at most


3

When I read this question, I instantly remembered an English sentence that looked and felt very strange when I was struggling to learn English many years ago. That sentence was: "I came home sick." My Japanese-speaking brain just kind of refused to accept it. To me, at least a word was missing in front of the last word "sick". I think I was unconsciously ...


2

The は particle is frequently when expressing negative things, not just in the case of "ではない" (じゃない) but in a form like form "XはYがない". While there is some nuance difference, I think for the most part "には意味がない”,"では意味がない”, and "は意味がない” have a similar meaning. You can do a web search and see that they are all used in similar situations. However, in the ...


2

Let me caveat this answer by saying that I've only been learning for a year and use of は is a mind bending subject. First of all, は does not mean 'be'. If you really think this then you have a serious misunderstanding. In your example the function of 'be' is provided by です. は is the topic or contrast marker. For me the distinction between topic and contrast ...


2

As you said yourself, じゃ is just the colloquial form of では。If the sentence was written more "properly" it would be: 相手では意味が無い See: では・じゃ


2

The fundamental difference between 〜で and 〜に is that the former is an adjunct (can be removed from the clause) while the latter is an argument (cannot be removed from the clause). Unfortunately, this is made hard to understand by the fact that arguments can be omitted in Japanese (even though they are still in the clause, inferred). However, this ...


2

The meaning of two sentences is same. で in this case is used as the method of representing tool and が is used as a postpositional particle of the method of representing the subject.


2

As the dialog gives us no other clues what たもつ really had in his mind, I think 「僕はチーズバーガーで[腹]{はら}ごしらえする/腹ごしらえしておく」 would be the most logical expansion.


2

I agree with you; I would interpret this sentence about サルビア as "red and beautiful", where 真っ赤 and 美しい are connected in parallel. 真っ赤に美しい (redly beautiful?) doesn't make sense to me, but grammatically, that should be how 真っ赤 can adverbially modify 美しい. The same goes for 平凡で埋没している. It's just "キャラクターが平凡だ and キャラクターが埋没している".


2

Methinks 2) is a good guess. で in this case stands for "by", "with", "because of" or "due to". Meanwhile I don't think 1) and 3) are particularly out-of-point.


1

This で clearly indicates cause (原因{げんいん}) goo で ❶-7. 開け放った窓から入ってくる夏の空気が、微妙な具合で五感を鈍くしているのかも知れない。 The summer atmosphere filtering in through the opened window. Under this delicate/subtle situation, his/her (five) senses (seem to) have become dull.


1

It's very difficult to explain because how で and に are used in your examples is a very basic usage. In the first place, I suspect the theory that says verbs that stand for state of something take に for the locative marker, because you can easily indicate counterexamples. (In this point, I have written an article in Lang-8. ...


1

じゃあ、僕はチーズバーガーで in textbook version would look like: > それでは、僕はチーズバーガーにします In this case 「で」expresses his choice.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible