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18

The difference between using で and と is the difference between "we went out as a family" and "I went out with my family", I think of it as rather like the French "en famille". 家族で is very common expression and you can also hear this grammatical use when people refer to doing things as a group (グループで/皆でやりましょう). It is another variation on the use of the で ...


16

In general, で is where an action is performed and に is the "direction" toward/to/into which the result of an action happens. 部屋の中で泣いています → I'm crying in the room / "The place where I'm at while I'm crying is in the room" 部屋の中に泣いています → I'm crying into the room (meaning like, your tears are flowing from your face into the room). This doesn't make ...


13

What I have been taught in the college is that に is only used for verbs that imply motions which destination/position is required to be specified. For example, if you say "ikimasu" (I'm going), unless already in the context, you need to specify the destination otherwise the sentence does not make sense. So, you use "ni": "asoko ni ikimasu" On the other ...


12

的 makes 世界 into a 形容動詞 ("na-adjective"), which, when functioning as adverb, turns into ~的に. ~的では is simply ungrammatical.


10

There are some interesting connotations in the Chiebukuro examples crunchyt kindly pointed to which I think are worth going over in more detail. First, the ~でする and ~にする forms: この仕事はあとでします。 I'll do this job later. この仕事はあとにします。 I'll do this job later. Now, the fact that these are both allowable and both have the same (English) translation doesn't ...


10

Let's start with something common: 夢は夢だ。 'Dreams are dreams.' Let's negate it (using ではない instead of its contracted form じゃない): 夢は夢ではない。 'Dreams are not dreams.' は is a 係助詞{かかりじょし} ("binding particle"). Any 係助詞 fits in this spot. しか is also a 係助詞: 夢は夢でしかない。'Dreams are nothing but dreams.' The "modern" grammatical analysis of this stuff is ...


9

より, when preceding an adjective as in your examples, means "more" or "-er": より多くの more [numerous] より快適な more pleasant, smoother より長い longer より良い better より一般的な more common, more typical As such, でより and でのより should not be considered together. で and での go with the preceding word, and より goes with the succeeding word.


9

Your question is about two different things: The usage of particle で and particle に to express place vs. action. The usage of particle は to highlight a matter in the sentence. Understanding particle で vs. particle に When you want to express where a certain action is taking place, you use particle で. Consider the following examples: 1a) My mom bought ...


9

Is the particle に okay? I'm afraid not. I think you can say it like this: 田中さんはビデオゲームで遊んでいます。 This で is like "with", as in the instrumental (具格{ぐかく}) case, rather than "in" or "on". Or you can also say: 田中さんはビデオゲームをしています。 田中さんはビデオゲームをして遊んでいます。


8

のに can have several meanings, "despite" being the most common one. But it can also mean "in order to" (~のため)。Here are some examples (taken from here http://www.jgram.org/pages/viewOne.php?tagE=noni-2): パスポートは海外旅行に行くのに必要です。 A passport is necessary to travel abroad. 電子レンジは冷めた料理を温めるのに重宝だ。 A microwave is handy to heat up cold food.


7

I suspect it's the nominalizer の, making the noun phrase "...温めるの". Then the 'directional/intention' particle に is appended, giving intention towards which the 電子レンジ can be considered 重宝. This can be occasionally tricky to sort out from the "in spite of" usage, but it is an alternate parse to be aware of.


7

The scope of だけ is different depending on where you put it. このぬいぐるみを((日本だけ)で)手に入れます。- "You can get this plush toy in (only Japan)" このぬいぐるみを((日本で)だけ)手に入れます。- "You can get this plush toy ((in Japan) only)" Here it does not seem to show a big difference. Translating from this source: ~だけで is typically used to mean "just this method/location/person will ...


7

I don't see much difference between: [家]{いえ}に[一人]{ひとり}です。and 家で一人です。 [今]{いま}、家に[独]{ひと}りぼっちです。and 今、家で独りぼっちです。 [今夜]{こんや}は[部屋]{へや}に一人きりだ。and 今夜は部屋で一人きりだ。 I think we tend to use で in daily conversation and に when we write when we use 一人だ/独りぼっちだ etc. to mean "alone/there's nobody else in the room/house". However, I see a slight difference between: ...


6

I agree with Amanda, a great question. To summarise with regard to 'time': "後で" means you are using the time you have later to do the action, whereas... "後に" implies you choose "later" from amongst other options (e.g. instead of 'now', 'never' or even 'undefined') for performing the action (i.e. eating). I found the answer here on Chiebukuro ...


6

This can depend on the arguments a verb takes. For example, いる uses に for location. かべでいる would make no sense. 書く takes an argument for something to be written on; 「壁に書く」 means "write on a wall", and 「壁で書く」 means "write at a wall". For the 泣く example, you really could use either one, but で may be clearer because 泣く can take an argument marked by に to ...


6

その中に would mean "to within that [selection of apartments]". Kind of nonsensical. その中で would mean "at within that [selection of apartments]". Also kind of nonsensical. その中から means "from within that [selection of apartments]". Clunky because literal translations are clunky, but the logic is there. The whole sentence: 私はその中から好きな家を借りました。 "I rented an ...


6

Another definition of the particle で is "the condition/state of how the action takes place". This is the definition that your example fits in to. I suppose if it helps you to think of it as an "abstract location", then feel free to do so (as I firmly believe each individual has the right to do whatever helps them learn best), but I'd suggest just ...


6

First, we can't make the blanket statement that 一緒で is always incorrect, only that it is incorrect in this particular case. Let's start by identifying how に is used here. In the case of 一緒に, に works the same way as in expressions like きれいに ("neatly", "prettily") and 気軽に ("casually"): it turns the preceding word into an adverb and shows how the action is ...


6

As Ignacio have said, the い-form (or the [連用形]{ren'yōkei} form) is used with に to indicate a purpose. 特別なビザをもらいに行った means you're going somewhere, and your purpose for going there is getting a special visa. 特別なビザをもらって行った, however, is quite incorrect. Indeed, ~て-form + いく can be used to make a compound verb that means "beginning from a certain point, to be in ...


6

This でも means "〜 or something similar". So メシでも食べて means "eat some rice or something". The ででも in question is just the action-location-marker で plus the previous でも. So 舞台袖ででも大人しくして means "wait/behave quietly in the 舞台袖 (or somewhere)". (Not sure of the best translation for 舞台袖 -- literally the "wings of the stage", but maybe something like "off-stage" ...


6

[公園]{こうえん}で[散歩]{さんぽ}します。 公園を散歩します。 Both sound okay to me and I don't think there's much difference in meaning... just the former sounds a bit more colloquial to me, I would write を if I was told to fill in the blank in 「公園( )散歩します。」 in Japanese class, but I think I usually say "公園で散歩してたらblah blah..." or "公園散歩してたらblah blah・・・" (leaving out the を/で) in ...


6

Both 「[映画]{えいが}で[見]{み}る」 and 「映画に見る」 are correct and natural phrases but they have different meanings. 「映画で見る」 is the simpler and more often used of the two. If you saw a certain thing, place, actor, etc. in a movie, you 映画で those things を見た. Those tangible objects just physically appeared in the movie and you saw them. 「映画に見る」 is less often used and ...


5

A particle normally follows など. を and に are marked as optional (my dictionary puts them in parenthesis). For tools: フォークやスプーンなどで食べる人もいる。 "There are also people who eat it with things like forks and spoons." For places: 夏休みはXやYなど(に)行きましょうか。"Shall we go to places like X or Y for the summer vacation?" Interestingly, my dictionary says that if the ...


5

風に揺れる sounds a bit poetic and literary to me. If I'm writing an essay, novel or poem, I'd write 風に揺れる. I think we usually say 風で揺れる in daily conversations.


5

I agree with Chocolate that に is slightly more literary. But I think that both に and で mean a cause in this context, and に is not necessarily ruled out even in the daily conversation. I cannot pin down the exact difference between に and で, but I would like to point out that there are similar sentences where both に and で are grammatical and have almost the ...


5

They are pretty similar, but で usually indicates that an action took place at that location. So you use に when you're talking about being inside or next to something, etc. and で when you talk about doing something inside or next to something. Edited to add: 部屋の中で泣いている is correct, because the room is the location of an action (crying).



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