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2

In subordinate clauses like these, ONLY が can be replaced by の (and only when the verb follows immediately after, to prevent confusion with the other Noun+の+Noun meaning). を, で, and other particles cannot be replaced by の in subordinate clauses. For example: ○ 私が作った料理 → 私の作った料理 ○ 木村が買った本 → 木村の買った本 The phrase「絵の描くのは」is valid if the picture is the ...


3

This pattern is so common that it has a special name, a cleft sentence. 向かっているのは特別棟か。 So it's Special Building that we're heading to. verb + のは + whatever + だ/です is a basic pattern of cleft sentences, and it's similar to it's + whatever + that/who + verb pattern in English. の here is something like a dummy pronoun, and 特別棟 is the word that is focused....


3

すべて means "all", "everything" and it is a word which indicates quantity and a degree. の has many usages and this の is used with the words which indicate quantity and a degree. For example, 多くの牛(many cows), 二冊の本(two books).


3

This jisho entry lists すべて as a の adjective. These types of adjectives are usually nouns which function as adjectives when の is placed after them. すべて normally means "everything", but すべてのX means "every X".


3

In the first sentence, the only acceptable choice is は. 才能がないことはないけど、私の才能があまりすごくない is wrong because it lacks topics (while it's a sentence of statement that stands for general judgement or recognition about something). In other words, 私の才能は… is correct. The second sentence is basically the same. But there's a room to suppose (unusual) situations where you ...


0

Probably best not to use 私は unless this is the first sentence in a paragraph, or you're contrasting yourself with someone/everyone else. Something like this would sound better to me: 才能がないことはないけど、才能があまりすごくない。 But, if you definitely want to put 私は in, I would suggest putting it up front: 私は才能がないことはないけど、才能があまりすごくない。 To get across the full meaning ...


1

This 嫌がる is an attributive form of a verb 嫌がる. So 嫌がること is a noun phrase. 人の嫌がること is translated as "something that a person(or someone) doesn't want to do". This の act as が like 人が嫌がること.


4

In this case「多く」is not an adjective or an adverb. 多く is defined as a noun in Japanese dictionaries. See weblio(大辞林), here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E5%A4%9A%E3%81%8F There are other nouns that follow a similar pattern, like「近く」and「遠く」.


2

多く is nominalized word formed from the te-stem of the adjective 多い. = 多い [adjective] --> 多く [連用形 / te-stem] --> 多く [nominalized form] So this sentence make sense. For example, 私の学校の生徒の多くは女性だ(The students in my school are mostly girls).


1

Although, I think I do understand the meaning of it In one hour before 8:30 am, when the reservations started No, this sentence means "By 8:30 AM, which is an hour before the registration started, ...". The actual registration starts at 9:30, which is written at the end of the article. Here, の is used as the apposition marker. 友達の田中さん ...



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