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8

Your translation is not correct. It seems that there are a few misunderstandings involved here. First, “AとB” here means “B if A.” 仕事が成立しない means “I cannot do my job.” 新聞に目を通していないと、仕事が成立しない。 I cannot do my job without skimming the newspaper. Next, ~から means “because ….” Therefore, your sentence is 新聞に目を通していないと、仕事が成立しないからです。 It is because I ...


7

時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 時間がありませんでしたからパーティーに行きませんでした。 While the second one is relatively a bit politer than the first, neither of these are very casual nor polite. If you said these directly to the host of the party, the host would probably feel offended. If you said these to your close friend, he/she would feel that the "~でした" part is unnaturally ...


7

In a sense, yes, but に is the correct choice here. 受ける takes two objects, a "direct" and an "indirect" object. を marks the direct object, i.e. what is being received に marks the indirect object, i.e. from whom the direct object is being received を will not be translated at all, and に will be translated as "from". から, too, often means "from" but applies ...


7

And more importantly, when is it appropriate to use, Almost always, although it may sound a little bit informal. When asked "なぜ" or "どうして", you'd answer with からです。 なぜ遅れていますか? なぜなら、目覚まし時計が壊れていたからです。 (Why are you late? Because my alarm clock is broken) and how does it differ from ですから and んです? ですから is a connective, not a final part. "Aですから、B"...


6

独身{どくしん} で ハンサム だから ね Without further context it's hard to tell who is the subject/object of this phrase, but it shall be read: It's because だから someone is single and... どくしんで handsome ハンサム


5

That use of と should be conceptualized as “with”[1], and not “from”. “Xと離れる” is “to separate[2] with X”. Since you can both separate with and separate from something, both と and から work here (albeit with the subtle difference between “separating with” and “separating from” something[3]). “Xから聞く” is “to hear from X”. Replacing this with と would change the ...


5

In the sentence ◯◯に電話がかかった に indicates the recipient of the phone call. It would be very confusing if you suddenly tried to indicate the caller with に as well. に and から are not both viable options to indicate the caller, because に is already used to indicate the recipient. If you used に to indicate the caller, it would be like trying to say "I got a ...


4

I think you need to look at the nature and type of verb. かかる is an intransitive verb of direction ("virtual motion" in cyber space) and the sentence describes the direction of the subject, the telephone call: It is natural to describe the starting and finishing points with から and に. It would be different if this were a transitive verb, or an action being ...


4

I think 暑いから水を飲みました is natural.


4

I think it has something to do with the proceeding sentence. If you compare 「昨日は寝れませんでした。」 to 「函館山からの夜景を見るといいですよ。」 (from the example referenced in Enno's post), the latter is a suggestion, while the former is a fact. Making up some other examples with "suggestions", 「彼と会ったほうがいいと思いますよ。とてもいい人ですから。」 and 「その授業は取らないほうがいいと思いますよ。先生がとても怖い人ですから。」 seem fine as well. ...


3

Is it used by her to explain to him why she spoke? Does it have an obvious bit afterwards that is implied Yes, these are the two ways 〜ので。 works. And the more I think about it, it has a pretty straightforward equivalence to answering a sentence with Because…, and hanging a sentence with so…. Answering with “Because” The key in your specific example ...


3

から is really only used to designate the location/point/time from which things start, whereas を is a rather generic particle. Because of this, から makes the reader mentally picture a time range (今夜から明日にかけて雪になります), a motion (東京から大阪へは3時間かかります), a coverage (揺りかごから墓場まで), etc. In contrast, を just doesn't have this sense of motion/breadth/width. And so when this ...


3

I think the 2nd is natural also. 1st is [一緒に]->[公園で散歩], 2nd is [公園で]->[一緒に散歩]. 1st strengthens "in the park", 2nd strengthens "with me". The pattern is "to place the word near a verb, if you want to make the word strongly connected with the verb." 映画を見た後で私と食事をしましょう proposes "to eat" or "to take a lunch", not to go to a park, etc. 映画を見た後で食事を私としましょう ...


3

から means what it always means, in this case it marks a reason. It may be easier to read if you insert (mental) brackets for the quotation: 本当のところを言うと、「この時間に悠馬さんがここを通るから」と、夏目さんに教えてもらったので、待っていたんです。 Actually, I was waiting, because Natsume had told me that at this time Yũma would come by here. Maybe 夏目 said 4時に悠馬さんがここを通るから、ここで待っていてください。 Yũma comes ...


2

Can 「ですから」 be used in place of 「だから」? Technically, yes. In practice, no. It's very rare to use ですます調(敬体)in this situation. When a sentence contains the type of から (English "because") that you are using here, it always comes with a second part. As long as the second part is in 敬体 the whole sentence is assumed to be. So your example: 「早く寝ましたから早く起きます。」...


2

It's simply that てから puts a strong emphasis on the order of the actions. て is just an enumeration and doesn't necessarily imply ordering. 味噌汁を飲んでご飯を食べる。 Drink miso soup and eat rice. (both happen, maybe together, maybe one after the other, but we can't say - they're just 2 parts of a same group of actions) 味噌汁を飲んでからご飯を食べる。 First drink miso soup, and ...


2

[one or more factors that make one popular etc.]だからね This is a common phrase to acknowledge someone for being pretty good in some way (popular, smart, etc.) either in front of them or when gossiping about them. It's basically "It makes sense how he's popular with women when you know that he's single and handsome." Japanese people fill in that sentence ...


2

I really like Darius's observation about suggestion vs. fact, and that certainly has something to do with it, but I think there is also another reason for it being weird. A lot of the awkwardness comes from the “悪かったですから”, rather than just the “ですから”. For example, it doesn't sound as weird when you tweak it to avoid making a 〜かったですから: 昨日は寝れませんでした。...


2

In my response to your new query, MORE INFO In an effort to make my question as short as possible, I abbreviated too much. This is the complete sentence that originated my question: 少年時代から20年間もずっと過ごしてきて、他人から軽んじられるのに慣れていなかった。 Now you can see what I clipped. I removed important information. Sorry I caused confusion. I've learned how to ask ...



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