Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

According to Wikipedia, it would appear that there were in fact a wide range of characters used for any given sound prior to the de-facto standardization that was the creation of the Kana syllabaries (keeping in mind, of course, that at their roots the kana characters are either cursive forms of characters [ひらがな] or isolated elements of characters [カタカナ]). ...


0

Firstly, the official list of kanji is there to specify kanji themselves and that doesn't really include all the words where a specific kanji can be used. That would make it a dictionary which it isn't. Let me address some issues in more details: The list from the link you included does include examples where you can check okurigana. For example, the ...


-2

Only for some nouns you can play with the 送り仮名, for all normal verbs and stuff you shouldn't play around much at all. As a rule of thumb is to base it on ambiguity. In most of the nouns people won't mistake you if you use 飲物 instead, but with verbs you could accidently make it look like both the transitive and intransitive if you removed too much 送り仮名. ...


1

Anime characters are often the case since children cannot read kanji. ドラえもん ジャムおじさん タルるート


9

There's even an exceptional word which mixes hiragana, katakana, and kanji, くノ一. Generally speaking, words are written with mixed writing systems when there are reasons to write different parts in different ways. (Sounds obvious, huh?) For example, in Tokyo Nagoya's example of あんパン, the first morpheme comes from Chinese 餡{あん}, and the second from ...


4

バグる → (technology) to be buggy, not work correctly; freezing; crashing スマホ、バグッちゃった! → My smartphone froze/crashed/messed up!


5

After reading the first couple of examples in the comments I Googled them and discovered the English Wiktionary actually has an appendix of exactly these terms: Appendix:Japanese words written in mixed kana But they must be quite rare or the appendix very incomplete, because it currently only includes three words (plus one Proper noun): サボる ...


4

Yes - the weird one for me was always サボる because it even conjugates normally.


7

あんパン(bread roll filled with red bean paste)、 ピザまん(pizza flavored steamed bun)、 じゃがバター(baked/boiled potato topped with butter)、 みそラーメン(ramen with miso based soup)、 エロい(horny)、 ダサい(hickish), etc.


6

The act of assigning kanjis to words that ignore kanji's meaning is called 当て字 (ateji), and that has a long history. According to Wikipedia article on 当て字, this was very common in the past because the language used to rely on Kanji/Hiragana boundary to help distinguish nouns, verbs, etc from particles. The article is full of great examples like 珈琲, 滅茶苦茶, and ...


0

There's probably too many different reasons why カナ and 漢字 are used / not used in contemporary Japanese. I don't know all the rules, but I will mention two: (1) katakana are used when the 漢字 are considered too hard to write (癌 becomes ガン) and (2) grammatical uses of verbs, i.e. helping verb type uses do not use 漢字. × 出来る  ○ できる × 遊んで見る ○ 遊んでみる × 貰って下さる ○ ...


4

Heads up: Some of this is going to be a bit obscure. Wikipedia covers some of this ground; examples consisting of proper names, place names, etc. were checked via Japanese Wikipedia articles. ウィ、ウ、ウェ、ウォ Due to holes in the ワ column (including the general restriction of 「ヲ」 to grammatical duties), 「ウ」can pair with other vowels to replicate /w/ ...


3

They are all variations of the same word. The only difference here is the degree of emphasis and where the emphasis is. For example, "っ" in "すっ" just represents a bit of pause between "す" and "げ". "ぇ", "え", and "ー" all represent dragging of the "げ" sound, but "ー" is longer than "え", and "ぇ" is a very short addition. None is more correct than others, and the ...


0

I generally agree with what ssb and Earthlin say, and would add the following thought: consider the potential consequences of using the long vowel marker indiscriminately. It can look an awful lot like the kanji for "one", i.e. 一 (いち). That could potentially be confusing. In many cases, readers could figure it out by context, but by using ~, you very ...



Top 50 recent answers are included