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12

Japanese elementary school children are generally taught to write kanji like this (教科書体): I don't know how these are different from how Chinese kids are taught to write these characters. However, this largely depends on the font, and adults actually handwrite these dots in many ways according to their preference. Practically, there is no strict rule here,...


11

There's a quick way to know this. The place where a space can be inserted is roughly the same place where ね can be naturally inserted. あらわれでたのはね、 くろマントにね、くろいね、ぼうしのね、さんにんぐみ。 それはそれはね、こわーいね、どろぼうさまのね、おでかけだ。 Actually this structure is known as 文節. Basically, a 文節 starts with a noun/adjective/verb/adverb/etc, optionally followed by one or more subsidiary ...


10

Historical Background According to the 歴史的{れきしてき}経緯{けいい} section of the 縦書{たてが}きと横書{よこが}き article on the Japanese Wikipedia, apparently in the late 1800s it wasn't altogether uncommon for printed materials to have Japanese still written vertically top-to-bottom with lines progressing right-to-left, with any European-language text written horizontally left-...


10

In general, if you're storing any Japanese text that needs to be sorted, you probably want to go with Kanatype insensitive. Why would you want it like this? Because it makes sorting more intuitive in terms of Japanese language. In english, since we have only one writing system, it's easy to sort things algorithmically. We simply order the characters by ...


9

As with almost anything, there are people who care and others who don't! But it is definitely a thing to consider if you are trying to write well. Degrees of severity There are two angles to this. One is “trivial“, in that the consideration is mostly about legibility, flow, and aesthetics. The other is more consequential, where the “false compound” could ...


8

Yes. 幽霊文字 https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B9%BD%E9%9C%8A%E6%96%87%E5%AD%97 幽霊文字(ゆうれいもじ)とは、JIS基本漢字に含まれる、典拠不明の文字の総称。 JIS基本漢字 (aka JIS第1・第2水準漢字) is a set of Japanese characters (including approx. 6350 kanji) established in 1978. It has been widely supported by personal computers since then, but this standard contains several kanji which have no ...


8

Almost nobody cares if you write them in hiragana or kanji. Theoretically, the kanji 私 is only associated with わたくし, whose original meaning is "personal, private". But insisting so in this age only sounds very much like the "spelling police", because the most prevalent usage of わたくし is, after all, as first-person pronoun like its shortened form わたし. Plus, ...


8

ありがとうございます is a greeting which was lexicalized long ago, and I don't think it's a good idea to analyze it like this and try to apply the modern style guideline. And while most of the recent style guidelines do say hiragana should be used for auxiliary verbs, this is not a strict rule. Not many people strictly follow this in daily life. I can't say, for ...


8

I'm Japanese native speaker. In my opinion, little "っ" at the end of sentence is not pronounced at all. However, it often indicates "small" (not so serious) emotions of speaker, I'll show you some example, comparing with other two expressions for writing: 01. ふざけんなよっ 02. ふざけんなよ… 03. ふざけるなよ! (All sentences mean "Don't be silly") As you see, first sentence is ...


7

Using ハ for particle "wa" was a part of their proper style to write official documents or letters at that time. The writing style of 日米和親条約 in your image is [候文]{そうろう・ぶん}, which was a formal writing style during the Edo period. If you would read other 候文 documents or letters written in the Edo period, you would notice that ハ is almost always used for ...


7

Firstly, r­ōmaji is not used to write Japanese. (The only Latin letters you find in Japanese text are abbreviations, like CD, OL, TPP, etc.) Now, the question reduces to whether all of 猫, ねこ and ネコ can be used to say "cat". And the answer is "yes!". Especially for plants and animals, it's often not so easy to decide which is the most natural choice in a ...


6

Because 醒 was not a 常用漢字 until 2010. 覚せい剤取締法 has been around long before that. According to 覚醒剤 - Wikipedia: 覚醒の「醒」が「せい」と表記されるのは、2010年まで常用漢字ではなかったためである And according to 覚せい剤取締法 - Wikipedia: 「醒」の文字は2010年に改定されて常用漢字となり、法律の条文や法律名を除き一般名詞としては、覚醒の文字を報道でも用いるよう合意がなされている。 麻薬及び向精神薬取締法においては、2013年に表記が覚醒剤に改められている。


6

This is one of the reasons why stroke order can be important. When looking at handwritten characters, you can get a sense for what each one is even if it's relatively illegible by looking at the direction and order of the strokes. Characters like シ and ツ can be written by hand in a way that very clearly indicates which it is: write シ with clearly horizontal ...


5

It's because を is not used in post-1946 orthography. All of the をs were changed to おs, for example, おかしい, おとこ. The only reason we use it today is because it was retained in the particle を, but it's not the correct spelling of any dictionary word. (ヲタク is slang.) My 新明解 lists four words that start with を, and they are all grammatical terms relating to the ...


5

The document follows consistent rules, if you look at it more closely. Firstly, the document itself is actually highly cursive, both in its kanji and hiragana. After this time and up until 1945, it became standard for treaties and formal documents to be written exclusively in kanji and katakana. The fact that this uses hiragana is a result of its cursive ...


5

We call them: No reliable information on how they are to be pronounced → 音【おん】(未詳【みしょう】/不明【ふめい】)字【じ】 No reliable information on what they mean → 義【ぎ】(未詳/不明)字 All of the above → 音義(未詳/不明)字 幽霊文字 in @naruto's answer is usually considered as a subset of them (technically, meaning/pronunciation of some 幽霊文字 are easily inferrable so they're not true subset). ...


4

They're mostly interchangeable. If you want to be nit-picky, 交替 is for regularly occurring changes, and 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule.


4

There are basic rules about the use of commas in Japanese but these are not absolute. I think a writer can use commas as they like to make a sentence easier to read. And I don't think there is a clear rule in Japanese as you say.


4

It is 篆書 (Mandarin //tʂʷan ʂu//), and more precisely it is 小篆 (Mandarin //ɕʲɑu tʂʷan//). 篆 means write, seal 書 means write/writing, books etc. 小 means tiny, small. There exists another kind of 篆書 is called 大篆 (大 "big, huge"). The Chinese written in the top-right corner are 枝頭覓春. 枝 branch, twig 頭 head, top 覓 find, search, seek, get 春 spring (the season) ...


3

手書きフォント 日本語は印刷用のフォントを作るのが大変だったり、カジュアルな場面で手書きが好まれることもあり、フリーフォントの多くが手書きのものです。読み書きの参考になりそうなものをいくつか紹介します。(画像はリンク先から仮名の一部を抜き出したものです) ふい字 わりとよくある字形だと思います。字画の細かい部分はかなり省略されます。 隼文字 かなり丁寧に書かないとこのような形にはなりません。それぞれの字の曲線の形に気をつけないといけません。上品な印象になります。 ジンペン毛羽-R 看板などでなるべく大きく見えるように書くとこのようになります。字をふくらませた時のバランスがわかります。 ホリデイ-MDJP03 かなり雑に書いた字です。ひらがなもカタカナも同じような書き方になりますが、...


3

When a small vowel is added to a kana with the same vowel sound, it does indeed work the same as a [長音符]{chōonpu}. (If the kana has a different vowel sound, then the sound is not extended.) There are no hard and fast rules about this, but it seems that the ィ here is used in proper nouns to indicate that the English spelling ends with "y" instead of being ...


3

In modern (and medieval) Greek, Χριστος is pronounced /xristos/. The [h] in ハ is the closest Japanese can come to [x]. Compare バッハ for German /bax/. It's not ヒ, because that would represent [ç] (I imagine German 'ich' [iç] would be transcribed イッヒ). It's not フ, because that would represent [f] or [ϕ]. It's not キ, because that would represent [c] or [k]. ...


2

With the writing reform almost most instances of the old ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ have been replaced with the homophonic じ・ジ and ず・ズ with the following exceptions: ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ are still used in words containing a voiced repeated ち or つ (i.e. one that could be written with a voiced iteration mark ゞ), e.g. ちぢむ(縮む) つづく(続く) ぢ・ヂ and づ・ヅ may appear as a result of ...


2

Yes. Here's an example of only showing the kana being learnt. In this screenshot, all the hiragana has presumably been learnt, and the "k" line of katakana is being learnt, hence "カ" appearing as katakana, and "ta" and "na" appearing as romaji.


2

This practice is known as 分{わ}かち書{が}き. As you said, it's not really used in normal written Japanese. Spaces, however, are used in texts that are mostly kana based, such as those for kids or for foreigners new to the language. Its purpose is to separate words and to help avoid confusion. Wikipedia gives the example of: こうしまるやさいいち being interpretable as ...


2

カタカナ is most commonly used to write words from a foreign language. And, there is no strict rule to determine whether to write in 漢字 or in ひらがな. These are the most important rules. However, names of animals and plants are a little bit special. In the context of natural science, katakana is used to write them. This is because it is easier to distinguish ...


2

It is clear (really!) that this sign is talking about two brands, one for traditional cards, the other for ("standard"? 52-card) Western cards: [Napoleon] トランプ [福] かるた Given the much greater flexibility with which Japanese characters can be positioned, and still read easily, this just looks like a bit of playfulness, to allow the two trademarks to be ...


1

That is very interesting. I guess that is a style for shape design, but on the other hand, that shows the process of change from right-to-left style to left-to-right style. This is another nameplate of that company. Perhaps, while writing Hiragana, Katakana and Alphabets in a mixed manner, they must had come to be written left-to-right. I apologize that ...


1

Lacking a more scientific corpus of mistakes, I searched Lang-8 for pages that contained both "message" and "massage". I got a number of matches, many of them involving native speakers of languages other than Japanese typing "massage" and being corrected by native speakers of English to say "message". Incidentally, the book title "The Medium is the Massage" ...


1

If the text has been laid out properly by a designer the words will wrap right after the particle for more natural flow (が、を、は etc). For a websites in Japanese, because there is no whitespace between characters the sentence is treated as one 'word' and will break wherever it needs to.



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