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17

This is a summary of this Wikipedia article. A math book called 塵劫記【じんこうき】 published in 1627, was the first book that described (and probably defined) how to count large numbers in Japanese. In the first edition of the book, actually there was no "4-digit grouping" as we know today, at least for relatively small numbers (smaller than 1 極【ごく】). A different ...


9

Numbers in English and most "western" languages are still influenced by Roman numerals, where 1000 = M = mille was the largest number that had its own, non-compound name. Japanese took its numerals originally from Chinese, where there is a separate character for "ten thousand". It also has characters for larger numbers, but groupings of 5 or more are ...


9

Yes, it's common to write in that way. Writing いづみ instead of いずみ and 買ひ instead of 買い are a part of the Historical Kana Orthography (歴史的仮名遣). Writing katakana instead of hiragana is considered more formal in old days. See 歴史的仮名遣 and 片仮名 歴史的仮名遣とは ... 明治から第二次世界大戦終結直後までの公文書や学校教育において用いられたものであり、平安時代初期までの発音を反映した表記であると仮想されたものを基点としている。 The Historical Kana ...


9

There's even an exceptional word which mixes hiragana, katakana, and kanji, くノ一. Generally speaking, words are written with mixed writing systems when there are reasons to write different parts in different ways. (Sounds obvious, huh?) For example, in Tokyo Nagoya's example of あんパン, the first morpheme comes from Chinese 餡{あん}, and the second from ...


7

あんパン(bread roll filled with red bean paste)、 ピザまん(pizza flavored steamed bun)、 じゃがバター(baked/boiled potato topped with butter)、 みそラーメン(ramen with miso based soup)、 エロい(horny)、 ダサい(hickish), etc.


6

The act of assigning kanjis to words that ignore kanji's meaning is called 当て字 (ateji), and that has a long history. According to Wikipedia article on 当て字, this was very common in the past because the language used to rely on Kanji/Hiragana boundary to help distinguish nouns, verbs, etc from particles. The article is full of great examples like 珈琲, 滅茶苦茶, and ...


5

It's always written in hiragana. I can't tell you why though. Allegedly it was named しゃぶしゃぶ because of the sound it makes when you take the beef slice through the hot water twice with your chopsticks. The word しゃぶしゃぶ is never used for other purposes than to refer to the cuisine, at least in contemporary Japan.


5

As far as I know, there's nothing like the Joyo list for Okinawan, so there's no "right" way in that sense. Ryukyu University is probably the closest thing to an authority in this area; I'm pretty sure they would write "カリー サビラ" (note space!). I couldn't find it in their Shuri-Naha dialect dictionary, but they did have "クヮッチー サビラ": ...


5

If we want an authoritative source, we could look at the official terminology used by the Japanese government as set out by the Agency of Cultural Affairs (文化庁) (might be familiar name to some people as their page about 二重敬語 gets referenced here sometimes). They start by saying only to use kanji from 常用漢字表・付表 in the normal form of the character. They go on ...


5

Here are two possible guidelines: Follow existing practice. Write things the same way you see other people do it. The large majority of native speakers have been exposed to a lot of written language, and they can often follow existing practice without putting much thought into it. Not everyone writes everything the same way, so expect to find a fair ...


5

The basic answer is that は is written ハ in katakana. However, I think it depends on why it's written in katakana. One reason you might write something in katakana is to communicate pronunciation, and in this case the particle は would be written ワ: spelling pronunciation おはよう オハヨー こんにちは コンニチワ You can see this sort of use of ...


5

You can see it's ハ as in an old MS office assistant dialog box


5

After reading the first couple of examples in the comments I Googled them and discovered the English Wiktionary actually has an appendix of exactly these terms: Appendix:Japanese words written in mixed kana But they must be quite rare or the appendix very incomplete, because it currently only includes three words (plus one Proper noun): サボる ...


5

Heads up: Some of this is going to be a bit obscure. Wikipedia covers some of this ground; examples consisting of proper names, place names, etc. were checked via Japanese Wikipedia articles. ウィ、ウ、ウェ、ウォ Due to holes in the ワ column (including the general restriction of 「ヲ」 to grammatical duties), 「ウ」can pair with other vowels to replicate /w/ ...


4

The first phonetic spelling of Japanese was using kanji. This system was called man'yōgana, named after the Man'yōshū, an anthology of poems from the Nara period written in this manner. Hiragana and katakana developed as abbreviated forms of these kanji. Although spelling wasn't entirely consistent, and multiple characters were used for individual ...


4

I searched The Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ) using the freely accessible 少納言 tool. I found the following results: (はな|鼻)を?ほじ[ら-ろっ]    8 results (はな|鼻)を?ほじく[ら-ろっ]   4 results (はな|鼻)を?穿[ら-ろっ]     0 results To explain the above, and to explain how to reproduce these results: I used the regular expression pattern (はな|鼻)を?$ ...


4

バグる → (technology) to be buggy, not work correctly; freezing; crashing スマホ、バグッちゃった! → My smartphone froze/crashed/messed up!


4

Yes - the weird one for me was always サボる because it even conjugates normally.


3

in Japan they would think of it as 8912,3889 (八千九百十二万三千八百八十九). Just FYI, no one in Japan writes numbers like that. Maybe you can find a museum or similar re-creation that does it when the tourists are watching, but retail, business, banking, government etc. use western formats. The only place you will regularly see much smaller numbers written in kanji ...


3

If the kanji for that word is not part of the list of joyo kanji, you should probably go for the kana equivalent. The word is already sort of done for you in this sense. The ones that you're already familiar with, like 魚, 鳥, 馬, 牛, etc. are all common, and you were able to come up with them pretty easily. Something like 欅 though... could you read that? No? ...


3

Your Wikipedia knowledge is correct - vertical Japanese is top-to-bottom, right-to-left; and historically (i.e. pre-WWII), horizontal text was treated as a single row of vertical text. This meant that since you start on the right when reading vertically, you started on the right here as well. Most of the time this was restricted to places where text didn't ...


3

I haven't seen a lot of those cases in daily life. I feel like people use English in sentences when they want to add some "fanciness" (for some reason people seem to think it's cool to use English). Like you said in the comments, the only places I can think of where English words are used in Japanese sentences are titles in magazines and TV ads. Although ...


3

They are all variations of the same word. The only difference here is the degree of emphasis and where the emphasis is. For example, "っ" in "すっ" just represents a bit of pause between "す" and "げ". "ぇ", "え", and "ー" all represent dragging of the "げ" sound, but "ー" is longer than "え", and "ぇ" is a very short addition. None is more correct than others, and the ...


2

There's probably too many different reasons why カナ and 漢字 are used / not used in contemporary Japanese. I don't know all the rules, but I will mention two: (1) katakana are used when the 漢字 are considered too hard to write (癌 becomes ガン) and (2) grammatical uses of verbs, i.e. helping verb type uses do not use 漢字. × 出来る  ○ できる × 遊んで見る ○ 遊んでみる × 貰って下さる ○ ...


2

I agree with Axioplase, but 歳 is also とし, which is also the same reading for 年. If I say, "Because I'm getting old," I will use 歳{とし}だから。


2

Looking in dictionaries, it doesn't seem like a hard rule, but I get the impression that while both ほじる and ほじくる are used in the literal sense, to pick or dig, when used in the figurative sense, to pry, usually ほじくる is used. And further that the kanji spelling itself is not used currently. Is this correct? That's a slight modification of what I find: ...


1

I can't replicate that result using mozc, which is a Google-originated IME I use on Linux, or on the standard Windows IME. In both cases they give 芸子 and then 稽古{けいこ} - the latter probably because of words like 朝稽古{あさげいこ}. I think the Google algorithm at some point has managed to confuse 妓 (芸妓) and 姑, perhaps by using some badly OCRed text as input.


1

According to Wikipedia, it would appear that there were in fact a wide range of characters used for any given sound prior to the de-facto standardization that was the creation of the Kana syllabaries (keeping in mind, of course, that at their roots the kana characters are either cursive forms of characters [ひらがな] or isolated elements of characters [カタカナ]). ...


1

Anime characters are often the case since children cannot read kanji. ドラえもん ジャムおじさん タルるート



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