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10

There's a quick way to know this. The place where a space can be inserted is roughly the same place where ね can be naturally inserted. あらわれでたのはね、 くろマントにね、くろいね、ぼうしのね、さんにんぐみ。 それはそれはね、こわーいね、どろぼうさまのね、おでかけだ。 Actually this structure is known as 文節. Basically, a 文節 starts with a noun/adjective/verb/adverb/etc, optionally followed by one or more subsidiary ...


9

In general, if you're storing any Japanese text that needs to be sorted, you probably want to go with Kanatype insensitive. Why would you want it like this? Because it makes sorting more intuitive in terms of Japanese language. In english, since we have only one writing system, it's easy to sort things algorithmically. We simply order the characters by ...


9

To tell the truth, this question was so unexpected for me who am not familiar with colloquial English that I couldn't figure out what it means if it weren't for an English speaker's guidance. Maybe I still don't grasp what you're asking, but there are so many reasons it couldn't be with ン. "Roman" in Japanese In English, Roman is an adjective derives ...


8

I'm Japanese native speaker. In my opinion, little "っ" at the end of sentence is not pronounced at all. However, it often indicates "small" (not so serious) emotions of speaker, I'll show you some example, comparing with other two expressions for writing: 01. ふざけんなよっ 02. ふざけんなよ… 03. ふざけるなよ! (All sentences mean "Don't be silly") As you see, first sentence is ...


8

As with almost anything, there are people who care and others who don't! But it is definitely a thing to consider if you are trying to write well. Degrees of severity There are two angles to this. One is “trivial“, in that the consideration is mostly about legibility, flow, and aesthetics. The other is more consequential, where the “false compound” could ...


8

ありがとうございます is a greeting which was lexicalized long ago, and I don't think it's a good idea to analyze it like this and try to apply the modern style guideline. And while most of the recent style guidelines do say hiragana should be used for auxiliary verbs, this is not a strict rule. Not many people strictly follow this in daily life. I can't say, for ...


7

Using ハ for particle "wa" was a part of their proper style to write official documents or letters at that time. The writing style of 日米和親条約 in your image is [候文]{そうろう・ぶん}, which was a formal writing style during the Edo period. If you would read other 候文 documents or letters written in the Edo period, you would notice that ハ is almost always used for ...


7

When given no context, is it true that both "honey bee" and "dolphin" are written in katakana (instead of hiragana)? Yes, but using hiragana is perfectly acceptable. Names of species is one area where katakana is very often used, but there seem to be no rule to tell which is more widely used to write a specific name. In the examples you mentioned ...


7

Almost nobody cares if you write them in hiragana or kanji. Theoretically, the kanji 私 is only associated with わたくし, whose original meaning is "personal, private". But insisting so in this age only sounds very "spelling police", because the most prevalent usage of わたくし is, after all, as first-person pronoun like its shortened form わたし. Plus, the use of ...


6

I don't know if @l'électeur's comments were rhetorical or otherwise, but I only find the poem as 若葉 (not 落葉) and written by 蕪村 (not 芭蕉). Here's a more reliable reference from 青空文庫 蕪村には直ちに若葉を詠じたるもの十余句あり。皆若葉の趣味を発揮せり。例、 [...] をちこちに滝の音聞く若葉かな [...] It might not be relevant any longer, but the historical spelling for the お in おちる was just お, and not ...


6

I wholeheartedly agree with @Ian's answer. There's absolutely no reason why "honey bee" should have been written in katakana, and "snail" not. In fact, in the BCCWJ mentioned in @Yosh's answer, writing "snail" in katakana is more popular by roughly the same margin: みつばち 70 results ミツバチ 212 results かたつむり 77 results カタツムリ 194 results ("dolphin" ...


6

Because 醒 was not a 常用漢字 until 2010. 覚せい剤取締法 has been around long before that. According to 覚醒剤 - Wikipedia: 覚醒の「醒」が「せい」と表記されるのは、2010年まで常用漢字ではなかったためである And according to 覚せい剤取締法 - Wikipedia: 「醒」の文字は2010年に改定されて常用漢字となり、法律の条文や法律名を除き一般名詞としては、覚醒の文字を報道でも用いるよう合意がなされている。 麻薬及び向精神薬取締法においては、2013年に表記が覚醒剤に改められている。


5

The document follows consistent rules, if you look at it more closely. Firstly, the document itself is actually highly cursive, both in its kanji and hiragana. After this time and up until 1945, it became standard for treaties and formal documents to be written exclusively in kanji and katakana. The fact that this uses hiragana is a result of its cursive ...


5

Despite your confusion, you're actually asking two distinct questions unrelated to each other. Why 結{けっ}婚{こん} rather than 結{け}っ婚{こん} Because none of affixes involved in this case. Okurigana isn't for marking sound changes. It only clarifies some kind of grammatical meaningful differences caused by conjugation or derivation, or by homographic kun'yomi ...


5

結婚 is a Chinese loanword; 持つ is native Japanese. In chinese loanwords, sometimes final sounds like つ get contracted to っ〜, but because it's still 結{けつ}, the つ is still "part of" the reading. Often 2-kanji words are chinese in origin. In the case of 持って, the っ is a suffix to 持つ's root, 持. 持 on its own doesn't have a つ sound in it. Same goes for 読む -> 読んで. ...


5

Transcription from other languages usually has some arbitrariness, and there are no consensus everyone can agree on. Jawp community has also struggled to build a rule, but the actual management is conducted by first making the article, creating redirects towards that one name, then discussing renaming when someone finds it necessary. As long as you stick to ...


5

In the famicom/NES era, kanji was not available, and many games used some spaces between phrases. Spaces are usually inserted before nouns and verbs, but not before particles. With the aid of spaces Japanese adults can understand kana-only sentences easily, just like in English. Actually native speakers can even read this broken kana-only passage very ...


5

Your alternate hunch is correct I expect, as I've seen it elsewhere (referred to as 'progressive', there, but I'm not sure if that's a universal term).


4

There are three differences rhythm たんい has three morae ("syllables"), where as たに has only two. sound たんい has a uvular ("nasal") /ɴ/, i.e. [ta.ɴ.i], whereas たに has a "normal" /n/, i.e. [ta.ni]. pitch たんい【HLL】 drops in pitch after the first mora, たに【LH】 drops in pitch after the second mora. Try to listen for all three differences, they're all important. ...


4

It's done because it makes it easier to read and understand when no kanji are used. Easy to read (general usage) [青]{あお}くて[小]{ちい}さな[僕]{ぼく}の[椅子]{いす}。 Normal(this question) アオくて ちいさな ぼくのイス。 Hard to read (hard to understand) あおくて ちいさな ぼくのいす。 Hardest to read (this might not be understandable) あおくてちいさなぼくのいす。 Impossible to read ...


4

They're mostly interchangeable. If you want to be nit-picky, 交替 is for regularly occurring changes, and 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule.


4

Some people argue that the use of "障害者" is politically incorrect, because the kanji "害" has the meaning like "to harm". Because of this, there has been shift to "障がい", especially in media and official documents. It seems 障がい was first seen in 1990s on newspapers. On the other hand, some people think that it is oversensitive, and that the mixture of kanji and ...


4

It is 篆書 (Mandarin //tʂʷan ʂu//), and more precisely it is 小篆 (Mandarin //ɕʲɑu tʂʷan//). 篆 means write, seal 書 means write/writing, books etc. 小 means tiny, small. There exists another kind of 篆書 is called 大篆 (大 "big, huge"). The Chinese written in the top-right corner are 枝頭覓春. 枝 branch, twig 頭 head, top 覓 find, search, seek, get 春 spring (the season) ...


4

There are basic rules about the use of commas in Japanese but these are not absolute. I think a writer can use commas as they like to make a sentence easier to read. And I don't think there is a clear rule in Japanese as you say.


3

In modern (and medieval) Greek, Χριστος is pronounced /xristos/. The [h] in ハ is the closest Japanese can come to [x]. Compare バッハ for German /bax/. It's not ヒ, because that would represent [ç] (I imagine German 'ich' [iç] would be transcribed イッヒ). It's not フ, because that would represent [f] or [ϕ]. It's not キ, because that would represent [c] or [k]. ...


2

I'm in the translation industry and in my experience if given a list such as yours with no context there is no particular reason those words need to be written in katakana. The English is also inconsistent. Some words are arbitrarily preceded with "a". I think the katakana usage here is the same thing. I hope this helps


2

Because 結 don't have reading of け but けつ and 持て would be ambiguous if it's もって or もて.


2

This practice is known as 分{わ}かち書{が}き. As you said, it's not really used in normal written Japanese. Spaces, however, are used in texts that are mostly kana based, such as those for kids or for foreigners new to the language. Its purpose is to separate words and to help avoid confusion. Wikipedia gives the example of: こうしまるやさいいち being interpretable as ...


2

Yes. Here's an example of only showing the kana being learnt. In this screenshot, all the hiragana has presumably been learnt, and the "k" line of katakana is being learnt, hence "カ" appearing as katakana, and "ta" and "na" appearing as romaji.


1

Lacking a more scientific corpus of mistakes, I searched Lang-8 for pages that contained both "message" and "massage". I got a number of matches, many of them involving native speakers of languages other than Japanese typing "massage" and being corrected by native speakers of English to say "message". Incidentally, the book title "The Medium is the Massage" ...



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