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9

There's even an exceptional word which mixes hiragana, katakana, and kanji, くノ一. Generally speaking, words are written with mixed writing systems when there are reasons to write different parts in different ways. (Sounds obvious, huh?) For example, in Tokyo Nagoya's example of あんパン, the first morpheme comes from Chinese 餡{あん}, and the second from ...


9

Yes, it's common to write in that way. Writing いづみ instead of いずみ and 買ひ instead of 買い are a part of the Historical Kana Orthography (歴史的仮名遣). Writing katakana instead of hiragana is considered more formal in old days. See 歴史的仮名遣 and 片仮名 歴史的仮名遣とは ... 明治から第二次世界大戦終結直後までの公文書や学校教育において用いられたものであり、平安時代初期までの発音を反映した表記であると仮想されたものを基点としている。 The Historical Kana ...


7

We sometimes write 「な!?」,「なっ!?」or「なっ・・・!?」(These three will be pronounced the same way) to mean 「なにっ!?」or「何!?」. Probably it's like "Wha...!?" or "What the...!?". We also sometimes write 「え゛っ!」in place of「えっ!」 to add emphasis, but the 「゛」([濁点]{だくてん}) won't change/affect the pronunciation, so it'd be impossible to pronounce 「な゛」or「え゛」 correctly (I don't know ...


6

The act of assigning kanjis to words that ignore kanji's meaning is called 当て字 (ateji), and that has a long history. According to Wikipedia article on 当て字, this was very common in the past because the language used to rely on Kanji/Hiragana boundary to help distinguish nouns, verbs, etc from particles. The article is full of great examples like 珈琲, 滅茶苦茶, and ...


5

The basic answer is that は is written ハ in katakana. However, I think it depends on why it's written in katakana. One reason you might write something in katakana is to communicate pronunciation, and in this case the particle は would be written ワ: spelling pronunciation おはよう オハヨー こんにちは コンニチワ You can see this sort of use of ...


5

After reading the first couple of examples in the comments I Googled them and discovered the English Wiktionary actually has an appendix of exactly these terms: Appendix:Japanese words written in mixed kana But they must be quite rare or the appendix very incomplete, because it currently only includes three words (plus one Proper noun): サボる ...


5

Heads up: Some of this is going to be a bit obscure. Wikipedia covers some of this ground; examples consisting of proper names, place names, etc. were checked via Japanese Wikipedia articles. ウィ、ウ、ウェ、ウォ Due to holes in the ワ column (including the general restriction of 「ヲ」 to grammatical duties), 「ウ」can pair with other vowels to replicate /w/ ...


4

For 静か and 暖かい, the か is a fossilised grammatical element (cf. 静まる and 暖まる, which don't have it). As for 大きい, it's written with き to differentiate it from 大い, which is a 形容動詞 (albeit with a similar meaning). 小さい's case is a little less clear, since while there is a word that's written 小い, it's a very informal word (ちっこい) typically written with kana. It may ...


3

They are all variations of the same word. The only difference here is the degree of emphasis and where the emphasis is. For example, "っ" in "すっ" just represents a bit of pause between "す" and "げ". "ぇ", "え", and "ー" all represent dragging of the "げ" sound, but "ー" is longer than "え", and "ぇ" is a very short addition. None is more correct than others, and the ...


3

Your Wikipedia knowledge is correct - vertical Japanese is top-to-bottom, right-to-left; and historically (i.e. pre-WWII), horizontal text was treated as a single row of vertical text. This meant that since you start on the right when reading vertically, you started on the right here as well. Most of the time this was restricted to places where text didn't ...


2

re: カ (katakana) and 力 (kanji) Well, I can normally distinguish them quite well. Now, that is. When you draw an imaginary basic bottom line to the kana per line, the chikara kanji normally looks a bit as if it is too far below, by fractions of an inch; whilst the katakana ka does not cross that line by any means. Hmm, do I have some back up? Yes I do. I had ...


2

I haven't seen a lot of those cases in daily life. I feel like people use English in sentences when they want to add some "fanciness" (for some reason people seem to think it's cool to use English). Like you said in the comments, the only places I can think of where English words are used in Japanese sentences are titles in magazines and TV ads. Although ...


1

According to Wikipedia, it would appear that there were in fact a wide range of characters used for any given sound prior to the de-facto standardization that was the creation of the Kana syllabaries (keeping in mind, of course, that at their roots the kana characters are either cursive forms of characters [ひらがな] or isolated elements of characters [カタカナ]). ...



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