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18

This is a summary of this Wikipedia article. A math book called 塵劫記【じんこうき】 published in 1627, was the first book that described (and probably defined) how to count large numbers in Japanese. In the first edition of the book, actually there was no "4-digit grouping" as we know today, at least for relatively small numbers (smaller than 1 極【ごく】). A different ...


9

Numbers in English and most "western" languages are still influenced by Roman numerals, where 1000 = M = mille was the largest number that had its own, non-compound name. Japanese took its numerals originally from Chinese, where there is a separate character for "ten thousand". It also has characters for larger numbers, but groupings of 5 or more are ...


7

The expression 「[目]{め}を[細]{ほそ}める」 (with 目, not [眼]{め}) already has two meanings to begin with. Literal: "to squint" Figurative: "to smile in delight (at the sight of something/someone one is fond of)" Which one it means should be clear from the context as the two meanings are quite different from each other. However, some people would choose to ...


7

If we want an authoritative source, we could look at the official terminology used by the Japanese government as set out by the Agency of Cultural Affairs (文化庁) (might be familiar name to some people as their page about 二重敬語 gets referenced here sometimes). They start by saying only to use kanji from 常用漢字表・付表 in the normal form of the character. They go on ...


6

Here are two possible guidelines: Follow existing practice. Write things the same way you see other people do it. The large majority of native speakers have been exposed to a lot of written language, and they can often follow existing practice without putting much thought into it. Not everyone writes everything the same way, so expect to find a fair ...


5

It's always written in hiragana. I can't tell you why though. Allegedly it was named しゃぶしゃぶ because of the sound it makes when you take the beef slice through the hot water twice with your chopsticks. The word しゃぶしゃぶ is never used for other purposes than to refer to the cuisine, at least in contemporary Japan.


5

As far as I know, there's nothing like the Joyo list for Okinawan, so there's no "right" way in that sense. Ryukyu University is probably the closest thing to an authority in this area; I'm pretty sure they would write "カリー サビラ" (note space!). I couldn't find it in their Shuri-Naha dialect dictionary, but they did have "クヮッチー サビラ": ...


4

The first phonetic spelling of Japanese was using kanji. This system was called man'yōgana, named after the Man'yōshū, an anthology of poems from the Nara period written in this manner. Hiragana and katakana developed as abbreviated forms of these kanji. Although spelling wasn't entirely consistent, and multiple characters were used for individual ...


4

I searched The Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese (BCCWJ) using the freely accessible 少納言 tool. I found the following results: (はな|鼻)を?ほじ[ら-ろっ]    8 results (はな|鼻)を?ほじく[ら-ろっ]   4 results (はな|鼻)を?穿[ら-ろっ]     0 results To explain the above, and to explain how to reproduce these results: I used the regular expression pattern (はな|鼻)を?$ ...


4

Transcription from other languages usually has some arbitrariness, and there are no consensus everyone can agree on. Jawp community has also struggled to build a rule, but the actual management is conducted by first making the article, creating redirects towards that one name, then discussing renaming when someone finds it necessary. As long as you stick to ...


4

There are three differences rhythm たんい has three morae ("syllables"), where as たに has only two. sound たんい has a uvular ("nasal") /ɴ/, i.e. [ta.ɴ.i], whereas たに has a "normal" /n/, i.e. [ta.ni]. pitch たんい【HLL】 drops in pitch after the first mora, たに【LH】 drops in pitch after the second mora. Try to listen for all three differences, they're all important. ...


3

It's done because it makes it easier to read and understand when no kanji are used. Easy to read (general usage) [青]{あお}くて[小]{ちい}さな[僕]{ぼく}の[椅子]{いす}。 Normal(this question) アオくて ちいさな ぼくのイス。 Hard to read (hard to understand) あおくて ちいさな ぼくのいす。 Hardest to read (this might not be understandable) あおくてちいさなぼくのいす。 Impossible to read ...


3

If the kanji for that word is not part of the list of joyo kanji, you should probably go for the kana equivalent. The word is already sort of done for you in this sense. The ones that you're already familiar with, like 魚, 鳥, 馬, 牛, etc. are all common, and you were able to come up with them pretty easily. Something like 欅 though... could you read that? No? ...


3

I haven't seen a lot of those cases in daily life. I feel like people use English in sentences when they want to add some "fanciness" (for some reason people seem to think it's cool to use English). Like you said in the comments, the only places I can think of where English words are used in Japanese sentences are titles in magazines and TV ads. Although ...


3

It is the hiragana だ, which is pronounced as da. You should keep a hiragana table and a katakana table nearby if you are just starting out.


3

in Japan they would think of it as 8912,3889 (八千九百十二万三千八百八十九). Just FYI, no one in Japan writes numbers like that. Maybe you can find a museum or similar re-creation that does it when the tourists are watching, but retail, business, banking, government etc. use western formats. The only place you will regularly see much smaller numbers written in kanji ...


2

In usual handwriting, kana often turn out smaller than full-fledged kanji, especially kanji with many strokes. (Though practising writing both kanji and kana the same size is probably an important step towards achieving a nice balance between kanji and kana size.) Some fonts have comparatively small katakana, which I find very easy to read. This is from ...


2

This probably varies from person to person, at least a little bit, but generally each character should be approximately the same size as any others (i.e. full-width). If you don't, especially with katakana (which are formed from pieces of kanji), you can end up with situations where you cannot tell whether something is kana or kanji. For example メリ vs ...


2

I agree with Axioplase, but 歳 is also とし, which is also the same reading for 年. If I say, "Because I'm getting old," I will use 歳{とし}だから。


2

Looking in dictionaries, it doesn't seem like a hard rule, but I get the impression that while both ほじる and ほじくる are used in the literal sense, to pick or dig, when used in the figurative sense, to pry, usually ほじくる is used. And further that the kanji spelling itself is not used currently. Is this correct? That's a slight modification of what I find: ...


1

単{たん}is pronounced たん and 位{い}is pronounced い. Together, they are pronounced たんい or tann-i. This is distinctly different from に or ni. For example, 谷{たに}is pronounced たに or tani. I don't know phonetic symbols so I apologize but you can sound these two out to hear how they are different.


1

There is no strict general guidelines, and notation in katakana is somewhat arbitrary especially for new words. I found a guideline written by Ministry of Education, but it is not intended for technical terms and leaves some arbitrariness even for non-technical terms. That said, there are conventions. A window on a wall is “ウインドー”, and a rectangle area on a ...


1

Kanji were brought to Japan about 4th centry from China. Hiragana are phonetic characters created from Chinese readings of kanji in around the eighth century in Japan. For example, あ was created from 安 and い was created from 以. Katakana were mainly created by Japanese scholars from Chinese readings of kanji at the same time that hiragana were created. For ...



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