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6

I wholeheartedly agree with @Ian's answer. There's absolutely no reason why "honey bee" should have been written in katakana, and "snail" not. In fact, in the BCCWJ mentioned in @Yosh's answer, writing "snail" in katakana is more popular by roughly the same margin: みつばち 70 results ミツバチ 212 results かたつむり 77 results カタツムリ 194 results ("dolphin" ...


6

When given no context, is it true that both "honey bee" and "dolphin" are written in katakana (instead of hiragana)? Yes, but using hiragana is perfectly acceptable. Names of species is one area where katakana is very often used, but there seem to be no rule to tell which is more widely used to write a specific name. In the examples you mentioned ...


5

Despite your confusion, you're actually asking two distinct questions unrelated to each other. Why 結{けっ}婚{こん} rather than 結{け}っ婚{こん} Because none of affixes involved in this case. Okurigana isn't for marking sound changes. It only clarifies some kind of grammatical meaningful differences caused by conjugation or derivation, or by homographic kun'yomi ...


5

結婚 is a Chinese loanword; 持つ is native Japanese. In chinese loanwords, sometimes final sounds like つ get contracted to っ〜, but because it's still 結{けつ}, the つ is still "part of" the reading. Often 2-kanji words are chinese in origin. In the case of 持って, the っ is a suffix to 持つ's root, 持. 持 on its own doesn't have a つ sound in it. Same goes for 読む -> 読んで. ...


4

Some people argue that the use of "障害者" is politically incorrect, because the kanji "害" has the meaning like "to harm". Because of this, there has been shift to "障がい", especially in media and official documents. It seems 障がい was first seen in 1990s on newspapers. On the other hand, some people think that it is oversensitive, and that the mixture of kanji and ...


2

I'm in the translation industry and in my experience if given a list such as yours with no context there is no particular reason those words need to be written in katakana. The English is also inconsistent. Some words are arbitrarily preceded with "a". I think the katakana usage here is the same thing. I hope this helps


2

Because 結 don't have reading of け but けつ and 持て would be ambiguous if it's もって or もて.



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