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3

"With a repetitive (and mechanical) flopping sound" would be my own definition. At least, that should capture the essence of the onomatopoeia in the given context.


2

It’s hard for me to translate 案外役に立つ事がコロッと転がってたりする into Japanese, but I take it in the meaning of “You’ll find something lying before you just casually, which turns out to be helpful to you later in an unexpected way. コロッと is a colloquial variation of コロリと. コロリ is an onomatopoeia or ideo-phone to describe the status of something / someone dropping, falling, ...


3

This コロッと isn't really describing the quality of the thing itself, I mean, it is, but much more reflecting the speaker's impression or observation. In your example, 転がっている alone can fully depict the situation, "it's lying on the ground". The remainder, コロッと and ~たりする both represent the speaker's mood. コロッと implies (of course not round or rolling-ness here) ...


3

That 「と」 must be written in hiragana because it is a particle. You have no choice here. The 「と」 turns the preceding word 「コロッ」 into an adverb form so that it can modify the verb phrase 「[転]{ころ}がってたりする」. 「ころっ/コロッ」 is a colloquial and onomatopoeic "word"; therefore, it is not very important whether you write it in hiragana or katakana. You have a choice ...


0

It's not an answer to your question directly but out of interest "!" does have a reading in both English and Japanese. In English it can be read as bang' and in Japanese it can be read as ビックリ.


0

It depends on the clock. For a big tower clock, it's ビーン・ボーン, with one of each for each peal. For a small radio clock, ピー is probably an appropriate rendition, and for a water clock, カタッン might very well be the way to go. Ultimately, there's no entirely right answer, and it very much depends on the context in particular and specifically. Simply reading it ...


0

I have seen this mark "!" used in an old English language comic, albeit translated from French. It was used to denote the sound of the pips of the official clock one could telephone (the service may well still exist). I imagine if you had to verbalise the pip tones in Japanese you would say 「ピー」



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