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9

It is not 100 percent clear, but I will try to list up the many theories that have been established: Japanese does not have as many verbs as other languages to express subtle nuances of an action. For example, in English, we can say daddle, waddle, trudge and toddle, whereas in Japanese, you would express these nuances with mimetic words like ...


8

I didn't exactly say that ぴかぴか comes from ひかり (originally pronounced pikari), but rather that ひかり itself seems to be 擬態語. That is, pikari may come from pika which may have been used to mean 'shining' back in the old days just as it is today. I don't have time now to search for the etymology of the specific words you gave me here, but as far as I can tell, ...


6

"ごう" is an onomatopoeic word and you know that the fire blazes furiously. Japanese can hear sound of "ごう" from furiously burning fire. "ごうと音がして" could be translated into "with a roar".


6

ごうと音 is a sound, a short version of ごうごうと meaning "thundering". The full sentence then would be something like ごうと音がして、魔女の手の中で火炎が燃え盛る。 There was a thundering sound and fire blazed from the hands of the witch. The と indicates that ごう is used as adverb.


6

I am going to post a rather simplistic answer just covering the basics.  There are cases (1) where adding a 「と」 is appropriate, (2) where adding a 「と」 is inappropriate, and (3) where only adding a 「に」, not a 「と」 is appropriate. 1) When an onomatopoeia functions adverbially to modify a verb, a 「と」 is often added. In very informal speech, on the ...


6

"きゅんきゅん" is a onomatopoeia(オノマトペ) in Japanese. "きゅんきゅん" denotes that someone is felt or moved someone's mind by palpitation of falling faint love. Compare it to feeling after read through Japanese manga "君に届け", English novel "The Gift of the Magi". Nowadays, "きゅんきゅん" also means the feeling like "kawaii".


5

I just had a look in Shogakukan's Kokugo Dai Jiten Dictionary. The ポイ in ポイ捨て is pretty clearly the adverb ぽい(と). ぽい(と) in turn appears to be a variation from ぷい(と), itself a variation of ふい(と), related to adverb ふ(と). Onomatopoeitically, ふい and ふ even sound a bit like something rushing through, possibly related to verb 吹【ふ】く "to blow", and indeed, even ...


5

It's always written in hiragana. I can't tell you why though. Allegedly it was named しゃぶしゃぶ because of the sound it makes when you take the beef slice through the hot water twice with your chopsticks. The word しゃぶしゃぶ is never used for other purposes than to refer to the cuisine, at least in contemporary Japan.


5

It is not ビ and シッ but a single word ビシッ. It is a 擬態語 signifying firmness of an action. From びしっと in Daijirin: [2] 厳しいさま。ぴしゃりと。 びしっと断る (my translation: reject flatly) In your example, both ビシッ and the raised finger have the effect of showing that the character in the panel is stating her opinion firmly as if it were an objective fact.


5

I don't know who told you that each only went with one, but I don't think that's true. I have most definitely heard お腹【おなか】used with both verbs. And Google seems to agree (100ks hits for either). 腹【はら】is less common in any case, and 腹空いた【はらすいた】 sounds a little unusual, but Google still gives over 60k results for it, so I doubt it could be considered ...


4

I use ふむ as well. Seldom ふむふむ. I think that's true for many people. I don't know how to put this well, but basically it sounds a bit.. um.. ridiculous maybe? You see it often in manga.


4

Friends and I quite often use "ふむ" (just once) in electronic communications in order to show acknowledgement, though with a very slight nuance of reluctance or thoughtful consideration. Here's an example from a native Japanese speaker, after hearing about the context of a quiproquo: ふむ。誤解されやすい書き方をしたので間違えて解釈されちゃったんだろう。 Though it's not "I know", it's ...


4

Maybe it's a regional thing, but お腹減った [おなかへった] isn't weird at all. In fact, I hear and use it a lot. On the other hand, 腹空いた [はらすいた] sounds weird and I don't think I've ever heard it before.


4

I'm not Japanese, but as far as I know 「むぎゅむぎゅ」depicts squeezing something softly probably more than once as Sawa pointed out. I think you can use it in relation to some texture that has elasticity. The context it is used in can be cute, but is not limited to it. For instance, you see 「むぎゅむぎゅ」used to describe how the dough of a bagel feels. However, it is ...


4

っと means for a short time. for example きらきら is sparkling all the time but きらっと means it just sparkled for a moment. And it's same for others too. What you are mistaken is that we write 擬態語 in Hiragana (平仮名 (I wasn't sure if I wrote the English part right so I wrote it in Japanese)) and that we write 擬音語 in Katakana (片仮名). And for for 擬音語 we don't usually ...


4

Zokugo-dict says that the word ポイ捨て (litter) is a contraction of ポイと捨てる. And ポイと is an adverb meaning "carelessly/nonchalantly" (throw away/toss aside). It seems that now ポイ捨て got further contracted into just ポイ.


4

I probably found this too late for my answer to be of interest, but I think I can shed some light on the mystery. The phrase used is a paraphrase of a line from a well-known (to Japanese children at least) song from Sore Ike Anpanman. I am not sure of the song's name, but the first line is 勇気の鈴がりんりんりん and it was played as the ending theme of many episodes ...


3

ガアアアア ("gaaaaa") implies more of an engine sound than the screeching tires I would associate with drifting.


3

I agree with Chocolate that it is 擬態語. Thus if I understand correctly it is a sibling of onomatopoeia, but not quite the same thing, because ヘニャッ doesn't come from sound. The mental picture this word should evoke is something soft that buckles or collapses. So in the context of what you provided, I think it's a (tired) human body that buckles (onto the lap ...


2

Someone pointed out to me that all of the "H" group sounds (is there a name for them?) are laughing sounds. I forgot what the nuances were, but I'll refer to this Pera Pera Penguin's 5-minute Japanese Class by Hitomi Hirayama. はははは - normal laugh ひひひひひ - conniving laugh ふふふふふ - creepy laugh; feminine laugh へへへへへ - shy laugh ほほほほほ - [elder] ...


2

As with any mimetic word in Japanese, the meaning is strongly connected to how one would imagine an action would sound like. Considering the context of "wanting to be spoiled or pampered", it can be related to letting go of all muscular control and folding up or lying flat like a sheet of dough (as opposed to something that has bones and joints). If we ...


1

Near as I can tell, it's neither. It rather appears to be the totality of sound emitted by the car travelling at speed, as experienced by an external observer; akin to the sound you would hear as a car travels past you while standing near a road.


1

It's either ダダー or ダタッ. Given that if it were a ー on the end then it would probably be horizontally aligned with the other characters, I'm going to assume it's a ツ, and because ダタツ doesn't seem to make much sense as onomatopoeia, it should be a ッ (small-tsu). Given that it looks like a kind of shorter 'impact' sound and not something extended or ringing, I ...


1

I think Sexy Commando says either "ふむふむ、なるなる..." or"なるふむなるふむ" while reading a newspaper in one episode. Obviously, this is a humorous use. BTW, I have a great related oyaji gag: I put out my hand to see if it was raining. By chance, a bird flew overhead just then and dropped some poop, which fell into my hand. I looked at it and said ふーーん?



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