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15

First, concurring with Axioplase: だく is for tangible things, いだく is for abstract things. (Daijisen has a usage note under 抱える that deals with this distinction.) With regards to your second question, yes, だく can have the connotation of "sleep with" (second sense in the Daijisen definition for 抱く). It's a somewhat "nicer" way to say "sleep with" in the sense ...


14

Well, first, I think that うだく is archaic, as I read it: 〔上代語「むだく」の転で、「だく」の古形。平安鎌倉時代の漢文訓読にだけ見える語〕 Then, だく seems to be use for concrete situations, when you really use your hands. いだく seems to be a more literary reading, or used in abstract situations, like 「理想を―・く」「不安を―・く」. This is exactly your sentence, isn't it? Sources: on-line dictionaries ...


13

If you hit the end of line, and you're out of space, yes, you can freely split kanji and their okurigana. I have a novel right in front of me that does it two lines in a row on the second page: 彼女と初 // めて会った 思 // い出してみるがいいよ. Wikipedia says that the rules governing line-splitting in Japanese are called 禁則【きんそく】処理【しょり】, and there are slight variations in ...


9

Even though they are both used, there is an official one and those that are not. When you consider the history of kanji incorporation into Japanese, first, there were Chinese writings. Then, people tried to read them as Japanese. Two techniques appeared: (i) kaeri-ten, which marks how the Chinese characters in the original Chinese writing are to be ...


8

Verbs and い-adjectives may be inflected with different okurigana For example, the verb 歩く may be inflected to form: polite: 歩きます negative: 歩かない polite negative: 歩きません past tense: 歩いた past polite: 歩きました negative past: 歩かなかった negative past polite: 歩きませんでした te form: 歩いて desiderative: 歩きたい volitional: 歩こう polite volitional (cohortative): 歩きましょう plain negative ...


7

Your question assumes that people typically learn the kanji, for instance 歩, and then go on to try to figure out what extra meaning the okurigana impart on the kanji -- for instance, the addition of く creates a verb 歩く "to walk", and the addition of いた to 歩 creates the past tense verb "walked". This is not the typical approach. The typical approach is to ...


7

I agree that this is very difficult. One way I've found that usually works is to use context to determine the correct reading. Often one of the readings will have specific nuances that the others don't, so the context of the sentence can help you out. One example that I personally encounter all the time is 汚れる. It can be read as both よごれる and けがれる. They ...


6

I don't know if I should bring over my answer from the Linguistics SE or not. In my experience, you can split anywhere between characters (including okurigana), but it is still best to keep words together. Sometimes there is really little choice but to split between the characters in a word. However, as long as one is able, words should not be split. In ...


6

Since the kanji part of both verbs and adjective is the part conveying the root meaning of this particular adjective form, the okurigana (i.e. everything that follows the part written in kanji) is rarely composed of anything else except for derivation and conjugation suffixes. Conjugation suffixes are easy enough, and I doubt they pose any problem for you. ...


6

Other than brute-force memorization (棒暗記), the only thing I can suggest is material regarding the Kanji-Kentei (漢検), because I know some of the (lower?) levels focus on 送り仮名. Some materials I have are books of tests from previous years (問題集), and a Nintendo DS 漢検 game. However, I got all of this in Japan, so I don't know how accessible this kind of stuff ...


6

I had the same question as you a long time ago, and at the time a translator friend gave me the following explanation. With these kinds of compounds (I always forget if they're compound verbs or something else, so forgive me that I'm lacking terminology), writing with okurigana or not is equally fine. The reason the okurigana can be omitted is that those ...


5

「[一]{ひと}」 is the number while 「[一]{ひと}つ」 is the count. 「~つ」 is used as a "generic" counter for counts less than 10 when the actual counter is unknown. 一つの林檎をください 一果の林檎をください


5

Would it surprise you if I told you that you are likely to have been using Japanese words of the same structure as 「開け口」 for years already --- 「[着物]{きもの}」,「[焼]{や}き[鳥]{とり}」, 「[食]{た}べ[物]{もの}」, etc. The structure is "[連用形]{れんようけい} of a verb + Noun". It is as simple as that. 「[開け口]{あけぐち}」= The 連用形 of the verb [開]{あ}ける, which is [開]{あ}け + The noun [口]{くち} = ...


4

For 静か and 暖かい, the か is a fossilised grammatical element (cf. 静まる and 暖まる, which don't have it). As for 大きい, it's written with き to differentiate it from 大い, which is a 形容動詞 (albeit with a similar meaning). 小さい's case is a little less clear, since while there is a word that's written 小い, it's a very informal word (ちっこい) typically written with kana. It may ...


4

I'm suspecting you're confusing two different things, morphological rules and orthographic rules. Okurigana do not have any semantic meaning per se. That would not be a logical way to think about it. They attach to the kanji, thereby creating a word which has a reading and a meaning.


3

The gist: There is a kind of computerized kanji input system that puts you back in charge of which letter to write in Kanji and which one in Kana. Namely, SKK. With SKK, you can actively learn okurigana rules even when writing text on the computer. Basically, SKK converts words one by one (single-word conversion), without analysing syntax or grammar. ...


2

When I was taught vocabulary, in some cases I was given words with okuriganas, in some cases without, and in exams, getting the okuriganas wrong would be blamed. Based on this education, my answer is: "Yes there is a difference: one of the two spellings is correct, and there is no rule telling you which one it is."


2

First of all, are the meanings correct? Yes, you are right. Then, after a quick search, I found out that okurigana is efficient to disambiguate them. Didn't the author mean furigana instead? Yes, he's wrong. Lastly, what are the most important (to know)/most frequent homographic Kanji out there? Err, all the X中, where 中 is read ちゅう or じゅう. ...



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