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16

Why is the Japanese government considering adding kanji such as “cancer” to the jinmeiyō kanji? I do not think that the government is trying to add these kanji to the set of jinmeiyō kanji. I think that some people are confused by the unclear description in Wikipedia. At least I was confused at first. So probably it is useful to clarify it. Article ...


15

I am ハーフ, and for what it's worth the term has never caused me to take offense, nor did it seem like any was ever intended. When I was in elementary school in Japan, if I got into scuffles, the preferred label was 外人, though not even that is necessarily offensive outside of the context of a schoolyard spat. In short, if you aren't immediately offended by ...


8

I believe most Japanese think of Christmas as a secular, commercial holiday (gift giving, christmas decorations, etc) rather than a religious celebration of the birth of Christ, so I would think that most would not even think to be offended. It might be out of place to say at a religious (Shinto or Buddhist) shrine or celebration, but I would think this ...


7

I do not claim to know the origin of this particular term [小便芸者]{しょんべんげいしゃ} but I have reasons to doubt the male anatomy hypothesis. In the most vulgar kind of Japanese, [小便]{しょんべん} is sometimes added to a noun like a prefix to express the speaker's hatred or strong disrespect of the object. The nuance it carries is much worse than "good for nothing". ...


7

I haven't talked to my lesbian friend in a long time, but I'll offer some words from my memory and from "Japanese Street Slang," by Peter Constantine. レズ - This corresponds to the English dyke, or lesbian. I think it has more of a "dyke" butch feel to it than just plain old lesbian. おたち - "The Japanese equivalent of 'bull dyke', used in lesbian circles, ...


6

You've stepped on a potential land mine of debate there. Whether or not 外人{がいじん} is offensive, politically incorrect, or means something other than just "foreigner" is the topic of a lot of heated debate. Take a look here for the "gaijin is offensive side". Take a look at the Wikipidia entry for links to the "gaijin is just a word" side. Which means that ...


5

I don't know why people are afraid to put forward negative answers... so I'll just do it myself. The phrase seems to almost certainly be just some kind of mistake on the part of the translator and has nothing to do with slang for lesbianism. Also, it is not a common phrase used in any particular way when a woman turns down a man. It's just a really, ...


5

From what I've seen it doesn't seem derogatory. Same goes for the 2nd-generation Japanese from Brazil as well with the word "Nikei" Just make sure you don't say "New Half" as that will surely upset your boss. Edit: Apparently it WAS derogatory back in the day when there weren't many foreigners in Japan, but and thus changed and is no longer seen as a ...


5

I think the difference between the words [家柄, 血筋 and 身分] vs. [上流, 階級, 地位] is what kind of status the words imply. The first group of words refer specifically to what social caste you or your ancestors were born into. This touches upon the 部落民 discrimination and all that unpleasantness. The second group of words though, refer to a more general type of ...


3

The Japanese wikipedia article has an entry on 放送問題用語 which includes some discussion of the different types of words that are considered problematic. It appears there is not a single list that applies to all broadcasters: (from entry on 放送禁止用語 ) 今日の日本には放送禁止用語は正しくは存在せず自主規制のみである (Currently in Japan no "banned words" list exists and there are only ...


3

What did these words mean? 才六, 贅六, 賽六 and 采六 are all the same word written in various kanji. There are several pronunciations: sairoku: most basic and original. zeiroku: Derives from above sairoku. This is how an easterner would pronounce the word. ai > eː is a common phonological change in eastern Japanese. Likely pronounced as zeːroku (zeeroku) ...


3

No, this is not derogatory. We put our culture on top of the word and assume, which is a fair assumption because I don't like using at all, that it is not cool. But I have had this conversation a few times now after seeing old Japanese ladies talk about being half and using the word with the child's parents. I even remember reading about the word in a ...


3

To most Japanese, it is not seen as derogatory. But then, they do a lot of racist things without thinking that it's wrong. If you want a lot of examples, read the blog Loco in Yokohama. He's a black ALT in Japan and he chronicles the things that anger him almost on a daily basis, like the empty circle that surrounds gaijin on trains while the whole rest ...


3

Searching for bagero bakayaro on Google yielded the following quote, a firsthand account of the time when "bagero" appeared on the scene. It cites "bakayaro" as its source word: Thursday, March 26, 1942 ... And for the first time we heard the word "bagero"[24]... [24] Bagero = bakayarō, a strong term of abuse frequently used by Japanese ...


2

外人 means "outsiders" or "strangers", not necessarily foreigners. When this word is used against foreigners, the point of view is set to Japan, and it is presupposed that anything that belongs to outside of Japan, or anything that came from outside of Japan is an "outside(r)" or a "strange(er)". On the other hand, 外国人 means "people from a foreign country" or ...


2

I have no evidence, but I guess what you think is right. This person (be careful with the link; the back button does not work) is saying the same thing. 'Kuntoroyo' sounds close to この野郎 (kono yaroo) 'You bastard!' to me.


2

As an American, it strikes me as incredibly offensive. After all, half is even less than three-fifths. That being said, ハーフ is a perfect example of wasei-eigo; a Japanese word based on English which a native English speaker would either find odd or not be able to make sense of at all. The context that a Japanese person is going to have when using the ...


2

According to 大辞泉{だいじせん} the term came from 丁稚{でっち}, a term used particularly in the area around Kyōto for "shop boy"/apprentice (and also apparently sometimes used as a derogatory term itself). 小僧{こぞう} was the Edo equivalent of 丁稚. The suggested development is this: 丁稚 sounds like 重一, a term from sugoroku where both dice come up as ones. The opposite side ...


1

I can only offer this: レズビアンの男役 literally meaning "male role" in a lesbian pair I suppose we could synthesise レズビアンの女役 for the "female role" but I'm not sure if 女役 is a recognized compound. Either that or レズビアン is by default referring to the female role, and the male role has to be specified. (I am entirely unsure on this so it'll be good if someone ...



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