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25

It's perfectly fine to use only half-width arabic numbers. 2009年6月30日 However, there are other rules in operation, coming from various time in the history of writing and printing: A. Don't use arabic numbers at all - maybe seen in formal documents: 二千九年六月三十日 B. Half-width for two-digit numbers, otherwise full-width - mostly in printed materials: ...


20

The はた there is part of the same series of Japanese readings for numbers as ひとつ、ふたつ、みっつ and so on. Where the ち comes from - that I do not know. It also makes an appearance in some other common words, such as 二十日(はつか), although in a slightly mangled form. There are readings for the tens after that as well - for instance 三十(みそ) makes an appearance in words ...


19

As it turns out, there are Japanese numbers greater than 10! Getting started, let's review the basics: 1 through 9: [一つ]{ひとつ}、[二つ]{ふたつ}、[三つ]{みっつ}、[四つ]{よっつ}、[五つ]{いつつ}、[六つ]{むっつ}、[七つ]{ななつ}、[八つ]{やっつ}、[九つ]{ここのつ} Going above 20, つ changes into そ. Here are the 10s through 90: ...


18

Your book is correct. When talking about human body temperature, 三十 is often omitted, probably because it is obvious. While there is nothing wrong with saying 37度8分 (37.8 degrees Celsius), it is often abbreviated to 7度8分. Even 37度 (37 degrees Celsius) without a fractional part sometimes becomes 7度. You cannot abbreviate the temperature when it is 40 ...


17

We normally say [三十分]{さんじゅっぷん}. Some people say [半時間]{はんじかん}, but I think it's only used in Kansai area. 参考に・・→ OKWave「半時間って方言ですか」 P.S. I'm from Kyoto but actually I've never noticed any of my friends say 半時間... Most of them are in/from Kyoto, Osaka, or Shiga. I think it's more used by older people (probably in Osaka?), because the only two people I can ...


17

This is a summary of this Wikipedia article. A math book called 塵劫記【じんこうき】 published in 1627, was the first book that described (and probably defined) how to count large numbers in Japanese. In the first edition of the book, actually there was no "4-digit grouping" as we know today, at least for relatively small numbers (smaller than 1 極【ごく】). A different ...


14

What I can think of is Japanese numbers are using when registration of house, family registrations, and some contracts. But they used 壱 弐 参 拾 萬 instead of ー 二 三 十 万 on those kinds of registrations, contracts to prevent obvious modifications. And according to trade law, session 2, No. 48 「壱、弐、参、拾」 are mandatory. Old books using those Japanese numbers a ...


14

Numbers written with Arabic numerals are usually positional. The place value of each digit depends on its position in the sequence: 1b2 + 2b1 + 3b0 = 123 Numbers written with kanji are typically non-positional. Although they usually appear in the same order, rather than use position alone to indicate their place value, they're generally combined with ...


13

よん is a 訓読み(kunyomi) reading of 4 and し is a 音読み(onyomi). なな is a kunyomi reading of 7 and しち is a onyomi. To make a long story short kunyomi is a native Japanese pronunciation and onyomi are pronunciation that were derived from classical Chinese. In the case of numbers shi and shichi (onyomi) is used when you are counting things. For example, ichi ni ...


12

From experience, I find Japanese people having lots of trouble converting between Japanese and Gregorian calendar years. I regularly surprise people with my ability to do that as follows (Japanese calendar years are often represented with an alphabet character like S or H.): Showa Era (1925 to 1989) Subtract 1900 (e.g. 1976 - 1900 = 76) Subtract 25 (e.g. ...


12

For counting a number of occurrences 回 and 度 are interchangeable with small numbers. Somewhere around 4 (the line is quite vague), 度 becomes uncommon, and by the time you get to 6, 回 is pretty much the only one used. (Naturally, 度 can be used with any number for counting degrees, as noted in Azeworai's informative answer.)


11

“2つ” is just another notation for “二つ,” and is read as ふたつ, although some people consider the notation “2つ” as incorrect.


11

That's called 語呂合わせ and you could find full article at Wikipedia. Quoted from Wikepedia 1 : いち、い、ひとつ、ひと 2 : に、ふたつ、ふた、ふ、つ(英語から)、じ 3 : さん、さ、みっつ、みつ、み 4 : よん、よ、よっつ、し、ふぉ(英語から)、ほ 5 : ご、こ、い、いつつ、いつ 6 : ろく、ろ、むっつ、むつ、む 7 : しち、ななつ、なな、な 8 : はち、は、ぱあ、やっつ、やつ、や、やあ 9 : きゅう、きゅ、く、ここのつ、ここの、こ 0 : ...


11

Here is a good list of numbers in [大和言葉]{やまとことば}. http://www.sf.airnet.ne.jp/~ts/language/number/ancient_japanesej.html Beginning and intermediate Japanese-learners may think that we only use 1-10 from the list in Modern Japanese, but that is not true. For instance, native speakers frequently use these to tell people's ages euphemistically. はたち ...


9

Usually when you count, you use よん for '4' and なな for '7'. That applies to when you count down. じゅう きゅう はち なな ろく ご よん さん に いち However, in some situations, pronouncing a certain sequence of numbers became so frequent end became a fixed expression. In that case, '4' and '7' may be pronounced し and しち, respectively. That includes a situation of counting ...


9

This may be obvious but not has been stated explicitly on this page: in vertical writing, kanji numerals are much more preferred than Arabic numerals. Moreover, in vertical writing, we sometimes use the positional system with kanji, especially for large numbers; that is, 六万五千七百四円 is sometimes written as 六五七〇四円.


9

I believe the most common thing to do with sandwiches is use つ. (サンドイッチを3つもらえますか?) There probably is a correct counter for loaves of bread, but I don't know it, and again I think つ is more common.


9

The article at Wikipedia covers the common ones as well as a decent number of extended ones, and lists the exceptions for days, people, etc. as well as rendaku and number word changes (e.g. 300->san*bya*ku, 4:00-> *yo*ji).


9

The number kanji are included on the list of first grade kanji that all Japanese children, theoretically, should know by they are in the second grade of elementary school. The other kanji you list (except for 日, but they may not cover that reading) are at higher reading levels. It's likely that they made an editorial decision that, well, pretty much any ...


9

It's read as 「24割る8は4」「にじゅうよんわるはちはよん」[nijuu yon waru hachi wa yon]. (I think we often say「24割る8イコール4」「にじゅうよんわるはちイコールよん」[nijuu yon waru hachi ikooru yon] after junior high school...) Wait, 24÷8=...4? Isn't it 3?


9

It is usual to say AからB without まで when you use a range in place of a number, and you repeat units. Therefore, “for two to four hours” is 2時間から4時間. 2時間[乃至]{ないし}4時間 is a very formal way to state the same thing, as ssb stated. Your sentence has a few other incorrect or unnatural points. As oldergod stated, the usage of を is incorrect. The duration of an ...


9

一組 is pronounced in two ways in Japanese for two different meanings. ひとくみ: a pair of ~~, a set of ~~ Examples: ひとくみのカップル、ひとくみのディナーウェアー いちくみ: Group #1 (among multiple groups) Example: Name of class in school (二年一組、六年一組, etc.) 一組 is never officially read いちぐみ, いっくみ or いっぐみ in real life. However, you will once in a while hear people say いっくみ to mean Group ...


9

Numbers in English and most "western" languages are still influenced by Roman numerals, where 1000 = M = mille was the largest number that had its own, non-compound name. Japanese took its numerals originally from Chinese, where there is a separate character for "ten thousand". It also has characters for larger numbers, but groupings of 5 or more are ...


8

Agree with TsuyoshiIto's answer, but would like to complement the answer to Q2. The Japanese years are called 元号 or 年号. There is a law that states that, in official contracts, if the date is written both in 元号 and some other system, then the 元号 description overrides the other in case of contradiction or inconsistency. For this reason, in official document, ...


8

Other than your example 三十一人, I can think of 一人前, 二人前, 二人三脚, 二人羽織. But by itself, I don't think they are read as 'いちにん' or 'ににん'.


8

The English "by" is read 「かける multiply」 in Japanese. A 3x4 matrix, for example, is 「3かける4行列」 in Japanese. I assume your readings are right in the second part of your question, but can't seem to find them anywhere.


8

I think you are making a big miskate. As for 5X4間, you interpret it as 'five rooms by four', but it is not clear what that means, and probably that is wrong. 間 is a traditional unit for length. It is approx the long length of a tatami (about 1.8m). 5X4間 means a 5間 by 4間 rectangle.


8

週一 is a shorthand for 週一回, which means "once per week".


8

Verbs and い-adjectives may be inflected with different okurigana For example, the verb 歩く may be inflected to form: polite: 歩きます negative: 歩かない polite negative: 歩きません past tense: 歩いた past polite: 歩きました negative past: 歩かなかった negative past polite: 歩きませんでした te form: 歩いて desiderative: 歩きたい volitional: 歩こう polite volitional (cohortative): 歩きましょう plain negative ...


8

You're taking the third place (第3位) and you're either throwing it away if it's four or below (四捨) or you add one to the next place if it's five or above (五入). As a result, the third place is gone, and you're only left with two decimal places.



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