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と思っている talks about the current state of things: "is thinking" と思う talks about what will happen or what always happens. cf. ご飯を食べている I am eating. ご飯を食べる I eat (habitually). I will eat. Does that help show why it sounds weird to use 思う in this kind of situation?


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There are a few verbs that do this. It's not just 思う but also 考える. I have a rule that works for me (which I'll learn is wrong if it gets massively down-voted). Think about the following sentences:  × Hiroko thinks to go abroad.  △ Hiroko is thinking to go abroad  ○ Hiroko has been thinking to go abroad  自然 I heard that Hiroko has been ...


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If you are familiar with the general difference between on-readings (音読み) and kun-readings (訓読み), you already know the basic difference between 形【かたち】 (kun) and 形状【けいじょう】 (on). 形 is used in informal conversations/writings and most of formal conversations, while 形状 is preferred in formal written texts or scientific articles. Usually Japanese children learn ...


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Yes, it can. I remember my teacher at school (here in Japan) sometimes using 頑張りましょう when talking about activities that he would not directly take part in. He was however peripherally involved, like being the one setting the test he was referring to with his 頑張りましょう。 I'd say that there needs to be at least a link between the person using this form and the ...


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Xがする is a phrasal verb and is most often used in phrases such as 音がする and 匂い{におい}がする and even 気がする. It is used with words that are about perceiving or sensing something. (More phrasal verbs here.) Yet it does not really require the actual sensing part from the part of the speaker, but instead is a pretty objective way of saying that 'there is a smell' or ...


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Different types of ~そう I think it's best to consider adjective + そう and verb + そう separately, because they have slightly different meanings. In particular, with verbs, そう has the sense of something close to happening or about to happen in the near future, but with adjectives... not really. 雨が降りそうだ。 It looks like it's about to rain. (near future) ...


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Basically, 年休 and 有休 are just the two ways to abbreviate 年次有給休暇. They are usually interchangeable. Strictly speaking, 年休 has more formal, technical nuance, and it specifically refers to 年次有給休暇 as defined in the Japanese law. 有休 is a more casual and popular (and thus ambiguous) word. It's sometimes not limited to 年次有給休暇 and may be confused by any other kind ...


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I also found out that すみません can be used to express "I am sorry" when doing something wrong like unintentionally stepping on someone's foot. And for expressing "pardon" if we don't understand what the interlocutor says I think we can use 'はい?' with rising intonation. And 'はい?' here is a question like "yes?" Or "I'm sorry?".


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区別 and 差別 both carry a mean of "discrimination" but have distinct meanings in Japanese. 区別 is for putting things in different categories or domains, i.e. the ability to distinguish. For instance, the phrase [善悪]{ぜんあく}の区別 = to discriminate between good and evil. 差別 often means discrimination in the pejorative, i.e. to place a [差]{さ}, here meaning ...


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Your sentence is grammatically correct. について is a good way to say "about" in many situations. However, in this case I think it would be more natural to say 今、東京から京都まで行く方法を調べています。 I'm [ looking up / reading about ] how to get from Tokyo to Kyoto. 調べる is often translated to "investigate, examine", but it's a very common word and I think "look up, read ...



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