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1

Your interpretation of 向く and 向ける seems fairly good. While the meaning of these three verbs tend to overlap they are not exactely the same, thus 向く and 向かう are not two verbs for a single concept. Now, let's delve into some details. As you noticed, 向く and 向かう are intransitive and 向ける is transivitive. It is often considered that 向く and 向ける form an ...


1

They are definitely similar and I'm sure most Japanese native speakers do use these interchangeably or wouldn't know the "correct" usage. After reading a few 知恵袋 answers, I can say the following. 「納める」 1. To pay or to make payments(納付、納入). For example お金を納める or 税金を納める. 2. To finish up (おしまいにする), e.g. 仕事納め 3. To place or fit into something (しまい込む) 「収める」 1. ...


1

Another phrase for "reason" is "in order to", which is usually constructed with (の)ために. The shorter version of that is (の)に. 私は日本語の[新聞]{しんぶん}を[読]{よ}むのに[辞書]{じしょ}を[使]{つか}う。 watashi ha nihongo no shinbun wo yomu no ni jisho wo tsukau. In order to read Japanese newspaper, I use a dictionary. That's the grammar point used in your first sentence "sentaku ni ...


0

In these cases a kokugo dictionary really helps. If you're studying for N1, sites like Kotobank will be one of your greatest sources of information: Definition: https://kotobank.jp/word/%E8%87%B3%E3%82%8B-433135#E3.83.87.E3.82.B8.E3.82.BF.E3.83.AB.E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.B3.89


2

就職 means 'getting a job' or 'going into a company' (就 = commit, 職 = job). It is not 就職 but 就職活動 that means 'looking for a job'. 就職活動 and 求職(活動) are similar, but 就職活動 tends to refer to the job hunting done by young hopeful college students. There are many 就職活動情報サイト for students on the net. On the other hand, 求職 sounds like something that is done after some ...


1

In addition to the good answer already given, here's an explanation of the nuance of 見やる. The action of 見やる can be a glance but does not have to be so. The verb 見やる means "see (someone/something) far away" or "look at (someone/something) in the distance." For example, 彼は虎を見た。 this sentence simply tells "He looked at a tiger/tigress." We don't know ...


4

I don't know if 見やる and 見据える are antonyms, but anyway, unfortunately, many of these sentences are not natural, and do not work as you expect. 空を見やった。 Yes, this means "gave the sky a glance". 空を無頓着に見た。 I don't think this sentence is natural because 無頓着 usually means "not to be interested in something people should usually care for." (e.g., ...


3

From my experience living in Japan for 19+ years, I would translate this more as disbelief: "wait, you couldn't have thought that...". Also, have a look at various translations on alc.co.jp, if you haven't already: http://eow.alc.co.jp/search?q=%E3%81%BE%E3%81%95%E3%81%8B&ref=sa. You'll notice they tend to align more with disbelief than surprise


4

Most Sino-Japanese words could originally be used both transitively and intransitively, some even as all verb, noun and adjective, as they are in Classical Chinese. But since they have been more and more Japanized, many of them were assigned a fixed grammatical status like other native words. 完成 is almost exclusively intransitive nowadays. Dictionaries may ...


2

It depends on whether させる is causative or transitive that it means that you make other people do it. Both させる and する can imply that you involve other people. When させる is transitive (not causative), they (する and させる) are the same. But the させる version is more common, especially 完成させる is much more common. If I were to find 文を完成しなさい on Lang-8, I would correct ...


1

家庭 usually refers to the smallest social unit, typically made up of parents and their children who live together. This word on its own never refers to a larger group of families. This question (入ってみたい家庭は?) sounds like a very casual what-if question to me, and translating this as "entering XX clan/lineage" is probably too grandiose, even when 一族 plays an ...


0

I would like to give further information since Mr. Blavius asserts 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule. and per choco san's advice. From this site http://知っ得袋.biz/443.html From the site, 交代・・・役目などが一回限りでかわる時 交替・・・かわって行うことが繰り返されるとき Translated 交代 --- one time change of roles or jobs or plays etc etc, 交替 --- ...


4

They're mostly interchangeable. If you want to be nit-picky, 交替 is for regularly occurring changes, and 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule.


4

じゃ is the contraction of では. It's a contraction, because じゃ is one mora (one unit length) and では is two moras long. じゃ is frequently used as contraction of では, especially in じゃない < ではない. As pointed out before by one of our native speakers on this site (@l'électeur), じゃありません is at risk of being overused by learners. Presumably, because the uncontracted では ...


5

取る is simply to take, whether or not anyone else is involved. 受け取る is to take something that has been offered, given or handed to you. In the case of your example, it sounds as though someone else (I assume whoever he asked the question to, the author I suppose) handed the orange peel to him, and he reached out and took it. If it had been simply 取る, he ...


0

I'm pretty sure it simply means that he was always curious, but he never thought he would actually allow his thoughts to become actions in that way. Or he really had no idea why he did it, but instead of telling the girl that, he made something up to tease her. I don't know the context beyond what you shared, but I think you are overthinking it haha. It ...



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