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If there are several uses for the 〜ようにする construct, then I could be way off... but here is one explanation from an N3 grammar study book* that I have been using: 〜ようにする Expresses the act of making an effort to do something habitually. Example 健康のために、野菜を食べるようにしています。 I try to eat more vegetables for the sake of my health. Edit: On the same ...


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I agree with the comments from the other two answers. I am not sure how useful this will be but as I looked into guidance on acceptable sentence endings a little while ago (in particular when the zero copula, の and か can be used) you might be interested to see what I found for “question statements”. As I already had them I have kept のか? and だ in but by all ...


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I'd say that the ones you've picked are pretty regular semantically. ~? and ですか?are simple yes/no questions used when you have no prior information one way or the other. You can also use them to confirm that you heard correctly. なの? and なんですか? tie the question in with the discourse or prior assumptions. You've heard or gotten some hint that e.g. he's a ...


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For a confoirmation to 彼は医者になった, both 医者? or 医者なの? work. But the formar is more associated with nuance of "Huh? Perdon me?" while the latter has more to do with surprise. きれい? or 上手? are fine. For a reply to「彼氏は病院で働いてる」, it's 彼は医者[○?  ○なの?] though the latter has more sense of inference. As a normal question (e.g."Excuse me, do you have a boyfriend who is a ...


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We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...


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It depends on how it is used. If the customer had made all the orders, and the waiter is making a confirmation going through the orders, and if the non-past tense is used, then it will sound like the waiter simply forgot the order and is asking for the second time with a guess. That can be rude. By using the past tense, it expresses that the customer's ...


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In short, your waiter said what he said because it is the "in" thing to do for young workers (mostly part-time) at inexpensive restaurants, fast food places, convenience stores, etc. This speech style is called 「マニュアル[敬語]{けいご}」, 「コンビニ[言葉]{ことば}」、「ファミレス言葉」, etc. and it has been very common the last 20 years or so. (マニュアル = "manual", ファミレス = "family ...


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Here is how I and many other native speakers use the two words in real life. I am answering without looking at anything. 「静かさ」 describes the bare physical degree of how "not loud" a thing is. Quietness, while it may be desired, is not a prerequisite here. Examples: 「静かさ」 is used to talk about how quiet a car, airconditioner, street, person, etc. is. ...


3

I have found something that might be useful from poking around in the etymological information I have to hand. Shogakukan notes in their entry for 静{しず}か that the noun form is 静かさ. There is no separate entry for 静かさ。 When looking to see if there was an entry for 静けさ, I found an entry instead for 静けし, which lists a noun form of 静けさ. 静{しず}けし appears to be ...


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Please allow me to address practicality. Colloquially, we use ~の事 often. It makes a good padding in conversation and it sounds natural. I dunno what others think, but, in writing, I find using ~の事 frequently makes you sound a little inarticulate. As we can overuse the term, if you write like how you speak, you could be littering with the terms in your ...



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