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1

取り返しがつかない refers to something that cannot be undone. It's mostly used to caution against an action - 'hey, if you do this, you can't take it back'. After the fact, it's pretty much just a plain statement of fact with minimal emotional connotation. 仕方がない refers to something that cannot be avoided. It's mostly used to lament or complain that an action must be ...


-4

先に行ってて means "he/she" said he will go first. "て" means that someone said the phrase .


8

I would have no choice but to say that there is a difference. Little particles do have that kind of power and influence over much bigger words than themselves. You would sound like you are a little more satisfied with your job if you said 「[今]{いま}の[仕事]{しごと}は[悪]{わる}くないです。」 than when you said 「今の仕事は悪くはないです。」. This is a prime example of the contrastive は. ...


8

XXは悪くない。 sounds to me like XX is okay or maybe good. XXは悪くはない。 sounds to me like saying: XXは悪くない。が、良くもない。(XX is not bad. But it's not good, either.)


-1

There's 2 different usages of か here (but it's not のか on one side and か/のですか on the other one): か as a subsentence connector. For example: どの大学に入るかはまだ決めていません, where か serves to connect hasn't decided clause to the which university he goes to subsentence by expressing it as a question, a doubt or similar (expressed in English by how, why etc). In your 3rd ...


2

のか and のですか are two versions of the same thing - both are questions with の - but のですか is more formal due to the inclusion of です. I wouldn't say のか has the same meaning as のですか, but it does have the same meaning if you disregard formality - のですか is the formal version of のか. In your example sentences, the のかs are in embedded questions (eg English 'I don't know ...


0

As far as I know, this kind of の shows personal/emotional involvement more than a grammatical function. In the first sentences, they are wondering how to read or write kanjis in general... and whether they should participate or not to something requiring a reply. The の indicates that this question is preoccupying them. In the next sentence, a specific ...


0

If there are several uses for the 〜ようにする construct, then I could be way off... but here is one explanation from an N3 grammar study book* that I have been using: 〜ようにする Expresses the act of making an effort to do something habitually. Example 健康のために、野菜を食べるようにしています。 I try to eat more vegetables for the sake of my health. Edit: On the same ...


1

I agree with the comments from the other two answers. I am not sure how useful this will be but as I looked into guidance on acceptable sentence endings a little while ago (in particular when the zero copula, の and か can be used) you might be interested to see what I found for “question statements”. As I already had them I have kept のか? and だ in but by all ...


3

I'd say that the ones you've picked are pretty regular semantically. ~? and ですか?are simple yes/no questions used when you have no prior information one way or the other. You can also use them to confirm that you heard correctly. なの? and なんですか? tie the question in with the discourse or prior assumptions. You've heard or gotten some hint that e.g. he's a ...


2

For a confoirmation to 彼は医者になった, both 医者? or 医者なの? work. But the formar is more associated with nuance of "Huh? Perdon me?" while the latter has more to do with surprise. きれい? or 上手? are fine. For a reply to「彼氏は病院で働いてる」, it's 彼は医者[○?  ○なの?] though the latter has more sense of inference. As a normal question (e.g."Excuse me, do you have a boyfriend who is a ...


4

We have two different words here -- two different で's. Auxiliary verb vs. Particle. In the phrase 「[秋]{あき}の[風]{かぜ}は[静]{しず}かで」, the 「で」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (= "continuative form") of the affirmation auxiliary verb 「だ」. Thus, the phrase will surely be followed by another phrase in regular prose-style writing. As a title of a creative writing, however, ...



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