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2

最も有名でない usually means the least famous while 最も有名ではない usually means not the most famous. That said, you don't have to be too serious.


2

This is a case where translating literally to English might be helpful. For example, you could think of 「謝らなくてもいい」 as "You don't have to apologize," and 「謝ることはない」 as "There is nothing to apologize for." The implication of the first is that there may or may not have been something that went wrong, but it doesn't necessarily need an apology. The second is ...


0

Basically it's a matter of grammar rather than nuance. As you may know, 「は」 in 「ではない」 is (semantically almost bleached out but still functioning) topic marker in the theme-rheme structure of Japanese. In other words, it delimits theme and rheme parts of a clause. And one clause may only contain up to one theme and rheme respectively. Then, what happens if ...


3

冷やかし is basically negative, and saying "(私は)冷やかしです" to a shop staff is rude. In reverse, if a staff said "冷やかしですか" to you, he must be strongly irritated. Saying "冷やかしでお店に入った" to your friend can be acceptable depending on the situation, though. Some shops have signs like "冷やかし大歓迎" so that people can enter the shop freely.


-1

It's almost exactly the same as the difference between 教わる and 教える, only in this case English uses different words: "learn" and "teach". The other answers give the correct grammatical explanation, but I think it helps to see that this is not really a Japanese peculiarity, it's a curious fact about English that in very many cases the same verb is used for ...


2

I think what you have learned is absolutely correct: these are words with similar meanings, and you should not be confused. There are lots of words (in all languages) with very similar meanings, and often the only way to understand which is most appropriate in a particular case is from experience of hearing them used. So it's quite hopeless trying to learn ...


1

For 保つ the nuance I think is "to hold on to X, or to withhold the X". It is easy to see that if you fail in doing so, the situation will completely change. 正気を保つ (to mantain/keep one's sanity, possibly in the face of a situation which might make you literally insane) 平静心を保つ (to keep your calm) 平和を保つ refers to making effort to keep the peace. ...


2

The examples in my J-E dictionary only use 秘める to hide something "within". IE, something intangible. The spirit within... etc. They actually use it for something like treasure, but again, this is on a far grander scale, and aren't necessarily related to something physical. You'll also not hear of someone using it in the every day sense, as with 隠す, which ...


7

絶叫する can be used with anything; you are scared, sad, surprised, angry (possibly less common with angry), whereas 怒鳴る always means you are angry.


4

The ~方向に持って行く is metaphorizing something which can be taken in the direction of romance. In this case it's either "the two's relationship" or "the novel in general". この場合は「笑い話」ということなので「会話」を物にたとえて「持って行く」と表現しています http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1049626510 The あんまり effects the 持って行きたくない, ie. the author doesn't really want to ...


4

Searching the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese, I find the following results:  生きがい   606 results, 75% of total  生き甲斐   186 results, 23% of total  生甲斐    20 results, 2% of total As you can see, in this corpus the most common way to write it is 生きがい. In fact, this is the form recommended by the NHK漢字表記辞典 (the kanji 斐 isn't included on the ...


1

妥協 is used when both or either of two people/groups/countries give over opinions/ideas to seek out common ground with no conflict. 歩み寄り is used when both of two people/groups/countries try to reach happy middle ground. 折衷 means putting all the good points of different opinions/ideas together. 和解 means reconciliation. 譲歩 is used when the doer gives over ...


3

These words or phrase are so similar that even a native Japanese speaker could confuse their meanings. However, there are a few differences between these words: 妥協 "compromise" Usually, 妥協 is based on a unilateral view from a person or group and suggests some kind of dissatisfaction. 私はその契約には納得いかなかったが、予算から考えて妥協せざるを得なかった。 歩み寄り "compromise" This ...


9

証【あかし】: An object (mainly tangible) that symbolizes/proves the existence of something (often intangible, such as love, safety and friendship). Dictionaries just say 証【あかし】 is 証拠, but I feel this word is somewhat closer to "symbol" in modern Japanese. This is a bit literary expression, and is not frequently seen in scientific contexts. 証拠【しょうこ】: An object or ...


2

獣 is always read けもの or けだもの in modern Japanese. けもの Simply refers to any kind of beast or animal. けだもの It's only used for emotionally deprived, unscrupulous, monstrous individuals, like a murderer, rapist or barbarian. It always refers to the actual perpetrator, so for example, you wouldn't call Adolf Hitler a けだもの. Think of Chucky from Child's ...


5

意志{いし} It's just the will or desire of doing anything. やろうとする気持{きも}ち。 今週中{こんしゅうちゅう}にそのプロジェクトをやり遂げるという意志がある。 志{こころざし} Including the meaning of 意志{いし}, it's the determination or resolution to carry out a higher, long term goal or objective. It's not just the will, but the ambition, aspiration and resolve to do something. ...


3

The sentence looks old. In modern Japanese, it would be: だれも触れることのできない才媛 Here, “何人も” is translated into “だれも”, and “する [こと] 能わぬ” into “することができない”. This phrase is a derivative of the following sentence: その才媛にはだれも触れることができない。 Now, does this mean “No one can” or “Not enveryone can”? The answer is “No one can”. Why? “だれも” is usually used as an ...


2

It literally means "a talented woman whom no one is able to touch". 能わぬ would mean "not be able to". But, I would personally translate this to "a talented woman whom no one can get close to" or something similar.



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