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10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


9

Your sentence: 「[Name]さんは[仕事]{しごと}でよく[忙]{いそが}しいんですか?」 is strange because 「よく」 is most naturally used to modify verbs, and not adjectives like 「忙しい」.   Thus, 「よく忙しい」 sounds just very strange to the Japanese ears as our ears are not used to hearing such word combinations. In other words, if you literally translated the English sentence "~~ is often ...


8

I got curious and made some research. I have found an article here that explains exactly this difference. Apparently, under a legal point of view, there is no real distinction between the two as companies tend to treat one type or the other rather arbitrarily. There are cases where part-timers work alongside with full-time employees, and others where ...


8

ほうがいい Is used to say that out of a number of possibilities the stated one is preferable. お菓子を食べすぎないほうがいい It would be best if you didn't eat too many sweets. ことだ(です) Is used to say that something is important. (虫歯が嫌だったら)お菓子を食べすぎないことです。(If you don't like getting cavities then) not overdoing the sweets is a key. しないこと。 Is used to ...


6

The very literal meaning of しわ寄せ is "gathered wrinkles", although only a few people use this term in this literal sense (Shirring is sometimes called しわ寄せ(加工)). To understand しわ寄せ, suppose you are ironing a dress. It's difficult to iron out the wrinkles perfectly; you iron somewhere, and a new wrinkle appears somewhere else. That's the idea of しわ寄せ; you ...


6

老いる is a little bookish way to say "to age". The most common phrase now to say growing old is 年を取る. 老ける isn't really "grow old", but describing people become "older" than they really are, that is, they've got weary, out of blood, or lost youthfulness, often suggesting that they had a hard time. In its participle-like forms 老けている or 老けた it means "look old".


5

When I see 歓喜の声を上げる, I have something "explosive" in mind, like this: On the other hand, when I see 喜悦の声を上げる in non-religious contexts, what I would have in mind is the voice of sensual pleasure, induced by things like drugs or orgasm. According to BCCWJ, 喜悦 is rarer and much more literary than 歓喜. 歓喜 frequently appears in light novels and casual blog ...


5

[人前]{ひとまえ}ではやさしく[生]{い}きていた しわよせで こんなふうに[雑]{ざつ}に・・・[抱]{だ}きしめてた First of all, one needs to understand (and appreciate) that this usage of 「しわよせ」 would only colloquially be "correct". For that reason, a dictionary definition of the word would probably fail in this particular context. Next, one needs to notice the antonymy between the words 「やさしく」("...


4

行き先(いきさき) is a mundane word meaning "destination (e.g., of a bus, trip)". Some people say ゆきさき, which is a variation of this. 行く先(ゆくさき) sounds a bit literary. In lyrics, poetry and stiff novels, 行く先 is semantically identical to 行き先. If this word appears in casual speech, it would mainly refer to "future (e.g., of a child, project)" in modern Japanese. In ...


4

The two sentences are different. ケーキを全部食べてしまった does not carry the meaning of "unintentionally or accidentally". This sentence is perfectly fine even when the person who ate the cake was fully aware that he was doing a bad thing. The sentence just implies the result was not favorable to the speaker anyway. On the other hand, 何気なくケーキを食べた implies nothing ...


3

The question is not one of 'movement', but rather 'animacy' - i.e. how close to having human consciousness the entity in question is thought to be. Humans are of course close to human consciousness, as are things like gods or fictional sentient species, so you use いる. Pets and other animals can go either way, depending on how much humanity the speaker wants ...


3

There is some overlapping meaning. There are also some differences. I think you may be touching on the deeper subject of the differences between に and と. Comparing the definitions of に and と shows that they can both be used to refer to the result(結果) of something. に shows the result of becoming (dynamic) and と shows the result of being (stative). ...


2

This is a good question, I personally think. If you google it in Japanese, even Japanese are confused too and I also haven't paid any particular attention to when to use them. Granted, this site explains as follows. About にしても * A, if not B「たとえBではないにしてもA」:AとBの位置に同じ種類の語句を置き、A, if not B の形で使われる if は even if の意味を持ち、「たとえBではないにしてもA」(もしかしたらBかもしれない)という状況を表します。...


2

I think personally the original Japanese sentence itself sounds a bit strange...しわ寄せ, as the linked Weblio says, 他からの悪影響で被害を被るさま feeling or receiving the unwelcome or bad impact due to the action or the result of others' or other's conduct or behaviors etc etc. whereas, the Japanese in your quote 人前ではやさしく生きていた しわよせで こんなふうに雑に・・・抱きしめてた ...


2

As I'm not a lyricist, nor know the full context of the song, I don’t know the meaning of “こんなふうに雑に.” Did the singer live a rough life? Was he or she treated roughly? Or has he/ she grown into a rough character? And I don’t know what the singer hugged. But I surmise the line in question is singing something like this: I’ve tried to be amiable to others ...


2

老ける strongly refers to one's appearance, like, say, after not seeing your friend for a few years you notice that he has visibly aged in appearance (perhaps more than he ought to have). On the other hand, 老いる refers more to the decline in physical ability / mental acuity with age.


1

"老いる" means "get old." in terms of age as well as physical and mental conditions. 老いること isn't a desirable matter. But you cannnot evade it. It's a rule of nature. Sometimes you can get wiser as you progress in age. In that sense, "老いる," sui generis doesn't have so much negative tone as our Minister of Finance, Taro Aso thinks - He said recently in his ...


1

This is a good question, since I have never paid due attention to before, and when I googled it some Japanese too have same question with you. The questioner went to ( probably a shrine ) on New Years Day and there he or she bought written oracles ( probably 2 ) and one of the oracles says 歓喜あり The other says 喜悦あるべし The answerer is responding ...


1

学校 means a building or place in which people are educated. There are many kinds of 学校. 学校 which is set by Basic Act on Education are 幼稚園、小学校、中学校、義務教育学校、高等学校、中等教育学校、特別支援学校、大学(短期大学および大学院を含む),高等専門学校. Their name is set by its purpose and the studying number of years. It is said that they have formal kind. 大学 and 大学校 are different. 大学 means university and ...


1

It depends on who your friends are. I don't think avoiding mention of the name of person whom we are meeting is not a general trait nor habbit of Japanese. As Chocolate said, I don't have any problem in mentioning the name of the person I have an appointment with to you, if both of I and you know him or her well, unless it should involve any speciffic ...


1

It's not uncommon for the Japanese to use the following in the regular conversation. Mostly they habituated not discussing about their personal things in more detail with others 用事があるから早く帰ります。 I will leave early because I have things to do. 予定/約束があります。 I have appointment/meeting (It can be any type of meeting) 体調が悪い。Ill/Sick (Does not talk about what kind ...



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