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8

As a noun Only 怒り【いかり】 stands as a noun anger, rage, fury etc. (Accent in Tokyo: いかり{LHH}) As a verb gerund (連用形) It's basically a matter of distinction between おこる and いかる. Both mean "to get angry, mad or furious", but: おこる is more colloquial and tends to describe anger towards real experiences ex. おこりっぽい、おこりんぼ etc. いかる is more literary and tends to ...


7

欲求 is a fairly objective / scientific word which is seen in psychological / sociological articles. 欲望 is kind of earthly by far, often meaning a lust toward money, fame, domination, possessions, and sexual actions. While the above two are used mostly in writings, 欲 is by much a conversational word, and has a range of various usages. 欲念 is rare. I believe ...


5

天気 (1-3 days): You'll hear 天気 used the most, as in 天気予報 weather forecast or 天気はいいですか Is the weather good today? You should almost always translate 天気 as "weather" in English. 天候 (2-10 days): 天候 refers to the overall state of the atmosphere between a few days to about 10 days. Its use isn't that common, however, in casual conversation it shows up in the ...


5

言われば is not correct. You should use 言われれば (or 言われたら). is the second part trying to say "If told to look, I'll look"? Yes, I think you're right. 言われれば consists of 言わ(未然形 of 動詞「言う」) + れれ(仮定形 of 助動詞「れる」) + ば(接続助詞).


5

The 行ってきます is no problem. As for ただいま, even Japanese people hesitate whether use it or not when they're not returning to their own homes. You can find many questions about using ただいま at in-laws' house, and how to respond to neighbor's おかえり are asked in Japanese forums (as well as here!). I still don't know how to greet back my landlord when she says おかえり to ...


5

I am a native Japanese, and I discussed this today. To be honest, this was quite interesting for us. I see many good answers here. The concept of "inside or outside" in another answer strikes close to a good point. Sometimes, it is possible to use both「知る」and「分かる」. For example, "Do you know this Kanji?" can be translated to both「この漢字、知ってる?」and「この漢字、分かる?」 ...


4

The conditional -(r)eba has two forms: Following a consonant-stem verb, it takes the form of -eba: 行く   ik-u →  行けば   ik-eba 泳ぐ   oyog-u →  泳げば   oyog-eba 差す   sas-u →  差せば   sas-eba 放つ  hanat-u →  放てば  hanat-eba 死ぬ   sin-u →  死ねば   sin-eba 運ぶ  hakob-u →  運べば  hakob-eba 飲む   nom-u →  飲めば   nom-eba 走る  hasir-u →  走れば  hasir-eba 構う  ...


4

What bothers you is the ambiguity of ~た form which could indicate both past and perfect. And the worse thing is you have no way to distinguish them in form, in this case. What you did: すみませんでした その節はすみませんでした。 What you have done: すみませんでした (~ present perfect) or すみません (~ present) こんなことになってしまいすみませんでした。 こんなことになってしまいすみません。 Now or future: すみません ...


4

You're largely correct, both of them refer to situations in the past, however, すみません has has the tendency of being used for immediate apologies (stepping on someone's foot). すみませんでした is more along the lines of, "Sorry about the other day."


3

天気 This is the most common word for weather, and expresses a naive concept of the entire perceptive state of sky (and air) in some place at some moment. It includes sunshine, cloudage, precipitation, wind, humidity and temperature, but not likely air pressure. By at some moment I mean, this word is expected to state an overall impression at a certain ...


2

朝ご飯は何を食べましたか。 This is correct. You're literally saying, "As for breakfast, what did you eat?" 朝食に何を食べたのですか? Google is using the particle に to indicate at in a similar manner to that of 今週末に (this weekend), however, に is usually omitted for relative times. They're both grammatically correct. "At breakfast, what did you eat?"


1

ミユキちゃんが結婚したと知ってる? This sentence is grammatically correct but not natural. ミユキちゃんが結婚したって知ってる? This one is natural. In modern Japanese conversation, it does 促音便化 in this case. But, the old style is also still in use even in conversation. ミユキちゃんが結婚したと知らされた。 So, here is the problem. "知ってる?" is quite informal, but "したと" is quite formal. That ...


1

Yes, it's appropriate. Chalk that one up to Japanese hospitality. The only gotcha word as a visitor (for your 2nd time) is using 帰る when saying you returned to Japan. I don't know what the cut off is, but you have to have spent quite a bit of time there to properly use it.


1

There's definitely a nuance, but most people will probably use whichever without giving it a second thought. 謝らなくてもいいよ It's ok, you don't have to say sorry. The nuance is that there could be a reason to apologize, but there was no bad intention so you are forgiven / I forgive you. For example: Aさん is apologizing to Bさん for something she did, but ...



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