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10

Only やる is acceptable in some common phrases: やった!I did it! ×した! やられた!You got me! ×された! やれ、やれ!Go for it! ×しろ、しろ! やられたらやり返せ。Eye for an eye. ×されたらし返せ。 やってくる come along ×してくる やっていく get along, make a living ×していく やっちまえ!Get him! ×しちまえ! やる is used/preferred for: 何時までやってますか?(≒営業する open; on business) ×何時までしてますか? 演奏会でピアノをやる(≒演奏する perform) ...


8

Yes, you are missing something important in the second sentence 「よく道を聞いてもらいます。」. Your understanding of the first is good, judging from the TL. The second sentence, by the way, is 100% grammatical but its content/meaning is more than just weird. It is highly unlikely that a policeman would say it unless there was an incredibly super-shy policeman ...


7

Rather than emphasis, I think such inverted questions occur only in spoken language, because the asker wants to know 何ですか "What was that?" and just asks straight away. Noticing that he could be asking about any number of things, he specifies, 今の音は. Such inverted questions are so common that they're less a sign of surprise or "being startled" than properly ...


7

This is a good example of where direct or literal translation does not work well between Japanese and another language. We often use 「どう」 where English-speakers would use nothing but "what". 「どうしよう。」 or 「どうしたらいいの。」 vs. "What should I do?" 「どうしましたか。」 vs. "What happened?" If you used 「なに」 instead of 「どう」 in the phrases above, you would sound more ...


6

The first sentence 「ジュースなりコーラなり、お[好]{す}きなものをどうぞ。」 is perfectly natural. It is asking you to choose whatever you want to drink and "juice" and "cola" are only two examples of what is available. Point is you have other choices as well. The second sentence is different. By using 「か」, the speaker is giving the addressee two choices only --- "juice" and ...


6

This is no easy question and I do not claim to know all about it. Informally, 「[経験]{けいけん}」 and 「[体験]{たいけん}」 are often used interchangeably when referring to a single incident that is a new experience for that person. Regarding whether or not doing so is appropriate, I will leave the judgement to the experts here. All I know for certain is that native ...


6

There is no difference in meaning between 「[一旦]{いったん}~~」 and 「~~が[最後]{さいご}」. You can use either of the two or even both together to say: "Once someone does A, he will always (or never) do B." or "Once A happens, there certainly will come situation B." In other words, it expresses an automatic and/or uncontrollable result. I will use your ...


6

I think that 面白い is actually much closer to "funny" than most learners realise, because they think of 面白い as "interesting". It often means "funny", e.g. アキちゃんはちょうおもしろいよね Aki is really funny. Another way of saying "that's really funny", which hasn't been mentioned, is (ちょう)うける


6

Extensive use of hiragana by intent will make yourself look immature, childish, unserious, drowsy, cute, innocent, or sometimes less intelligent, depending on the context. A good but exaggerated example is found here. A very childish character in a game, who is always talking in hiragana. ...


5

It means "after doing 〜". Almost like 〜てから. 両親とよく相談した上で、留学することにした。 → After discussing it with my parents, I decided that I'll study abroad. 家を買う場合は、十分調べた上で、決めた方がいい。 → When you buy a house, you should choose (it) after doing sufficient research. よく考えた上で、返事をするつもりだ。 → I intend to reply after careful consideration. There is some other nuance I ...


4

It does indicate a more childish audience—or at least that you don't think they can read kanji. It also, interestingly, makes things much harder to read for those who know kanji—doubly so if you don't put spaces in between words or after particles. Hiragana can also be used in place of kanji at times to allow for the execution of Japanese puns in text as ...


4

You've basically answered your question - the words you've listed are your options. There's pretty much nothing closer to the English word 'funny' than those words; and if there was a more direct translation, it would be unusual enough of a word that it would sound too strange to use in everyday conversation. I'd say to default to 面白い - it would mean ...


3

Well, it actually would not be terribly common for a wife to call her husband お前 in the first place (at least in public), I think. The other way around seems perfectly believable to me though. Anyways, in trying to understand why your professor may have been upset by that, all I can guess is that she considers お前 to be so jarringly incorrect for whomever ...


3

The main thing to take into account here is the ~てもらう that's used in the second sentence. With this construction, the subject receives the benefit of an action. To illustrate: 母【はは】に晩【ばん】ご飯【はん】を作【つく】ってもらった。 (My mother made dinner for me.) 先生【せんせい】に文章【ぶんしょう】を読【よ】んでもらった。 (The teacher read the sentence for us.) So in this case, it's not simply that ...


3

I think the other answers address it pretty well but I just want to throw in something that's a little weird about [研究室]{けんきゅうしつ} gets used versus "lab". [研究所]{けんきゅうしょ} is the place of study on the level of university or more likely research center. I say research center is more likely than university, because Japanese universities are, in my experience, ...


3

研究所 means "research institute". I have never seen 研究屋 (and it's not to be found in the BCCWJ corpus). I think that 研究屋 is 研究 "research" with the suffix 屋, which could have a number of nuances, e.g. "someone scientifically-minded", "Mr. Research". For a better translation, you'd have to provide some context. In any case, 研究屋 is definitely not a way to refer ...


2

As for your question, both が and に are equally common for だれ{が・に}これが出来るか while が is more common for だれ{が・に}日本語が分からないか. Because できる or わかる were originally intransitive verbs that meant 'appear' or 'split' respectively, they take a structure below. 私にこれができること = that this appears to me → that I can do this 私に日本語がわかること= that Japanese splits (itself) to me → ...


2

The same as "also" in English. The word "も" implies the existence of another option. 「お前達の相手は私一人でいい。」 is natural. Simply, the speaker must be very confident about the fight against many opponents in front of him. 「お前達の相手は私一人でもいい。」 sounds weird, but it seems that the speaker implies another person stronger than him is standing by. カレーライスでいい。 = Curry and ...


2

At its core, the difference is that う is the 音読み, and thus is used in 漢語【かんご】 (words of Chinese origin). あめ and its related forms are 訓読み, and are used in combination with other readings of Japanese origin. Now to get into some specifics... Using あま あま is related to あめ, and is used when あめ appears at the front of a compound and a vowel shift is required. ...


2

お・ご~ある・ない is an honorific expression, but 心配ない clearly does not belongs to it. I think “little” verbs like ~ない, ~ある, etc. are often somehow used as adjective suffixes. So you can consider 心配ない as an adjective, the が between 心配 and ない is not strictly required. 心配 can actually act as a noun, which is different from the 連用形 of verbs. You may see phrases like ...


2

ぜひ can be used in situations where you want to encourage someone to do something. お腹がすいたら、ぜひフレッシュネスバーガーへ! もちろん can be used in situations where you're replying to an inquiry. お腹がすいた?もちろん、今朝から何も食べなかった There are other contexts and usages, but that's one big difference.


1

This is just a supplement to the above answer & comment. Your question was specific to ~た上で (so I won't expand unless you expand the question) but FYI there are other different uses of 〜上. I found the following sentence (from one the Soumatome-goi series) helpful to remember: 地図の上では近いのに   行ってみると  遠い上に、ひどい道だった   よく調べた上で行けばよかった。 On ...


1

First I think you have understood the sentence correctly. Your question is one that can be (and has been) answered very briefly if we assume you understand certain dynamics of Japanese grammar. Unfortunately explaining the dynamics takes a bit longer but this is my attempt: 1) When a sentence ends with a phrase such as 心配なく I would say there is an ...



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