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7

「め」 is a suffix of contempt when attached to a noun or another person's name. 「この[犬]{いぬ}め!」= "You stupid dog!" 「[許]{ゆる}せん、[田中]{たなか}め!」= "Will never forgive Tanaka the bastard!" Translation is an art. You could use whatever word you feel appropriate for the context that expresses contempt, scorn, disdain, etc. Note that it is a suffix of humility when ...


4

If you ask about "actual" difference, the fact is that the major part of their meanings are overlapping so you can't really find an example only one of them is acceptable and others are not. Administrations might define these words as they like. However, according to my personal sense, the basic ideas are: 地区 vs 地帯 vs 地域 They are suitable for indicating ...


3

It means kind of "tomorrow or the next day", accurately "tomorrow or another day if you can't afford tomorrow".


3

「オレは[痛]{いた}みを[訴]{うった}える[頭]{あたま}を[巡]{めぐ}らせ」 「巡らせ」 is not in the imperative form. Rather, it is the [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) of the causative verb 「巡らせる」. 「頭を巡らせる」 is a set phrase meaning "to ponder". "I pondered in my aching head, trying to recall the cause as to why this had to happen."


3

Whether you use intransitive or passive depends mostly on what you want to imply. Passive is used when there's clearly an active agent causing the action (even if the agent isn't explicitly stated). Intransitive doesn't carry that information. ドアが閉まる - The door closes. (彼に)ドアが閉められる - The door is closed (by him). The first example only means ...


3

Most of the time, when I see a verb before a -Ni, it'll be in the -te form. Maybe you could provide some example? IMO, this is 100% wrong. You first assumption is false and that is what probably confuses you. verb A (renhyoukei) + ni + verb B means to b to a. That is all you need to know. Thus, 起こしに来る means to come to wake up.


3

「[間違]{まちが}える」 and 「[誤]{あやま}る」 are interchangeable much of the time as far as meaning goes, but that does not mean we use the two equally often. Native speakers learn to actively use 「間違える」 years before they learn to use 「誤る」. So, even into their adult life, they use 「間違える」 much more often in informal conversation and writing. 「誤る」, therefore, sounds less ...


2

I usually think of it as... 間違える > To make a mistake 誤る > To make an error / to err You can also say things like... 間違いなどがあれば、 > If there are mistakes, 誤りがあれば、 > If there are errors / typos, A more polite email might use 誤る but it wouldn't be particularly out of place to use 間違い in either case (informal or polite).


2

大辞林 says 命運 そのこと(もの)の存続にかかわる重大な運命。「—が尽きる」「国家の—」 the keywords being 存続にかかわる重大な, that is 命運 is serious and may affect the continuance of the thing or person whose 命運 is being discussed. WWWJDICT gives "doom" as translation; I don't think it is a good translation, but thematically it fits very well, it's a kind of fate that may be the last fate the ...


2

I think '明日あたり' is more widely used but same meaning. 明日 and 明日あたり are different. 明日 == tomorrow 明日あたり == tomorrow but with some tolerance. It means a day after tomorrow is possible option. But not today. Because most people know today's own schedule. 25日あたり == In general, 24, 25 or 26 if today is not 24.


2

その程度 consists of the two words その and 程度, and can be used as such with no particular connotation. Furthermore, as noted by @broccoli forest, over time the combination その程度 has become a collocation with an additional nuance, namely implying a low or insufficient level or degree. In the latter case, it can be considered one "word" or expression, which is ...


1

Something that 光る is something that emits/reflects light. The sun. A star. A flashlight. An LED. 輝く is to shimmer/sparkle. The sun reflecting off a lake's waves does 輝く. A diamond reflecting light does this. As for 光り輝く, it's the same thing as 輝く. And as someone else here said, if you just want to compare words to get a nuanced meaning of the word, a ...


1

Suppose you say "it's not" or そうで…ありません そうではない is the most natural choice for simple "it's not", and if you put stress on は, it implies there's other possibility even if it's specifically not the case. そうでもない is (1) "not really" or (2) "it's not either". そうでない is not really natural for a sentence, it rather sounds like a clause.



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