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11

Here is how I and many other native speakers use the two words in real life. I am answering without looking at anything. 「静かさ」 describes the bare physical degree of how "not loud" a thing is. Quietness, while it may be desired, is not a prerequisite here. Examples: 「静かさ」 is used to talk about how quiet a car, airconditioner, street, person, etc. is. ...


8

In short, your waiter said what he said because it is the "in" thing to do for young workers (mostly part-time) at inexpensive restaurants, fast food places, convenience stores, etc. This speech style is called 「マニュアル[敬語]{けいご}」, 「コンビニ[言葉]{ことば}」、「ファミレス言葉」, etc. and it has been very common the last 20 years or so. (マニュアル = "manual", ファミレス = "family ...


8

As a customer, using either one is completely fine. Among us native speakers, it is like each person has a habit of using one over the other. Point is each eatery tends to use one word over the other among its staff members as well, meaning that even when you order by saying, for instance, 「[卵]{たまご}なしで = "with no eggs"」, your waiter/waitress might reply ...


4

There are a few verbs that do this. It's not just 思う but also 考える. I tried coming up with an English parallel but after a few goes decided that they don't work. The source difference as I see it is that the Japanese language has a stricter account of philosophy of mind that works from the idea that we don't have access to the thoughts and feelings of ...


4

If you are familiar with the general difference between on-readings (音読み) and kun-readings (訓読み), you already know the basic difference between 形【かたち】 (kun) and 形状【けいじょう】 (on). 形 is used in informal conversations/writings and most of formal conversations, while 形状 is preferred in formal written texts or scientific articles. Usually Japanese children learn ...


3

Yes, it can. I remember my teacher at school (here in Japan) sometimes using 頑張りましょう when talking about activities that he would not directly take part in. He was however peripherally involved, like being the one setting the test he was referring to with his 頑張りましょう。 I'd say that there needs to be at least a link between the person using this form and the ...


3

I have found something that might be useful from poking around in the etymological information I have to hand. Shogakukan notes in their entry for 静{しず}か that the noun form is 静かさ. There is no separate entry for 静かさ。 When looking to see if there was an entry for 静けさ, I found an entry instead for 静けし, which lists a noun form of 静けさ. 静{しず}けし appears to be ...


1

It depends on how it is used. If the customer had made all the orders, and the waiter is making a confirmation going through the orders, and if the non-past tense is used, then it will sound like the waiter simply forgot the order and is asking for the second time with a guess. That can be rude. By using the past tense, it expresses that the customer's ...


1

Please allow me to address practicality. Colloquially, we use ~の事 often. It makes a good padding in conversation and it sounds natural. I dunno what others think, but, in writing, I find using ~の事 frequently makes you sound a little inarticulate. As we can overuse the term, if you write like how you speak, you could be littering with the terms in your ...



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