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6

(Turning my own comment above into an answer. There will, however, be no references provided as OP requests. Everything I state here comes directly from my head as an average Japanese-speaker.) First off, I would like to make it clear that this is not a question of nuance. This is a question of what I might call the "practical and intentional ...


6

避難所 is a building with a roof (often a school) where people can stay (potentially for a few days) if their house is destroyed or somehow unreachable. 避難場所 is an open air space (often a park) where people must flee until they are sure that staying in their house is not dangerous (collapsing, fire). Reference: ...


3

Exactly. See how different they are. (Sorry for oversized image.) We imagine 手袋 as a kind of clothes for everyday life and work, and グローブ as a sports gear. Of course, more accurate transcription of glove is グラブ, which is preferred by baseball players. Some Japanese traditional sports have gloves that are never called グローブ. For example, in 剣道【けんどう】 they ...


3

「[声]{こえ}をそろえる」 in this context, means: "to say (basically) the same thing about something as others have previously said about it" or in short, "to express a similar opinion" In other situations such as multiple people singing or saying the same thing together , 「声をそろえる」 means: "to sing in unison" or "to speak in one voice" respectively. ...


2

This is no easy question without knowing the exact context or situation in which to use either of the two expressions. So, I will begin with the part of your question that I could answer with complete confidence. No, 「楽しみにしとく」 does not mean "I enjoy myself in advance about it." regardless of the context or situation. Both 「楽しみにしている」 and 「 楽しみにしておく」 are ...


1

It means: to speak in unison (with one voice). A synonym is 声を合わせる. EDIT: I think that what you said in your first comment seems to apply here. Hiroshi agrees with oneechan. Hiroshi made his opinion merge with oneechan's opinion when he says 「そうだぞ。。...」.


1

The word おく in しておく works to add a nuance "for a period of time." 楽しみにしています。 楽しみにしてます。 楽しみにしてる。 楽しみです。 楽しみ。 These five expressions all mean "I'm excited about it", "I can't wait" or something like that. These are expressing the present feeling. The following expressions fundamentally mean the same feeling as those above, but also ...


1

My dictionary say "しておく" means "ある目的のためにあらかじめある行為を行なうこと(an action for a purpose in advance). For example, 今日、明日のテストのために英語の勉強をしておく( I study English today for tomorrow exam.) I think 楽しみにしておく is a little more friendly and companionable saying than 楽しみにしている but they are almost same meaning.



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