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3

There is a way that ~もの can be applied to all verbs to "make them a noun", but it's not the way you're thinking of. If you have a verb (e.g. 走る【はしる】 "to run") and a noun (e.g. 人【ひと】 "person"), you can always take the dictionary form (辞書形【じしょけい】) of the verb and put it before the noun, to get a construction that means something like "[noun] that [verb]s" ...


6

「[新]{しん}メニュー」 is a very common phrase. We say 新ドラマ、新アニメ、新プラン、新ビール, etc. all the time and I do not think anyone finds it "improper". At least, I have never heard a native speaker complaining about it. What is extremely uncommon is that they inserted the 「ウ」 in there. Or is that a typo on your part? We do say 「[新]{あたら}しいメニュー」 as well, but the phrase lacks ...


3

Your example is indeed pronounced 新{しん}メニュー. Because 新メニュー is shorter, and thus more convenient. It's just a common compound noun. If you look up 新{しん} in your dictionary, it should mention that it can be (and very commonly is) used as a noun prefix, unsurprisingly meaning "new". Plenty, but a large share of them are long technical compound nouns such as ...


3

「し」 is the [連体形]{れんたいけい} (= attributive form) of the Clasical auxiliary verb 「き」, which expresses "past tense". As in your examples, it is sometimes used in the Modern context when the author wants it to sound "literary" and/or "dramatic". Today, it is used almost exclusively in fiction. 「[背負]{せお}いし[者]{もの}」=「背負った者」 「かつて[来]{き}たりし者」=「かつて来た者」 ...



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