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13

They both mean the same thing but the nuance is as follows: 〜さ (as in 悲しさ、楽しさ、痛さ) indicates a degree or an amount of 〜 〜み (as in 悲しみ、楽しみ、痛み)indicates a state of being I find the following contrasting examples as definitive: A:「痛さはどれくらいですか?」 = implies amount B:「痛み*の程*はどれくらいですか?」 = we add 程(ほど) to indicate an amount However, to make things easier ...


12

Here is how I and many other native speakers use the two words in real life. I am answering without looking at anything. 「静かさ」 describes the bare physical degree of how "not loud" a thing is. Quietness, while it may be desired, is not a prerequisite here. Examples: 「静かさ」 is used to talk about how quiet a car, airconditioner, street, person, etc. is. ...


10

〜さ seems to describe a "measurable" amount, while 〜み seems to describe a general concept of the adjective. 悲しみ - the general concept of sadness 映画の悲しさ - the (amount of) sadness of that movie (possibly compared to other movies). That's how I tend to compare them. Also note that many of these types of adjective have corresponding verbs, such as ...


6

Short answer: nominalization. In this case, it's not really a quirk of the Japanese language, at least you're doing pretty much the same in English as well. In English, we don't say *My hobby is play the guitar. *As for my hobby, play the guitar. The pattern A is B needs two things (either a noun, or mentioning a word or phrase, as in swim is ...


6

The sentence-final copula である ("be") is almost always omitted because it's obvious in definitions, leaving the sentences looking like ending with nouns. Both もの and こと are frequently used nominalizers translating "what do ~" and "doing ~" respectively. すなわち、1. (...) 2. (...) となるもの。 i.e. what satisfies 1. (...) and 2. (...). f:S→T が全射であるとは、f(S)=T ...


6

I believe that the の here is the same の as the の which is explained in this thread: What is the difference between the nominalizers こと and の? Basically the の here is a noun which means "thing". It is similar to こと (noun) which also means "thing". The difference between の and こと is that の is used when the "thing" is related to the speaker. This is furthur ...


5

Flaw's answer is of course correct, but here's another way to look at it. Start with a simple sentence like this: 犬{いぬ}が好{す}きだ。 "I like dogs." Since the predicate is a na-adjective, 好きだ, the object (犬) needs to be marked by が. (Your second sentence is ungrammatical for this reason, btw.) Then, if you want to say something like "I like running.", ...


5

The nominalisation occurs with just の. を and が are case markers and the choice between them depends on the other part of the sentence; whether a verb that assigns a を argument is used, or a verbal nominal adjective (such as 好き that takes が for object marking1), or a stative clause. Verb: 宿題をするのを忘れた Verbal Nominal Adjective: 水を飲むのが好きです Stative verb: ...


4

「[僕]{ぼく}の[人生]{じんせい}が[変]{か}わったのや、[明]{あか}るい[人]{ひと}になったのは、[全部彼]{ぜんぶかれ}のおかげなんだ!」 is grammatical and even sounds fairly natural. The only part that does not quite sound natural is 「明るい人」. We would rarely use 「人」 that way to refer to oneself, but again, it is still all grammatical. You could say 「明るくなった」. Am I using the right particles? Yes, you ...


4

The thing is that in this sentence, what is uninteresting is not the 物 but the fact that you eat the same thing everyday. Thus, you can "nominalize" the verb into 食べるの. After that, it's simply a matter of 「は」indicating the subject. You can thus parenthesize the phrase as : 「毎日同じ物を食べるの」は面白くない Note that this is similar, albeit with a different nuance to ...


3

tori wo tsukamaeru "I catch birds." "I will catch the bird." This is a full sentence, as you can see in the English meanings provided. tori wo tsukamaeru koto "catching birds" When you add koto on the end, it becomes a noun. Since it is a noun, you can use as part of a larger sentence: tori wo tsukamaeru koto ha kantan ja nai ...


3

I have found something that might be useful from poking around in the etymological information I have to hand. Shogakukan notes in their entry for 静{しず}か that the noun form is 静かさ. There is no separate entry for 静かさ。 When looking to see if there was an entry for 静けさ, I found an entry instead for 静けし, which lists a noun form of 静けさ. 静{しず}けし appears to be ...


3

Interesting question! The cases I can think of are ~より, ~には, ~にしても, ~にあたって バスで行くより、歩いて行くほうが早い It's faster to walk than to take the bus 日本に行くには、ビザが必要だ You need a visa to go to Japan 正しいにしても、やはり心配だ Even if it's true, I'm still concerned 参加するにあたって欠かせない This is necessary for participating There are probably others. As to why ...


3

Strictly speaking these two sentences have completely different meaning: 住んでいるのが好き。 - This means that you like the fact someone is living (somewhere). This could be you too, but that's not very clear way to tell it. Let's drop all the wrong usages of this phrase. 住むのが好き 。 - This means you like to live (somewhere).


3

This is not a 'productive' grammar. There are certain cases (e.g. 近い・近くの、多い・多くの) where there are both noun and i-adjective forms, but you don't generally see "高くの". Where the noun form exists it will generally have a dictionary entry as well. And of course, there are only a few basic colours which even have the i-adjective form. For the colours, I'm ...


2

As far as I know, they are generally identical in meaning and function. However, adding という seems to add emphasis to the meaning of the preceding phrase. I do not believe there is any general rule separating the usage of the two. (As long as you're using の and こと properly, of course.) It's hard to use Google to find sources to back this up (besides Yahoo ...


2

This is a common pattern that means "even if I wanted to V, I cannot V" or "no matter what, I cannot V". As such, in your sentence, it means " I could not get mad even if I wanted to.". As for the grammar, this is a conjunctive particle (接続助詞). Rather than attaching to the "dictionary form" (終止形), though, it attaches to the attributive (連体形). That is why ...


2

Meh, I just asked my wife (native Japanese) for her opinion on this. I gave her four sentences and asked her to rank them by "naturalness". She says none of them are "wrong", but that the ~ている forms are much more natural sounding to her. I've marked their order of naturalness: (3)ここに住むのが好きです。 (1)ここに住んでいるのが好きです。 (4)ここに暮らすのが好きです。 (2)ここに暮らしているのが好きです。 I ...


2

The sentence in question basically says that the soul is like liquid, and must be always inside some kind of container. A magician can't drain soul from someone and keep it on its own. You seem to have failed to translate the verb 留まる (=stay, reside) at the last. The basic structure of the sentence is "魂はあくまで~に留まる" (The soul absolutely stays in ~). And the ...


2

Both are the same meaning 殺さずに生け捕るってのが面倒でしたがね 殺さずに生け捕るのが面倒でしたがね the って is a abbreviation of という which is emphasizing 殺さずに生け捕る.


1

「[瞬]{まばた}く」 is a fairly "big" word and it would sound too heavy or literary to use in a children's song. The more common and intuitive word choice for native speakers would be 「瞬き(を)する」 not only for children but also for adults as well. 「まばたきしては みんなをみてる」 is in the structure: 「A(を)してはB(を)する」= "to do A and B alternately" = "(The stars) keep ...


1

I raised a similar question about the tense of verbs modifying nouns, which I think also applies here - the only difference is that the nominaliser の is being modified instead of a regular noun. Other users can give their assessment of the answer which I got from a teacher of Japanese. Short answer: The plain and "past"/"perfect" stative verbs are more ...


1

Your sentence has the word 「容易」 which has both -な形容詞「容易な(yooi-na)」 and the -い version 「容易い(tayasu-i)」. 「容易さ」 in your sentence can be read either "yooi-sa" or "tayasu-sa". The latter is generally used and the former is rather unusual. The problem is, now all the difference could be between 容易い(tayasu-i) and 容易な(yooi-na), not -さsuffix and -性suffix. Still, I ...


1

the 悲しみ version could be re-written as 悲しく感じ, though not 100% accurate is a way to easily remember what the meaning is. This would be the feeling of sadness. さ i like to liken to 差, which means difference or level. So 悲しさ would be level of sadness


1

From what I've gathered and figured out. This is what is happening: Orochimaru asks Tsunade to heal his arms although she had no intentions of helping him. Tsunade is reconsidering the matter after he offers to resurrect her dead brother and lover. He is asking for her response to that matter. Naruto is replying on behalf of Tsunade saying "そんなの答えはNOだってばよ" ...



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