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Chacha was lady Yodo's childhood name, eldest daughter of Oichi, Oda Nobunaga's sister. Trying to find the meaning myself.. That first kanji looks like it's from Ocha, which is tea... But that's only the reach of my amateur "otaku Japanese"... I can read hiragana and katakana, but I only know a few dozen kanji, probably less than 100, which is not a lot. >_&...


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For Western names, practically speaking, Katatana is best. If you're a citizen of a country where Kanji is used on official documents like your passport, say... China or Korea, then it is common to use either Kanji or Katakana in Japan. For citizens of Western countries, your Kanji name will never be your "official" name (unless you become a citizen of ...


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First of all, you are doing everything correctly by typing akane in hiragana mode, which should give you あかね, and trying to convert it to kanji. In the list of suggestions when trying to convert あかね, you should get 茜 as a suggestion (my IME has it). If this doesn't work for you, you should be able to get it by its other reading せん. If neither あかね nor ...


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Well according to here there are 2 households with the last name 鮫{さめ} in Japan. Perhaps you met one of them? :) However, if you change it to 鮫島{さめじま/さめしま} you can find many more households, like this women's soccer player: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aya_Sameshima


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A tricky issue with many implications! As a single character, it should just be read doku. But it is regarded as the abbreviation of 独逸語 doitsugo or shorter 独語 dokugo which Japanese and also Koreans (under Japanese rule) have chosen to refer to the German language in the 19th century. Most Japanese natives would read it doitsugo or dokugo. As the single ...


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If I read aloud this sentence, I omit the parenthesis part or convert it to more understandable expression like 鉄血宰相、ドイツ語ではEiserner Kanzler、の異名を取る The most common use of those single-kanji country names is the pairs/combinations of countries such as [日米]{にちべい}, [米中]{べいちゅう}, [日韓]{にっかん}, [日中韓]{にっちゅうかん}, and some language names such as [英語]{えいご}, [仏語]{ふつご}...


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I'd agree with the firstname-san in direct-greeting and 3rd-party mentions , although once conversation is going i'd reckon any usual kochira-sochira patterns and (not-even-necessarily) relational titles (ojisan/obasan, uncle/auntie etc, possibly dropping the o and even perhaps the san later if the folk are friendly and the meeting/circumstances casual) for ...


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When speaking Latin .... do as the Romans do, is one method, and I use it. In Japan I always use (surname)(given-name) order when writing in Katakana, or when pronouncing my name in Katakana while speaking Japanese. If talking to a person in English, then I will use English pronunciation and (given-name)(surname) order. If, in Japanese, I am asked to ...


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Typically, you state it in the order that is normal for your language. Koreans and Chinese say their family name first, Americans say it last. Japanese people are well aware of that language difference, so they expect us to keep our names in the original order. They also use the original order when saying foreign names themselves. The only times I put my ...



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