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25

It's a double hyphen, not an equals sign. One of it's use is when transliterating names that have a hyphen in them. This is to avoid confusion with the extended sound symbol (ー) in Japanese. For example: クロード・レヴィ=ストロース (Claude Lévi-Strauss) Another time when the double hyphen is used is when in the original language, there is a stop in the sound. Your ...


23

According to this page, the following types of characters are allowed in names: 名づけ(命名)に使える文字と記号 ひらがな(ゐ・ゑも含む) カタカナ(ヰ・ヱも含む) 「ー」(音をのばすときに使う。例:リリー、サリー) 「ゝ」(一つ前の字の繰り返しのとき使う。例:なゝえ) 「ゞ」(一つ前の字に濁音を付けて繰り返しのとき使う。例:みすゞ) 「々」((一つ前の漢字の繰り返しのとき使う。例:奈々) So that's hiragana, katakana, extension, and repetition marks. Valid examples are given for each in the ...


17

Why is the Japanese government considering adding kanji such as “cancer” to the jinmeiyō kanji? I do not think that the government is trying to add these kanji to the set of jinmeiyō kanji. I think that some people are confused by the unclear description in Wikipedia. At least I was confused at first. So probably it is useful to clarify it. Article ...


15

It depends on what you're writing, I would think. If you're writing a note to yourself, like "Call Suzuki-san later", of course you could guess or just write it with kana. If you're writing something to the person themselves, I tend to write it in katakana. I don't know why, but this seems to be politer, in a sort of neutral way. But this is just my ...


14

"-さん" is an honorific suffix added to give respect. It can be used either with males and females, and also with given names and family names, not to your own name, though. It can be even used attached to the name of the occupation and titles. It's ok to use it with people that you are familiar with, but it's kind of mandatory when you are talking to ...


14

I believe the rule you are looking for is called 人名字取り. 5字取り is the most commonly used for the closing credits in movies. What this means, is everything is aligned based on 5 characters. Here is an image for reference (link). I found this other reference which has a few more patterns (posted below). If I'm understanding the question correctly, 5字取り or ...


12

Searching on a name dictionary you'll get a long long list (93) of "midori" as a girl's given name. This excludes "midori" being used as a family name or a place name. "Midori" is not limited to the kanji for green though. It can be made up of other kanji having 名乗り (nanori - name reading) of "mi", "do", "ri", "mido", "dori" compounded to form "midori". ...


11

Generally speaking these are read using the 音読み, and most frequently occur in pairs (e.g. 日米【にちべい】, 日独【にちどく】). I actually did some trolling through EDICT and a couple other sources to create a master list of these, and came up with the following list: 豪 ごう Australia 爾 る Argentina 墺 おう Austria 白 ぱく Belgium 戊 ぼ Bolivia 伯 ぱく Brazil 勃 ぼつ ...


10

It's used quite normally. My business emails, spam mail, post from the bank or government are all normally addressed to David 様, or whatever exact name they happen to know me by. The same goes for more informal communication using 〜さん or other less honorable honorifics. A certain client of mine is addressing me as DAVID SAN in emails. Non-roman, non-Japanese ...


10

Also, while さん is right for almost all cases, [先]{せん}[生]{せい} should be used for: Doctors, lawyers, politicians, professors, of course teachers, or anyone else that's (a) a direct mentor or (b) has some serious professional qualifications (ala a professor).


9

I'm sorry to inform you that there are many, many different ways to write the Japanese name Midori, as you can see from this search of a name dictionary. If you need to know how to write a specific woman's name, you probably need to ask her. As for your other question about みどりの, the の is a word that comes between a word and the word it's describing. ...


9

Does anyone know what might be the correct kana for this name? It is your name, so you are entitled to choose the correct kana. However, there is historical precedent for ジョアン. There is a famous Portuguese missionary João Rodrigues who came to Japan in the late 16th century. He left several important books including "Arte da Lingoa de Iapam" (日本大文典) ...


8

Yes, young children and young women often refer to themselves by their first name. There is the notion that it is cute and women will use it when talking to close family members, etc. If an adult male would use it, it would sound very effeminate. Also, when an adult women uses it, some people consider that she is trying to look cute on purpose and be turned ...


8

Wikipedia says that Osaka used to be spelt 大坂, and is now spelt 大阪. It is more complicated than that: Initially it was 難波 (Naniwa). In 1496, it was 小坂 ("Little Hill", Osaka AND Ozaka). 尾坂 and other spellings also exist. This is thought to focus more on the area around Ishiyama Honganji. In 1583, Toyotomi Hideyoshi built 大坂城, and throughout the Edo ...


8

The つ character you're talking about is commonly referred to as "little つ" and looks like っ. This characters is not actually pronounced, but rather it means to take a small pause. In the case of にっぽん, instead of pronouncing it as "nitsupon", you would be pronouncing it like "ni [small pause] pon" which is romanised as "nippon" which has a natural pause ...


7

If you talk to a teacher, it is always appropriate to use -先生. If you are a student and talk to a teacher, you should always use -先生, even outside the school. If you are a teacher and talk to a fellow teacher, depending on the relation (you are a boss or the other teacher is a boss, you are younger or older etc.), it may be also acceptable to address the ...


7

In general, Japanese people will address people by their last name if they are anything but good friends. So that would be the tendency would be Doeさん. However when it comes to western people 2 things come into play. 1) Your name might be difficult to say. 2) They might know our custom is to use first names more often. When I was in Japan and dealing ...


7

The general guideline is to use さん whenever you're unsure. As a learner, you cannot really go wrong with it.


7

A given name can be in theory virtually anything --- a decade ago or so, there was a family who gave his son the name 悪魔 (devil) and that became a news. When you register a newborn to the local government, apparently they cannot really refuse a name just because it's stupid --- so despite various people recommending against it, the child did get his name in ...


7

I think that it is rare to use the words such as A子 and B子 as an abbreviation. They are placeholder names for females, and they do not usually mean that the names actually end with 子. Just like suffix 子, suffix 男 (such as A男) is often used to make placeholder names for males. (Here is a random example which uses A男 and B子.) Some people use letters with 子 ...


7

By any modern conventions ハリエット would be the proper way to write it. Something like ハリエタ would be wrong because, first, words ending with consonants like t in this case frequently have a っ (small tsu) to give it that kind of hardness, and second, because words that end in t generally use ト rather than タ at the end. Using タ makes it sound more like it's from ...


7

There are several generic word for children, and we can call toddlers like: ぼく (Only for boys, popular) わたし (Not only but especially for girls) Example: ぼくはどこからきたの? (Where did you come from?) ぼく/わたしのおなまえは? (What's your name?) Additionally, for schoolchildren (older than toddlers), we can call them [君]{きみ}. Usage of 君 is really wide. With 君, you ...


7

I think you are thinking of some distinctive names used by nobles and bishops. Some (many?) of them have distinctive suffix like 〜[小路]{こうじ}, 〜[坊]{(の)ぼう}, 〜[寺]{じ}, and so on, and because of these suffixes, the names tend to get longer for them. Note that there's a plenty of two-character surnames, such as [徳川]{とくがわ}, [藤原]{ふじわら}, [近衛]{このえ}, etc. that are used ...


7

As a general rule, yes loan words are pronounced just as they are written. I say general rule because I have noticed bilingual announcers on the radio who mix English and Japanese do sometimes insert the original pronunciation into their Japanese sentences. As far as your name is concerned, yes it would be normal to say it as you write it in katakana: ...


7

There are at least general tendencies, if not necessarily hard-and-fast rules regarding the matter. Just off the top of my head --- Japanese vowel assigned vs. Ending consonant of English name ウ: b, f, g, sh, k, l, m, p, s, v, z (ボブ、ジェフ、グレッグ、ジョッシュ、リック、カール、トム、etc.) オ: d, t (トッド、マット, etc.) イ: ch (リッチ、ミッチ) When an English name ends with "r", our usual ...


7

Since "youthful immortal" is not a common reading for the name "Midori," if you have the opportunity to ask your parents their intended kanji, that would be the easiest route. The main kanji for Midori is 緑 (meaning greenery, or the color green). There are a few obsolete kanji variations on it that hold the same meaning. Another possible combination that ...


6

This site about wedding manners specifically says it is rude to mistake the characters of people's names. 名前を書く際は、旧字体、人名外字などを間違えて失礼とならないように何度もチェックしてください。 Also, if you are willing to accept this as evidence: 人名外字1500V4 This is a program and collection of fonts specifically for rare/old kanji names. It costs ¥50000. I don't think they would be able to ...


6

On Wikipedia and elsewhere, Japan is written like so: Nippon ( にっぽん ). What is that tsu doing in there? The chiisai-tsu (small tsu) should be covered by any basic hiragana book, a good alternative is wikipedia's hiragana article. From the writing section: A small tsu っ, called a sokuon, indicates that the following consonant is geminated ...



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