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Yi (and other characters) existed in Japanese a long time ago and I found an old katakana sheet that has the missing characters. This image is from 1873: More on this at this Japanese wikipedia page for: ヤ行イ. Also, note that this page has the respective hiragana characters too. In reality, most native Japanese will not be able to read the "classical yi" ...


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If you look at the Hiragana chart below, you notice that there are no corresponding letters for "yi" and "ye". Those letters do not exist in Japanese (not that we can't pronounce it). (From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hiragana) When we need to write foreign words containing "yi" and "ye", we use イ, and イエ (or sometimes イェ) respectively. A good example ...


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イン is pretty much the standard way to transliterate Chinese "ying" to kana. Here are some examples: 陶晶瑩 - Taiwanese celebrity Pinyin: Táo Jīngyíng Kana: タオ・チンイン 劉若英 - Taiwanese celebrity Pinyin: Liú RuòYīng Kana: リウ・ルオイン 馬英九 - President of Taiwan Pinyin: Mǎ Yīngjiǔ Kana: either ばえいきゅう (on'yomi of each kanji) or マー・インチウ (direct transcription of what ...


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I agree that イン is probably the best fit for the limitations of Japanese. Of course, being Chinese, your friend already has a kanji for his/her name, so you could always just use that and write イン as furigana for it. Alternatively -- and I don't know how much this would happen in real life -- you could just use a Japanese pronunciation for the name's ...



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