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3

I think your question might reflect some confusion about the Japanese language. There are multiple words pronounced カンジ in the Japanese language. If you type on your computer, you should see a drop-down with many of them (in fact not all possible words with that pronunciation in Japanese). For the most part, each kanji way of writing カンジ pronunciation is a ...


5

Yes, 娘が心配する means "(my) daughter is worried (about someone else)," whereas 娘が心配だ means "(I am) worried about (my) daughter". (EDIT: The latter expression using the (na-)adjective is in the same vein as 猫が好きだ and 猫が欲しい) So 娘が心配しちゃいますので in this dialog means "(If I go home late) My daughter will be worried about me, so... (I can't go with you)."


0

Chacha was lady Yodo's childhood name, eldest daughter of Oichi, Oda Nobunaga's sister. Trying to find the meaning myself.. That first kanji looks like it's from Ocha, which is tea... But that's only the reach of my amateur "otaku Japanese"... I can read hiragana and katakana, but I only know a few dozen kanji, probably less than 100, which is not a lot. >_&...


2

I would say, 美人であったとしても魅力的だとは限らない。[醜]{みにく}いならなおさらである。 I don't think the word 「不美人」 is commonly used. For 'Ugly', '[醜]{みにく}い' or 'ブス' in an informal context would be more natural. My Japanese expression above sounds to conclude that 'An ugly person is not attractive.' If the conclusion you want to deliver is 'Being pretty is not enough to make ...


3

There is no difference in meaning between 白い and しろい. Both are an adjective that can be used attributively and predicatively as in: 白い花 White flower 肌が白い Skin is white. You can read the Wikipedia article on Japanese writing system to understand which one to use in writing. Basically, kana is used when there is no corresponding kanji. 白 and ...


5

The ことか is used in an exclamatory sentence (感嘆文) , usually preceded by an interrogative word such as どんなに, どれほど, なんと, 何度 etc. Examples: どんなにうれしいことか! (≂ どんなにうれしいだろう!) How happy I would be! なんと美しいことか! (≂ なんと美しいのだろう! / なんて美しいんだろう!) How beautiful it is! 何度失敗したことか! (≂ 何度失敗しただろう!) (I have no idea) How many times I have failed! (「~~ことか!」 ...


0

なんということか! What the hell (is this) ! ずっと一緒だった仲間が別れなければならないのは、なんと残念なことか。 Having to say farewell to friends that were always with you is so sad. コンピューターは、なんと便利なことか。Computer is so convenient thing. As I know. ことか is a 2kyuu grammar. It is used to express your feeling about....


4

迷いを断ち切るかのように as a whole roughly means determinedly or decidedly, and it naturally modifies 断る in the next sentence. 迷いを断ち切る (lit. "to cut off one's doubt/hesitation") is a common metaphoric phrase which can be used without explicit ように. But we also often see it used with ように to explicitly indicate it's a metaphor. Maybe you can interpret this part literally ...


3

[彷徨]{さまよ}[へ]{え}: the 命令形 (imperative form) of さまよふ, which is the archaic version of さまよう [狂]{くる}[へ]{え}: the 命令形 of くるふ, the archaic version of 狂う る: the 連体形 (attributive form) of り, which is an archaic auxiliary verb similar in purpose to た/だ (perfective) or ている/でいる in modern Japanese. It takes the "imperative" form for whatever reason. So さまよえるオランダ人 is ...


1

Seems like it's modifying the sentence before not after. 「いや、そこまでは大丈夫」迷いを断ち切るかのように。 "No, that is enough", as if to remove any doubt.


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It comes from: つく[つく·付く], which primarily means to stick onto, to attach to, although it has several other meanings. In the situation you mentioned, it can be used as an English equivalent of "Follow (them/him/her/it)!" as the act of following is in fact, 'sticking on' to someone who is running or walking away. Just on a side note, Korean shares a lot of ...


4

person + も + 好き (with a target unsaid) is a euphemistic and idiomatic phrase meaning "[person] is a lecher". Basically it means "Oh, you (=蓮) also love ****", where **** is a certain type of activity, not a person, which is unsaid because saying it would be explicit. This idiom is particularly well-known as a part of 加藤茶's signature gag, ちょっとだけよ. Sometimes ...


2

I think might be hearing 「助かります」, which would be a way to say "thanks" when something you did was helpful.


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穏やかでない "not moderate" is an euphemistic idiom that describes something (usually about an event or a remark) is disturbing, ominous, abnormal, or alarming. In this case, though I don't know much about the context, it doesn't seem likely to mean "(the character, behavior of) someone isn't calm". Maybe what the speaker wants to tell is that the protagonist ...


0

You can definitely use 穏やか to describe people/personalities. (A quick search of 穏やかな人 on Google shows lots of hits. If you look at the 2nd definition of 穏やか here it says, which fits the translation pretty well. 2 気持ちが落ち着いていて物静かなさま。「―な人柄」「―に話し合う」「心中―でない」


2

かこっかな is a more casual way of かこうかな(書こうかな), and 〜うかな means "I'm wondering if I should 〜." So the phrase means "I'm wondering if I should write something". I don't know the whole sentence but かこっかな means this.


3

Did you notice the same guy said 噛みまくった in the next frame? Here 噛む is a slangy expression meaning "to falter" (see the fifth definition in jisho.org). The original sentence is: だいたいこんな感じじゃないですか.


5

こやつ is usually written in hiragana. But in kanji, it's 此奴, not 子奴 nor 小奴. You can find this word in jisho.org, デジタル大辞泉, Wiktionary, and any other decent dictionary. こやつ is a dated word used in place of こいつ. It often has a derogatory or accusatory nuance. Today, we mainly see こやつ in samurai dramas, historical novels and such. If you heard this used referring ...


2

I think that is こやつら (koyatsura), which I would translate as something like "These f****** bastards". 奴 is a derogatory way to say "he/she". Something like "This man". Putting the 小 before 奴 makes it worse, and shows more anger and disrespect for the subject. ら is just to make it plural.


6

Sometimes ~んでしまう means some of actions that you do without too much thinking about the responsibility or afterwards. Such as: 飲んでしまう やってしまう いってしまう, etc. This may be quite similar to "unintentional behavior", but it is also slightly different.


5

This sentence can translate to: いや……そういうことは全くもってないんだけど…… No... I don't mean it, but... Regarding the grammatical function, the けど in question is basically the same as けど described in this question: けど at the end of the sentence? Without けど, the sentence would become 「そういうことは全くもってないよ」, which is almost equal to accepting the girl's proposal in this ...


0

You can think of the usage of んだけど here as something like, "but it's just that..." 「いや……そういうことは全く思っていないんだけど……」 "No... That's not how I feel at all, it's just that..." (Well, you know... that thing I don't want to talk about directly with you)


2

In this case rather than expressing that the action is unintentional and perhaps unsatisfactory, in this case it means something like: "The exam is over! Today, let's drink!" (Normally I would refrain from drinking today, but since today is the day that we completed the test it's OK to let myself have a little fun and not worry about the result so ...


4

There are many common expressions to describe unhealthy skin using colors (eg, 青白い, 赤黒い, 土気色の), but 青黄色い is not something in common use in modern Japanese. 青い is commonly associated with pale and anemic skins, but 黄色い皮膚 is usually associated with jaundice (due to some liver disease). And according to Wikipedia, this guy (行男) had intestinal tuberculosis, ...


3

Yes it's やり (masu-stem of やる) + まくり (masu-stem of まくる). やる: See the eleventh definition of やる on jisho.org. masu-stem + まくる: "to do a lot of..." It's the second definition of まくる on jisho.org. まくり is in the masu-stem form so that it works as a noun. See this.


6

The statements in your picture have nothing to do with divorcing. 結婚する人: people who get married 結婚している人: married people 結婚した人: people who got married (≠ people who finished their marriage) 結婚していた人: people who were once married (people who have gotten divorced) 結婚した人 is interchangeable with 結婚している人 in most cases. 結婚している人 focuses more on the current state (...


2

The website appears to be an 当て字 generator. You input kana and it outputs 当て字 based on the above-listed arbitrary styles. They aren't real types of 当て字. As an aside, I'm not sure exactly what the criteria is for the first two (at a glance I'd say it could be kanji with bad connotations vs good/imperial connotations), but the latter two just create 当て字 using ...


0

I'm a newcomer just like you and I might make mistakes, so please wait for outside opinions before deciding whether you can trust my answer. 成績評価の甘い授業 Here 成績評価の甘い is a characteristic of 授業. 甘い is used in the sense of "generous". So all together it means: Teaching/lessons with generous grading. 成績の安売り Here 安売り is used in a figurative ...


2

Distinctly Visible Eye Later in the article they say 目がくっきりしていて, "(the hurricane's) eye is distinctly visible." If you look up くっきり at eg jisho.org,you will see entries like clear, sharp, distinct relating to vision, especially contrast/clarity. In other words, the title and article focus on how much the eye stands out relative to the hurricane, and what ...


2

We say the center of the typhoon as 台風の目(eye of typhoon) because it looks like eye. The clearer the eye show the stronger the stream is. How about "the eye of typhoon shows clearly"?


4

7th statement Yes, the 7th statement ("n percent increase from m percent") is ambiguous (between n+m percent and m*(100+n)/100 percent), and I believe a careful writer should never make a sentence like this. The literal interpretation is the latter, but in reality, people who are not good at math often make a sentence like this. If I were forced to answer ...


1

I think the ambiguity is taken away by two phrases in both statements: 1985年から2001年の間に...5%以上増えた ...もっとも大きく下がっているのは、1975年から80年にかけてである The first statement indicates that what is being compared is only the difference between beginning percentage and final percentage for the date range given. The second statement however, is comparing what ...


0

I think there's a difference between "what should be done" and "what the word implies it is doing". 手順 simply means a process or protocol and can be implied to be an ordered set of steps, in the same manner as the English terms "operational manual" or "step-by-step guide" would be. Now just because this is the meaning doesn't imply that the order is always ...


2

I don't think there is a special meaning for 向き合う in a sport or romantic context. Specifically, it doesn't mean "to connect". If you know a sentence where it seems to mean such a thing, please share that sentence so we can explain better. 向き合う just means "to face", and the object can be: another person, face-to-face (neutrally): 彼女に向き合って座る, 向き合って一礼する (...


0

There's a huge overlap between them, but if I'm going to explain the difference... 規則 is something you may follow or otherwise violate. This is easy. Otoh, a bit less common 規定 is just the way an organization is supposed to do its job. So, for example, when we talk about pay rules, it's 給与規程, not 給与規則.


8

Assuming "I" as the subject, The latter sentence, 会社をやめたかもしれません, means "I may have quit my company." simply because やめた is the ta-form (past tense) of やめる. Such a sentence is uncommon, but can be used: When you have no idea what you actually did in the past, and you are really not sure whether you quit your company or you are still employed. When you ...


2

The second sentence is grammatically correct. When you ask "does it make sense", you are asking if it is semantically feasible. The first is Grammatically: (subject) might quit the company. Semantically: (subject) could be first or third person. The second is Grammatically: (subject) might have quit the company. Semantically: Normally, (subject) ...


0

I think the answer is right there in your examples. You've used 規定 as a verb with する, but not 規則.「規則する」 isn't used. But as you've already noted, there is some overlap in meaning between 規定・規則. It may help to think of it this way: 規定 - 「規」を定めること・定められた「規」 deciding upon a rule ・ a rule which has been decided 規則 - 定められた「規」 a rule which ...


5

現在私は家を出て一人暮らし - Now / as for me / have left home / live alone そして由利姉とは今でも続いており - also /as for with Yuri / continuing 本気で結婚を考えています - seriously / thinking about marriage 「私」is the person considering marriage. You can see that the topic starts out as 私は、and the rest of the language that follows until 結婚を考えています is extending that topic.


5

The name of 「キヤノン」 was the registered brand name of the first camera model developed by 精機工学研究所 - Seiki Optical Technique Laboratory, which was later developed into today’s Canon Inc. The company was founded by Goro Yoshida and his brother in law in 1933. They named their first camera they developed as “Kwannon” after one of the most popular Buddhist ...



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