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1

The answer is somewhat blurry. The clear cut example are those born in Japan, to Japanese parents [plural], and are Japanese educated. These are clearly Japanese. The one where there is almost no wiggle room is the parents. There really is no half-Japanese in Japan. It's just half or more infamously "ハーフ". It's very much an all or nothing thing. My son, ...


1

Your translation looks OK. "there's been some vagueness as to whether person A and B's relationship is romantic or not..." Even though Person B's line is only 「ああ・・」, I would think he is a man. A woman would rarely, if ever, say that as a reply to a statement. "so for a moment I wavered on whether the sentence meant marriage or all romantic matters ...


2

『ときめきナーミンナイト』 a title of an episode from the web radio series Sayonara Zetsubou Housou, hosted by Shintani Ryoko and Kamiya Hiroshi. The title is apparently a play on a phrase from the manga かってに改蔵 (ときめきウーミンナイト) and Shintani Ryoko's character name (Hitou Nami). On another site this song is credited to 日塔奈美 (ナーミン). Basically, it seems to the theme song of ...


4

I am pretty sure what you heard was 「すこしずつ」, meaning "little by little". 「すこしじつ」 makes no sense. 「ずつ」, which is a particle, by itself means "per", "at the rate of", etc. For instance, 「[毎月]{まいつき}3[度]{ど}ずつ」 means "3 times a (or per) month".


4

This set phrase "別にいいけど" is typically used with complaint or criticism, like so: 今晩はカレーじゃないのか。まあ、別にいいけど。 昨日のテストは満点じゃなかったのか。別にいいけど。 This basically means "although it's not really a big problem." But I think this expression often sounds more curt/rude than it looks. It's almost "after all, I'm not very interested," "who cares?" ...


1

別にいいけど roughly translates to "Doesn't matter, it's alright", "I don't care, whatever", "You don't need to do that", "No thanks", "That's OK". It's something to say in response to someone.


3

中 means "inside" or "center" in general. 奥 means "inner(most) part". It has more of "hidden" or "deep" feeling to it. (Before the topic was edited) 隅 means "inside corner" (as opposed to outside corner).


2

It seems to be 汗のない社会は堕落だ, which is a variation on 「愛なき人生は暗黒なり。汗なき社会は堕落なり。」Google tells me this is a quote from 前田又兵衛. Something like "A life without love is darkness. A society without effort is corruption."


2

漢字はどう正しく書くのか、どう正しく読むのか、彼らは時々迷います。 See Section 2, いったいに~なのか. It is used to show perplexity 参加するのか、参加しないのか、ここではっきり返事しなさい。 See Section 2, いったいに~なのか. It is used to show impatience 「白」という漢字はどんな時に「はく」と読むか、どんな時に「しろ」と読むか、首をかしげます。 彼はどの大学に入るかはまだ決めていません。 See Section 6. I think のか used in questions (excluding rhetorical usage) generally fall ...


5

"What is the meaning of のか in the following sentences? Does it have the same meaning as のですか?" It appears that you may be confusing the 「か」 and 「のか」 used at the end of wh-question clauses with the 「か」 and 「のか」as question-sentence endings. In all of your example sentences, the 「か」 or 「のか」 is used as the former kind. 「どう/だれ/いつ/どこ/なに/なぜ + Mini ...


3

The other answers do a reasonable job of breaking things down, but I wanted to make a comment on why 「かもしれません」 was added by a native speaker even though the version without it is perfectly grammatical. If you look at the final, full, sentence: 何を言っているのかわからないかもしれませんけど、今は日本語の練習をしてます。 The subject of 言う is pretty clearly "I" and the subject of わかる is ...


2

Let's break it down piece by piece: 何をいっているか → What are you saying? However, depending on the context, this can sound a bit to harsh or direct (Japanese people tend to avoid this). As you may know, adding the の makes this less direct and/or rhetorical. 何を言っているのか → What are you saying? (not expecting an answer; not so direct) Now, add in the ...


1

It's certainly not surprising that the sentence confuses you, it consists of a few grammatical parts, so let's break it down a little bit. 何【なに】を言【い】っているのか分【わ】からないかもしれませんけど 何【なに】を言【い】っている - looks like you understand this, it roughly translates to "What are you saying". However, in Japanese when we refer to an action such as this one, we want to use the ...


2

「〜しながら」literally translates to "while {verb}~ing}. The form is basically basic verb+ながら "i.e. "緊張し+ながら". So in your example, it basically means "While worrying....."


1

ぽっかり/ポッカリ is an onomatopoeic adverb with a few different meanings. In your context, it describes how something is floating about in water, air, etc. (The most common usage is to describe how someone has his mouth open in a goofy-looking way.)


4

While either way is readable, Kanji is usually used for this phrase; a quick google search reveals: また今度:1,790,000 hits またこんど:213,000 hits EDIT: Used a corpus per earthliŋ's advice and got the following results: また今度:77 hits またこんど:7 hits A translation that fits all the usage patterns for また今度 is difficult but the best I can come up with is: "to do ...


4

The meaning is "that's all", in the sense of "(all that there is, I've said) before". The second definition of 以上 here shows that "above" is equated with "before", and the fourth definition corresponds to the usage you're referring to.


2

もらう - the most common use is when you express gratitude by "receiving" someone's action - 一緒に行ってもらう。 One more use is when you receive something from someone, as mentioned in the comment below: 友達からプレゼントをもらう。 受ける (うける) - when you receive something, but not personally from someone, such as e-mail. 得る (うる) - when you receive something non-material. Such as ...


1

The most common meaning of 世話 is care or looking after but it is often used in set expressions such as お世話になりました。 As you say it means "Thank you for everything." or "Thank you for everything you have done for me/taking care of me" but you might use it even if someone has not really done anything except be around, be cooperative and ready to help. It ...


2

世話 is a fixed expression that has a deep cultural meaning. I don't think it will translate well without the cultural background. I'm not sure where you got "thank you for everything" as a translation. I would say that's a semi-functional translation for when it might be appropriate to use the expression, but it doesn't explain what it means to say it very ...


7

っきゃ is an informal spoken contraction of しか, a particle. やるっきゃない means やるしかない. The particle しか is always followed by a negative of some sort, either an explicit negative like ない or a predicate that is semantically negative such as だめだ or あるもんか. Taken together, しか+ない means something like "only; nothing but". It commonly follows nouns, but it can follow ...


6

「日本」 means "Japan". 「来日」 means a "visit to Japan" said from the Japan side. "A visit to Japan" said from the visitor's country side, it is 「[訪日]{ほうにち}」. Here, 「来」 means "to come", not "next".


1

The ~て form roughly corresponds to the concept of the gerund from English. It is a non-finite conjugation that makes the verb dependent on some subsequent predicate to properly describe when and how the action is happening. In particular, it has a few special usages with various auxiliary verbs. The main point is that ~て strips a verb of any temporal ...


3

て is used for runnig on two verbs. In this case 出る and 来る are run on, so it become 出て来る. This usage is often used. For example, 走る and 行く are run on, so it become 走って行く.


0

For example, "to leave home" can translate into 家を出る and "to come" is 来る. Then, "to leave home and come" translates to 家を出て来る.


2

具体的に means "practically" or more literally "concretely." The addition of the に changes 具体的 to function adverbially.


8

実に is used as an adverb, for example to reinforce a feeling or emphasize a fact. 実に美しい。 [It|He|She|etc] is _truly_ beautiful. truly, really, indeed would all be acceptable translations (depending on the context). @DariusJahandarie suggested truly and it fits actually very well as it shares the same "truth" root (see my comment about 実 itself). 実は is used ...


6

実に means "very" in English and 本当に in Japanese. For example, あなたは実に美しい。(You are very beautiful).


1

Additional Info I've always thought that if you use ある, you have to use に. I learned recently that this is sometimes wrong. There's a case where using X に or X で depends on what X is. For example: Aセンターで大きなコンサートがある。○ Aセンターに大きなコンサートがある。▽ で is correct here because コンサート is an event. 5階建ビルにオフィスが5つある。(オフィス: Since an office is tangible, に is ...


6

Although it's etymologically a compound of 落{お}ち+入{い}る, it's now usually written 陥る instead. The NHK漢字表記辞典 recommends writing it 陥る and doesn't mention the other spelling at all. Some dictionaries list both spellings, as you point out; for example, 明鏡国語辞典 lists the word under 陥る but mentions the alternative etymological spelling: 〔表記〕語源を反映させて「落ち入る」とも。 ...


6

クラス at school can refer to: a group of students who learn together (このクラスには生徒が35人います。) a lesson, a lecture (5分後に数学のクラスが始まります) In kanji, the former is 学級, and the latter is 授業/講義. 学級 and クラス (in the first meaning) are basically interchangeable, but 学級 is typically used in elementary and middle schools. For some reasons, people start to prefer クラス maybe ...


5

No, this negative expression means "Not really", "I'm not interested", "I don't care", etc. I think this 「別に…」 is the shortened form of "別に言いたいことはない" or "別にそういうわけではない", and 別に here roughly corresponds to particularly. Something positive, like "これとは別のものが好きです" or "私はこれとは別に、言いたいことがあります" is not what the speaker want to say.



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