New answers tagged

4

I couldn't find this entry in any bilingual dictionary, and of the monolingual Japanese dictionaries I have access to, only my big dead-tree dictionary has this. Shogakukan's [国語大辞典]{こくごだいじてん} ("Big Japanese Dictionary") has an entry for [鉢]{はち}の[木]{き}, explaining that this basically means a 木 (tree) in a 鉢 (pot), like a bonsai. At the bottom of this ...


3

Here し is the pre-masu form of する, and equivalent to a slightly more formal form of "して". Here is another example of this usage: 彼はりんごを手に取り、食べ始めた。 He took the apple into his hand and began to eat it. In this sentence 取り can be replaced with 取って, though the former sounds a bit more formal to me. For the second question、であった is simply the past ...


4

し is 連用形 form of する.It joins the two sentences here. であった is past form of copula である. So the translated sentence will be like "The games in ancient times were magical rituals which involved predicting the future of a person or king and deciding their fate."


0

This is interesting. 違う was originally written as 違ふ. And, in 10th century, the meaning was slightly different. The original meaning was 互いに交差したり行き違ったりする (Two things intersect with each other. Two people try to go to each other's place and fail to meet.) http://kobun.weblio.jp/content/%E3%81%A1%E3%81%8C%E3%81%B5 There were several derived meanings ...


0

私 の 観点 は あなた の と は 違います。 watashi no kanten wa anata no to wa chigaimasu. My point of view and (also) yours are not the same.


1

That is a strong phrase. It is often used to start accusing or fighting. "You are so rude." would be close.


3

「[方]{ほう}」 has several different meanings and it seems that you are trying to apply one meaning of it to the 「方」 in this context where it is used for another. To be more specific, you are clearly thinking of the "comaparison 方" as in "A rather than B", are you not? In this context, 「方」 is used to mean "the side" as in doers vs. on-lookers. Tousaka is ...


1

In Japanese, one does not use "いる" to describe things that happen to be attached to living persons. You would use "ある" for body-parts, prosthetics, (internal) organs, clothing, hair, accessories, acne and makeup (although there are more appropriate words depending on what you are saying). The list goes on. The exception would be if whatever item you were ...


4

If I am placed in the situation you describe, I say "初めて会う人がいる or 初対面の人がいる". And I think we don't say "ああ 新しい顔があります!" or "ああ 新しい顔がいます!". It's the direct translation of an English saying. In addition, If the situation is in school, we call them 転入生 and 転校生. If the situation is in a company, we call them 新人.


2

感歎これを久しゅうした = 感歎(wonderment but 感嘆 is common) + これ(感歎のこと)を + 久しゅう(久しく is the 連用形 of adjective 久しい which means "for a long time" and 久しゅう is a dialect of 久しく) + した It means I felt admiration for a long time. However this sentence was used at a long time ago, it is rarely used now.


5

In this case, 「[久]{ひさ}しい」=「[長]{なが}い」 (temporal > spatial) 「Noun + これ + (を) + 久しゅうする」 means: "to do (noun) for a long time" In real life, however, we mostly use this phrase with a limited number of nouns whose meanings are related to "exclamation" such as 「[感嘆]{かんたん}」、「[慨嘆]{がいたん}」、「[三嘆]{さんたん}」, etc. This is elegant speech, if you are wondering. ...


10

「[口]{くち}」 has MANY meanings. I do not know about bilingual dictionaries, but this usage of 「[口]{くち}」 is fairly common and it should be explained in every monolingual dictionary. See definition 一-4 here: 4 [物事]{ものごと}を[分類]{ぶんるい}したときの、[同]{おな}じ[種類]{しゅるい}に[入]{はい}るものの一つ。また、その[種類]{しゅるい}。たぐい。「彼は相当いける口だ」「甘口」 That means a "(special) group of people or things ...


3

「[口]{くち}に[出]{し}しては[何]{なに}も[言]{い}わない」 「ては」, in this phrase, is just the 「て」 in the te-form of 「出す」 and the "contrast and emphasize" 「は」. In other words, 「口に出しては何も言わない」 is only an emphatic form of 「口に出して何も言わない」. = "to not verbalize one's thought" If you take a close look at both your sentences, you will notice that in each sentence, a person has a ...


0

(My Japanese and my linguistics are both pretty rusty, so grammar geeks may want to correct some of the details in comments.) The sentence is simpler than it looks. A literal translation (often a good step on the way toward an idiomatic one) would be something like: As for the six countries such as America and Europe, thinking “might not Iran be trying ...


1

Understanding the subject of this sentence is a lot easier if we unpack it: The sentence 彼{かれ}が来{こ}ないことを知{しり}ませんでした。has an implicit subject, and since it speaks of knowledge, unless it's a narrative, the subject is probably 自分{じぶん}; the self. What has you confused is probably が looking like part of the sentence; it isn't. Splitting the sentence up using ...


0

1 is the correct translation. Your sentence in question, 彼が来ないことを知りませんでした。 can also be written as (私は)彼が来ないことを知りませんでした。 or 彼が来ないことを(私は)知りませんでした。 Which, in both cases, is translated to "I did not know that he will not come." In your original sentence, the subject is implied to be "I" (私), but not explicitly stated. 「は」is almost always ...


2

Let me caveat this answer by saying that I've only been learning for a year and use of は is a mind bending subject. First of all, は does not mean 'be'. If you really think this then you have a serious misunderstanding. In your example the function of 'be' is provided by です. は is the topic or contrast marker. For me the distinction between topic and contrast ...


11

This sentence can technically mean both, but it usually (or almost always) means 1. To mean 2., we normally say 彼は来ないことを知りませんでした。 = He didn't know about the (someone else's) absense. because 彼 is the topic of the whole sentence. In other words, the use of が after 彼 more or less indicates that "彼がこない" is the relative clause which modifies こと.


5

Double contraction is taking place here. 「[忘]{わす}れようったって」= 「忘れようと言ったって」 which means: 「『忘れよう』と言っても」≒ 「『忘れよう』と言ったとしても」 = "Even if I/you/we said 'Let's forget!'" The last part of the sentence 「忘れられない」, of course, means "I/you/we can't (forget)." This construct, which uses the same verb twice, is very common. In its first ...


4

See this デジタル大辞泉's entry: たって[連語] [連語]《格助詞「と」と動詞「いう」の連用形に接続助詞「たって」の付いた「といったって」の音変化》名詞、活用語の終止形、動詞と一部の助動詞の命令形、一部の助詞に付く。上に促音の付いた「ったって」の形をとることが多い。ある事柄を認めるにしても、全面的にではないという気持ちを表す。…といっても。…としても。「登山―、ハイキング程度さ」「来いっ―すぐには行けない」「買うっ―近くに店はないよ」 [補説]打ち解けた話し言葉で用いられる。 So ったって after a noun, a dictionary/imperative form of a verb, or a dictionary form of an adjective ...


8

取っ付き (or 取り付き) means "starter", "first (step/impression)", "clue" etc. 大辞林 defines 取っ付き like this: とっつき【取っ付き】 ①物事のやり始め。初手。 「-から失敗する」 ②初めて会った時に受ける感じ。第一印象。 「-の悪い男だ」 ③ある建物・場所などに入る時,一番初めに通る所。一番手前。入り口。「-の部屋」「正門を這入ると,-の大通りの左右に植ゑてある銀杏の並木が眼に付いた/三四郎 漱石」 (FWIW, the third definition seems to be common in middle Japan, but I personally did not know this.) ...


2

This usage of 「[以前]{いぜん}」 is actually quite common. We say things like: 「ファッションモデルである以前にひとりの[人間]{にんげん}です。このような[扱]{あつか}いは[許]{ゆる}せません。」 "I am a human being before I am an actress. I refuse to be treated like this." Here, 「以前」 is being used to describe priorities in a given situation rather than a temporal order of things. Even though the focus is ...


1

[受け止める]{うけとめる} can mean to catch or stop a blow, but it can also mean to accept or come to grips with something. Given that [劣勢]{れっせい} means something along the lines of inferiority or an unfavorable/disadvantaged situation, then without further context the best guess I can field is that it means "to accept an unfavorable situation."


3

The two words are very different in actual usage. 中位【ちゅうい】 is basically confined to only as "middle" in high (top)—middle—low (bottom) tripartite system often used in academic papers (except for 中位数 "median"). 中【ちゅう】くらい (位 rarely written in kanji) has no formal definition and is the common word for "(around) middle/average". Synonyms include ...


4

It is a "commercial slang" newly coined from 「爆発的な誕生」(ばくはつてきなたんじょう), which means "explosive birth". It does not really mean "revelation", but there may be contexts where that translation might be valid. As a Japanese-speaker, I could attest to the impactfulness of how 「[爆誕]{ばくたん}」 both looks and sounds.


1

It's not a real word, obviously. It's probably an abbreviation of 爆発誕生, putting the words explosion and birth together. Bulbapedia takes this literally and translates it as explosive birth. However, I think the 爆発 also could just be making the 誕生 part sound more epic;「幻のポケモンルギア誕生」does not sound as exciting of a movie title.


1

出向く means to visit. the sentence 本来はこちらから出向くの筋なのだろうが means we should be the one to visit you


4

Both roughly mean medium, moderate, average, but: 中位(ちゅうい) is a typical 漢語 and thus used mainly in technical/scientific/formal contexts. 中くらい is colloquial. 中位(ちゅうい) tends to refer to middle position (in a ranking, hierarchy, etc), while 中くらい tends to refer to physical size/intensity/etc. For example, 中位(ちゅうい)の家 is not something we commonly say, but it ...


0

The whole dialogue is very colloquial, and it's quite common when rendering colloquial speech in writing, especially manga, to use katakana to render emphasis. You made no remarks, but the first word of the dialogue is a very typical example of this, which hints when we see the フッたん later that it's still the same thing happening. サイッテー which would be ...


5

フッたんだ is a colloquial way of saying ふったのだ. ふる: to ditch (someone), to dump (someone). See definition 5 in this entry. It's 振る in kanji, but in this sense, it's usually written in hiragana and sometimes in katakana. ふっ + た: te-form of ふる + た denoting past んだ = のだ. See this. So 私がフッたんだけどさ means "It's me who dumped him, though."


5

To break down: The main topic remains the same throughout the sentence: アメリカやヨーロッパなど6つの国 (lit. "six countries including America and Europe"). As I said elsewhere, this phrase seems a bit odd, but I think the author wanted to say "America and five European countries". And those 6つの国 serves as the subject of the following two verbs: 考えて and 続けていました。 So the ...


1

The sentence アメリカやヨーロッパなど6つの国は、イランが核兵器をつくろうとしているのではないかと考えて、経済制裁(=貿易などを禁止すること)を続けていました。 translates to "America and five European countries have wondered whether Iran has been planning on making atomic weapons and continued economic sanctions (such as cessation of trade)." イランが核兵器をつくろうとしている means "Iran is trying to make atomic weapons". The rest of the ...


3

You got the wrong idea about what modifies what :) Look at this part closely: 食べられない物が入った可能性がある If you isolate this part, it becomes clear that it means "inedible things that may have gotten in"(or lit. "a possibility that inedible things got in"). 可能性がある means 可能性(possibility)+がある(exists), so it literally means "a possibility exists". Now let's add ...


5

「[上]{うえ}」, in this context, means the "boss", "leader", etc. 「上を[失]{うしな}えば」 means "if they/you lost their/your boss/leader". Not sure where you get "losing again", really. 「と言えど」 is a conditional/hypothetical expression. And yes, 「[烏合]{うごう}の[集]{しゅう}」 and 「烏合の衆」 mean the same thing. It literally means "(just) a flock of crows", and figuratively means a ...


2

As stated above 耳をすます is an idiom that means 'to listen carefully'. If we translate literally there is a kanji for 'ears' - '耳' and a verb 'すます' which means - 'to clear' - so if we combine these it's - 'to clear ears' which is the same as 'to listen carefully'. As for translation of 耳をすませば, it seems that すませば is a form of a verb to include 'if'. So I would ...


2

This sentence means skills aren't taught but you learn them yourself by seeing old hands. This sentence say learning skills oneself by seeing old hands is "steal skills"


0

Though 一二を争う literally means to vie with another for the top, or second position, it actually means vie (compete) with your rival(s) for the top position or the crown. It doesn't make sence you aim at winning the second position in the race. There is no Japanese idiom to say / mean 十二を争う.


4

Yes that ハグレ is from the verb はぐれる and means "lone wanderer", "stray one", etc. はぐれ as a noun is definitely rare and is almost never used in daily conversations. But J-RPG fans are somewhat familiar with this word because はぐれメタル (Liquid Metal Slime in English) is one of the most popular monsters in the Dragon Quest franchise. Actually I feel her use of ハグレ ...


1

Possibly would be from the はぐれる(strayed-verb) made into a noun (stray - noun). Like 群れから逸れる strayed from the pack. So your sentence would be "yes, well, if that monster was just by itself. Or, if it was a stray, there wouldn't be any problem, but..."


2

譲れん is a kind of local dialect of 譲れない, which is prominent in the western part of Japan. As a Kyūshū-ite, I used to use れん, せん, and ん like いけん in boyhood instead of いけない daily and as a matter of course. …れん instead of …れない is used in similar way as …せん instead of …せない 眠れない→眠れん - Can't sleep. 食べられない→食べれん - Can't eat. 喋らない→喋れん - Can't speak. ...


2

There is a good explanation here: 【1】「[同義語]{どうぎご}」は、「あす」と「あした」などのように、[全く]{まったく}[同じ]{おなじ}[意味]{いみ}で[表記]{ひょうき}や[発音]{はつおん}が[異なる]{ことなる}[語]{ご}。 【2】「類義語」「類語」「シノニム」は、「あがる」と「のぼる」、「[遊戯]{ゆうぎ}」と「ゲーム」などのように、意味の似た語をさす。 【3】「同義語」と「類義語」とを区別せずに用いることもある。 (1) 同義語 refers to words that have the exact same meaning, but that have a different spelling or ...


6

Unless you have to do a verb-for-a-verb type of translation, you might consider using phrases such as: "I'm the boss/rulebook (when it comes to ~~)." "I'm second to none (in ~~)" because that is the nuance of 「[譲]{ゆず}れない」 in this context.


-2

I'd say it's "leave (it) to others" in this case


2

You seem to have gotten から wrong; it denotes a reason here (not "from"). それにコレだったら、あいつが持ってたから参考になる。 (lit.) And as for this, because he had it, it serves as a reference. And it appears to me that this あいつが持っていたコレ refers to something which is not directly mentioned in this excerpt. Perhaps this コレ will be described later, or it has been already ...


4

There are two words that read しょせい in 平仮名 and differently in 漢字. One is 書生, which means (university or college) students, some of whom served as a servant in dignitaries’ houses on the condition that school tuition, minimum living expenses, and petty cash are born by his master. There were many 書生 in pre-World War Japan, and they are featured quite often ...



Top 50 recent answers are included