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6

There is a meaning of 「それまで」 that you appear to be unfamiliar with, judging from your paraphrase. 「それまで」, in this context, means "(that is) the end of the story" and for this meaning, it is very often paired with hypothetical forms such as 「~~と言われたら/言われれば」,「~~であれば/だったら」, 「~~なら」, etc. ...


6

Literally, 各位 is a respectful way to say "each" or "all". So "All customers" might be a more literal translation. Practically, 各位 is often used as a suffix in formal headings to convey the meaning of "Dear ..." or "Attention all ...". These kinds of headings are often highly stylized and fixed, so don't let it concern you if the translation doesn't work on ...


4

会社をやすむ means "to take (a day) off work"; if the company was having a holiday it would be 会社はやすみです. So this clearly means "How many days did you take off work last month?" I am a BrE native speaker, so the American may well be different, if that's relevant. Oh, and I make mistakes sometimes.


3

You have the general gist right, but the middle line is literally "I won't hand her over to anyone!" //watas-u// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-uru// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-en//  (≡ //watas-i wa s-enu// ≡ //watas-i wa s-inai//) The //-en// is the same thing you find in 「ません」, it's a more literary negative form. If the grammatical explanation ...


3

The basic meaning is the same as 渡さない. There are two differences: The focus particle は adds emphasis to the negative. In order to add the particle, the verb is split into two parts, 渡し+しない, with the particle added in between. The Western negative form せん (from せぬ) is used instead of the Eastern form しない. No, it doesn't mean "cross over a road or ...


3

You can safely use the word 十分 to finish an argument, like this (in the ascending order of politeness): (もう)十分だ! (もう)十分です! (もう)十分でしょう。 「私は十分にあった」 would mean something like "There was a plenty of me", which is weird. 「私は十分だ」 would make sense, which sounds like "As for me, enough. (For others, let them keep arguing if they like)". 「もうたくさんだ!」 ...


3

I think I've figured out what you are asking about. Mental adjective + さ can refer to one's feeling as well as quality invokes the emotion. I'm not sure I'm able to tell their difference using English words, but you can paraphrase it with 〜と思う気持ち when it means the feeling. Maybe what you encountered was this kind of usage, where in this case 愛しさ = 愛しいと思う気持ち ...


1

I think that the second example, "これという問題はない", means: the "so-called" problem doesn´t exist. I would appreciate if you could give us the context.


1

This probably isn't the answer you were looking for, but: it has to be differentiated using context (via. the subject of the sentence, as well as circumstance). While this is probably pretty obvious, to break it out a little: If you say 「(太郎さん、)明日のパーティーに出られますか?」 to your coworker 太郎, it is pretty unambiguously the potential. If you say ...



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