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9

That says 「古{ふる}い歴史{れきし}」= "old history", not 「すい歴史」. 「すい歴史」 makes no sense.


8

Both sentences are correct, but 見えます is more common. 見られます sounds a bit awkward to me, because the passive form of 見ます is also 見られます. ('to be seen' rather than 'can see') You may also find people use 見れます ('見られます' without ら), which is often called ら抜き言葉 (ra-removed word). This is nonstandard and colloquial, and I personally avoid it whenever possible, but ...


6

I'm by no means anything more than a beginner, but I've both used (and had the skit script I wrote it in scrutinized for grammar and spelling) and heard 「まあいいじゃん」 used to say "it doesn't matter", "whatever then, it's okay if you're not clear on it", which are just slightly different words for "never mind", "don't worry about it", so yes, it is.


6

The first one is most likely the one you want. Here is how to think about the difference between the two: 見える is used when the scene naturally enters your eyes, describing your ability to see. I can see with glasses on. メガネをかけると見えます。 It's a clear day so I can see far off into the distance. 晴れているので遠くが見えます。 These letters are too small for me to see clearly. ...


5

Actually, there are many kinds of words meaning sin([罪]{つみ}) in Japanese language. Japanese Wikipedia has a list of links to details about each kind of 罪. https://goo.gl/ceJhFg More than 127 million Japanese people live in Japan now. Every Japanese person has human rights and freedom. What Japanese people believe are diverse. So, the reason someone does ...


5

There are few chances you could sense the difference outside some edge cases but, yes, they have a little difference such as... AたらB literally comes from "When A is over, then B", so it could imply that A has higher probability to be satisfied. A(れ)ばB, on the other hand, doesn't get along with an A happens as matter of course. 明日起きたら電話します。 (Fine.) ...


5

「日記{にっき}を書{か}いていたら(、)まさにお腹{なか}がすいてきた。」 does not mean: "I am certain to get hungry when I write in my diary." That English sentence suggests that the speaker always or habitually gets hungry when he writes in his diary, corect? The point of utterance can be anytime. The original sentence does not talk about what always/usually happens. It is ...


5

[暑]{あつ}[苦]{くる}しい means "hot, damp and suffocating / uncomfortable." If someone says 「暑苦しい」 in a muggy summer afternoon, s/he describes the physical feeling in the weather. 暑苦しい is also used to describe mental feelings in some situations, like the case of the sentences in your question. The nuance of [暑]{あつ}[苦]{くる}しく[語]{かた}る is that the speaker talks very ...


4

First of all, 「おつかれさまでしたどぞ」 is not a common phrase at all. From your description, however, I am pretty sure what was going on. The Japanese counterpart of "Over" used in wireless communications to mean "a message is complete" is 「どうぞ」 and it is often pronounced like 「どぞ」 to shorten it. Thus, I would think that the boss was kidding by speaking like he ...


4

「これで」 here literally means "with this", with "this" referring to the last thing that has happened. Translation exists for the benefit of the speakers of its target language, not the speakers of its original language. That is why "now" is a valid translation of 「これで」, if not a literal one, because "now" is usually the time when the last thing has just ...


4

The 出来 means [出来栄]{できば}え, 完成度, クオリティ, etc. 「~~するほどの出来/出来栄え/完成度だった・になっていた」 means 「~~するほど出来/出来栄えがよかった」「~~するほど完成度/質が高かった」. I think it's like: "(Something) was so well-made that it could~~" "The quality (of something) was good enough to~~"


4

どこまでドジっ娘{こ}なのよ、あの子{こ} あはは…ま、まあ、わざとじゃないんだし こういうのって天然{てんねん}が一番怖{いちばんこわ}いのよ 「こういうの」 here refers to the "ドジ-ness" of people in general. 「ドジ」 is a colloquial word meaning "clumsiness", "goof-ups", etc. The speaker is saying that among the different kinds of goofiness people display, the 「天然{てんねん}」= "natural, innate, etc." kind scares her the ...


4

There are four main parts to consider: な (the form of the copula before のだ) のだ (which has a wide range of uses and is highly context-dependent) よ (an interactional particle) さ (another interactional particle) The last three are all highly context dependent. But the character ends all of their sentences with them, right? They just pile them all on with ...


3

Choices two and four are out immediately because they both essentially mean "the moment ~ happens / as soon as ~", and the translation would not even make sense. As soon as I lost the election, I'll likely never return to the political world/scene. Both clauses make sense, but put together like that just makes a nonsense statement. Now choices ...


3

Yours is, I must say. This sentence would not lend itself to "perfect literal translation" in English because of its structure. Hard as you may try, you will end up needing to make adjustments so that your translation would sound natural in the target language. In your case, you ended up using the passive voice form "are influenced", which is not used in ...


3

「そう」, in this context, means "yes", not "so". (For fairness, one could argue that "yes" and "so" are related as they are both used for affirmation.) It is the introspective kind of "yes" that one uses to affirm and/or remember an event involving oneself. This 「そう」 is quite often used in song lyrics, light poetry, romantic letters, etc. 「君{きみ}と二人{ふたり}」 ...


3

In this context, 「ゆとり」 would mean more like "mental affluence" than "time". It would be synonymous to 「心{こころ}のゆとり」, which we also often use. One would, of course, certainly need to have time to obtain mental affluence.


3

「俺とお前の腕に大した差はないよ」というのは、つまり「俺とおまえの腕には、差がある。」ということだからです。「大した差は、ない。」は、「少しは、差がある。」「俺のほうが腕が上だ。/ 俺のほうが強い。」ということを前提として(当たり前のこととして)言っていることになるので、こう言われると、普通、ムカつくと思います。 Because 「俺とお前の腕に大した差はないよ」 means/implies there is difference. This is like "(I'm stronger/better than you, but) the difference in our skills is not so big (that I have to do 手加減)."


3

It looks like you already understand the feeling of 駄目だこいつ or 駄目人間 used in this kind of comical situation. Then it's the same thing that is referred to here. Simply put, she just said 駄目 twice for emphasis. You can think こいつら or 人間 is omitted in the first sentence. 「駄目だこいつら…ここは駄目人間の巣窟だわ」 or 「駄目人間だ…ここは駄目人間の巣窟だわ」 both makes sense, but these sentences sound a ...


3

普段、気が荒い流星が、「難しいな」という(気弱な、あるいは、女の子を気づかう)発言をするとは思わなかった という意味だと思います。 「そういうところ」 は、「なぜだ?」という発言から感じられる、気が荒い、あるいは、女の子の気持ちなど気にしない性格 をさしていると思います。 Girl2's 「そういうところが」 means she feels blunt part of Ryusei from 「なぜだ?」 and she cannot image Ryusei says 「難しいな・・」(= そんな言葉)


2

暑苦しい means the temperature is too high and offensive, in this case, how he talks is pushy.


2

I think that you are reading between the lines "correctly". Unless the larger context proves otherwise, what you stated would be the most natural and logical way of understanding the phrase 「冷{つめ}たいのは違{ちが}う」. It would mean something like "Me being cold has nothing to do with it." with "it" referring to the fact that she had waited (outside?) so long on a ...


2

You are thinking in the opposite direction here, which I cannot blame you for doing. In this context, 「おもちゃはいいの!」 means: "You don't bring toys to the bank!" In casual conversation, 「~~はいい」 often means "(something) is OK without ~~" or "(something) goes well without ~~". Synonymous phrases include 「~~はいらない」, 「~~はなくて(も)いい」, 「~~はなしでいい」, ...


2

I'm a native speaker of Japanese and also am a gamer, and I have to say this sentence is ungrammatical and hard to interpret, unless this おどおど受け (literally "timid reception") has some special meaning in the game you play. It may be some terrible typo, or maybe it was originally an emoji (like these) and then was turned into hiragana for some reason. Even ...


2

It is a common technique named 「体言止{たいげんど}め」, which is to end a sentence with a noun or pronoun instead of a verb or adjective, which is more "normal" for the language. 「体言」 means "nouns and pronouns" and 「止め」, "ending (a sentence)". This technique allows the reader/listener to finish up the sentence. So, it is all up to you. Most native speakers, ...


2

It's 激 for 激しい・非常に and the ギレ comes from 切れる・キレる, so it means "to snap", "to lose one's temper" in an extensive manner. Maybe you could say "to freak out" in terms of anger. Because it's 激, you're good to think of an externally visible behavior.


2

You are parsing the phrase incorrectly, which is preventing you from looking up the words in the dictionary. 「つい」 means "carelessly", "inadvertently", "by chance", "in spite of oneself", etc. 「かっとなる」 means "to flare up", "to lose one's temper", etc. Thus, 「ついかっとなってしまう」 means: "I (or someone) lose(s) my/his/her temper in spite of my/him/herself."


2

Yes. I like to think of まあいいじゃん as a short form of まあいいじゃない, meaning somewhere along the lines of "well that's fine anyways" or "that's okay".


2

Methinks 2) is a good guess. で in this case stands for "by", "with", "because of" or "due to". Meanwhile I don't think 1) and 3) are particularly out-of-point.


2

It hit really hard. I don't know if I can call it an idiomatic phrase, but punches, kicks, and so on can 炸裂 in Japanese. The typical image of 炸裂 is shown in this video: https://youtu.be/2yztv5QPp7o?t=1m13s



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