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12

In Japanese, usually 改善【かいぜん】 is no more than a neutral and simple word that corresponds to "improvement" or "refinement". The only fact I know as a piece of knowledge, which make this word somewhat "special", is that some companies like Toyota love this word as a slogan. Apparently, Toyota's special method of 改善, also written specifically as "カイゼン", has ...


9

It's just that 友人 is more formal than 友達. I don't feel there is any difference in what they refer to. For example, saying 「友人が会社を経営していまして。。。」 in a job interview would sound natural, but saying「友達が会社を経営していまして。。。」 sounds a bit childish. Conversely, 「ずっと友人でいような!」is weird but 「ずっと友達でいような!」 is natural.


8

"Do both [思]{おも}い and [想]{おも}い mean "feeling"?" Yes, both mean "thought", "feeling", etc. Can I just use either one in my writing? No, not really. Only 「思う」 is officially correct according to our Education Ministry. That means that in school, you can only use 「思い」. You WILL be corrected if you use 「想い」 in school. You will not see 「想い」 in ...


8

しょわー I think it's an onomatopoeia of the fizzing sound from soda.


7

友人 is more formal than 友達. I think this formality results in the side effect of it suggesting a closer friendship, because one would usually not refer to someone as a friend in Japanese in a serious conversation if they were not close, in my opinion. So no, they are not identical — there are situations where one makes more sense to use than the other — but ...


7

There is a metaphorical idiom "心に響く", which usually means "move/touch one's heart": 心に響くおもてなし そのスピーチは私の心に響いた But this line is from some science fiction or fantasy novel, right? In the second sentence, the speaker is experiencing something very unreal; the "consciousness" of someone else is wildly rushing into his mind. Probably he is summoning a ...


7

やめとこう is the volitional form of やめとく, which is a very frequently heard contraction of やめておく (やめる written in kanji would be 止める: to stop (doing something)). The て-form of a verb plus おく (originally from 置く: to put down) is a bit hard to explain concisely, but usually should be taken as to (not) do something now, rather than let things run their course. In ...


7

I think うち is a neutral and common feminine first-person pronoun, at least in part of Kansai region. There, people who use うち use it because everyone else uses it. As long as it is used with fluent Kansai-ben in an informal setting, I would feel nothing special about うち. Wikipedia says うち is used also by male people in certain regions in Kyushu, but I have ...


6

The "large amount" is the key here, and the flavor of 佃煮 is not important. 佃煮 is a kind of preservative food, and it is made when we have too much food. So "佃煮にするほどあった" here means "there were too many (Japanese expressions) which I couldn't digest/handle for now". But this idiom is rare. The more common ways to metaphorically say "there are too many ...


6

It is a pun. 「[絶好調]{ぜっこうちょう}」 is a word meaning "top form", "best condition", etc. And as you said, 「[蝶]{ちょう}」 means a "butterfly". Types of butterflies are named 「~~蝶」, so there you go.


6

First, a small list of grammar terms needed to read both OP's question and my reply. [自動詞]{じどうし} = intransitive verb [他動詞]{たどうし} = transitive verb [能動形]{のうどうけい} = active voice form [受身形]{うけみけい} = passive voice form Now, the phrases in question: 1) [夕焼]{ゆうや}けに[染]{そ}まる 2) 夕焼けに染められる OP says "自動詞 and 受身形" a few times, so it would not be a typo. ...


5

Informally, we say 「~~に[乗]{の}る」 or 「~~に[入]{はい}る」. Formally and officially, we say 「~~に[進入]{しんにゅう}する」.


4

"Kishu busshin" and "Oni te hotoke kokoro" mean the same thing. The first uses Sino-Japanese pronunciations which might be hard to understand if you're hearing the word for the first time. The second uses native Japanese pronunciations, which would be easier to understand for a Japanese speaker. It would be like saying some complicated word formed from Latin ...


4

The difference is rather huge. 「[送]{おく}る」 means to physically "send by mail or a delivery service." What you can send must be a tangible item. It can also be a person that you 送る to some place by a mode of transportation. 「[贈]{おく}る」 means "to present a person with something". That something can be either tangible or intangible. You can 贈る a favorite ...


3

My true feeling is that the expression 「~~も[何]{なに}もあったものではない」 should be memorized (and actively used) as a common idiom than be analyzed grammatically. It is an expression of "total" negation. "There is no ~~ whatsoever!" 「~~も何も」 lumps together things that are like or related to "~~". See ...


3

Apparently the word is indeed derived from "hormone" (source) but in food context refers to dishes made from offal.


3

I assume that you are looking for the object of the verb "感じる", because you're interested in the relationship of this line and the rest of the lyrics. There are three verbs ("感じる", "実現させる", "踊る") and two nouns with direct object marker を ("未来を", "理想論を") in the last three lines. When I read these lines, the grammatical relationship of these words was not ...


2

まわりで: Oh this is ambiguous... I think the speaker wants to say 「俺のまわりで (literally, around me)」 here, but it can be taken in two opposite ways... "behind my back" or "clinging around me". I guess the former is the likely interpretation here because it is preceded by "こそこそ人のこと調べたり", but I'm not sure. ああだこうだと言う: (((ああ+だ)+(こう+だ))と言う). To say various trivial ...


2

「[駆]{か}け[込]{こ}み」, in this context, means "last-minute"; therefore, 「駆け込み[需要]{じゅよう}」 means "last-minute demand". If you are doing something at the last minute, you will have to 駆ける = "run fast", won't you? 「[反動減]{はんどうげん}」 means a "reactionary downturn". In April of 2014, the Japanese consumption tax rose from 5% to 8%, causing a last-minute surge in demand ...


2

おりる and くだる both mean to move from a high place to a low(er) place. The difference is that the former focuses on the end point/result, whereas the latter focuses on the movement and/or the course taken. さがる means to go down or back, often used in relation to some value or standard. You also use it when a part of something (bodily or other) lowers from its ...


2

I think that the problem is that you don't realize that また can be inserted into その先, like その先の、その先の、その また 先 (のそのまたうーんと先) Further than that, further than that and further than that again (and even further than that) The lines just before have 心は気高く 心は気高く So, beyond that place where "our hearts are sublime", we'll (actually) "be experiencing that ...


2

のか and のですか are two versions of the same thing - both are questions with の - but のですか is more formal due to the inclusion of です. I wouldn't say のか has the same meaning as のですか, but it does have the same meaning if you disregard formality - のですか is the formal version of のか. In your example sentences, the のかs are in embedded questions (eg English 'I don't know ...


2

Firstly, the biggest difference is that the kun'yomi reading of 「おも(う)」 in the jouyou kanji list is only assigned to to 思う. In official documents, textbooks, newspaper articles, etc 想う isn't used. Though some busniesses will, depending on the business. 思う is used for general situation "to think", such as 思考、思案、思索、思慮、意思, etc. 想う has a more personalised ...



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