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8

That is 100% correct and natural; It just uses colloquial contractions. This sentence is written very informally as you could tell from the multiple し's. 出てった = 出ていった って = とて (とて means the same thing as としても = "even if".) This is not the quotative 「って」. 待ってて = 待っていて 私がここを出てったって待っててくれる人もいないし = "Even if I left here, there would be no one waiting for ...


8

「これからほんのわずかな時間だけ... テレビにおジャマさせてもらう事にした。」 The agent of もらう is the speaker, not television. The speaker is the one who wants to be the receiver of a favor. (In this case, he wants to make himself be the receiver of a favor by force.) There is no 「お[前]{まえ}たちを」 implied anywhere in this sentence. Is that used in another place in the same context? The ...


8

Your confusion appears to come from the fact that there are two different 「だと」's. 1) When 「だと」 is used as the colloquial form of 「であると」, only nouns can directly precede it. Here, the na-adjective stems are naturally included as well. 「[花子]{はなこ}さんはとてもきれいだと[聞]{き}いている。」 = "I hear that Hanako is very pretty." ...


7

Your understanding is spot on. In that sentence, 「それだけ」=「その[分]{ぶん}だけ」 = "just as much" However, I would be careful about saying that 「[人数]{にんずう}が[多]{おお}ければそれだけ」 is exactly the same thing as 「人数が多ければ多いほど」 in this particular context. This is because the latter phrase puts no limit on the number of people. Admittedly, I am not familiar with the story, ...


7

This is a good example of where direct or literal translation does not work well between Japanese and another language. We often use 「どう」 where English-speakers would use nothing but "what". 「どうしよう。」 or 「どうしたらいいの。」 vs. "What should I do?" 「どうしましたか。」 vs. "What happened?" If you used 「なに」 instead of 「どう」 in the phrases above, you would sound more ...


7

「[神様]{かみさま}、[仏様]{ほとけさま}、(one's own name) + [様]{さま}!」, trust me, is NOT something "normal" people would ever say in their entire lives. 橋本環奈 is not a normal person; She is a top idol. It looks like her agency selected that phrase in question as the catch phrase for her to use in self-introduction. The use of the phrase in baseball is the normal use of ...


5

ころ means "around", "about", or "(at) the time". So it translates to: At the time I'd just come back to London, ... Note that it's come to London, not come back from London. Other common usages include 子供のころ → When I was a child 高校生のころ → When I was in high school


5

「[割]{わ}る」 here means "to dilute". See meaning #II-4 in http://kotobank.jp/jeword/%E5%89%B2%E3%82%8B?dic=pje3&oid=SPJE04759100 「[泡盛]{あわもり}のコーヒー割り」 = "awamori diluted with coffee" Other common terms containing 「割り」: ウイスキーのソーダ割り/[水]{みず}割り [焼酎]{しょうちゅう}のウーロン[茶]{ちゃ}割り


5

コーヒー割り “split / divided coffee” No, it is コーヒー modifying 割り, not the other way around. Japanese is left-branching in an almost completely consistent way. Keeping that meaning of 割る, it would be “split / divided by/with coffee”. As others have explained, 割る here means dilute, by which you reach the expected meaning.


4

I didn't know of 泡盛 until I looked it up just now in Wikipedia but I think 〜割り is often used when you dilute a drink (probably alcoholic like 泡盛)with something else. The one I am most familiar with is ウイスキー水割り, which is whiskey diluted with iced water, often ordered by salary-men in hostess/entertainment clubs/old-fashioned Karaoke bars. In your case it ...


4

That is clearly two sentences and you divided it correctly at the end of 「[私一人]{わたしひとり}でいい」. 「[闘]{たたか}い」 is the [連用形]{れんようけい} of the verb 「闘う」 and it has the same meaning as 「闘って」, the inexplicably popular form among Japanese-learners. 「闘い」 is surely more formal than 「闘って」 but it is NOT for literary use only as you seem to have learned incorrectly ...


4

As in English, prayers are conventionally started by calling out the name of whoever you are praying to. 神様 "Dear God", "Oh Lord", ... 仏様 "Dear Buddha"(?) X様 "Oh X"(?) Lining this person's name up together with God & Buddha, it gives the impression that, e.g. the fan community is praying to X for winning the game.


3

Your observation is correct. In here, "それ" refers to "(人数が)多い", and "だけ" means "to such an extent" or "as much as". 「人数が多ければそれだけ」 = 「人数が多ければ多いだけ」 Another example: 努力すればそれだけ点数が上がる。 = 努力すれば努力するだけ点数が上がる。 (それ = 努力する) = 努力すれば努力するほど点数が上がる。 = The more you make an effort, the more your score improves.


2

As for your question, both が and に are equally common for だれ{が・に}これが出来るか while が is more common for だれ{が・に}日本語が分からないか. Because できる or わかる were originally intransitive verbs that meant 'appear' or 'split' respectively, they take a structure below. 私にこれができること = that this appears to me → that I can do this 私に日本語がわかること= that Japanese splits (itself) to me → ...


2

You're right that it's shortened from 出て行ったって待っていて. There are two parts to the sentence: (私がここを出てったって) + (待っててくれる人もいないし... etc. etc.) The first part means "even if I leave here". This type of construction is formed by taking the past (た) and adding って. For an i-adjective like たかい, it would be たかくたって. You can also make it with nouns or na-adjectives by ...


2

I think 少しでも is 少し + でも meaning "even if a little". In this sentence, it would apply to how the hiding place would make it hard to become a target. Translating quite literally: 少しでもターゲットになりにくそうな僻地 remote places which seemed like making it harder to become targets, even if by a little As for と, I'm not completely sure but it may mean "attempt to ...


2

Yes, it's a combination of で+いる with the contrastive は inserted. No, it's not で入る. When you use 〜でいる instead of 〜だ・である, the emphasis is on the current state (or with 〜でいた, a past state). In your translation, that's reflected with the English present progressive "planning on". In this particular example, the particle は is added to show contrast with the ...


2

As a non-native, I'm not certain if there is a perfectly native way to express this. Hence, my answer will focus on refining what's presented. Getting started, by using 汝【なんじ】 in the first half you're definitely trying to give it an archaic feel; if you're not deliberately doing that, 自分 would be a better choice. Using 歩く in the first sentence literally ...


1

I found it here. It appears to be a very formal word describing when two newlyweds have their first meal together. Given the lyrical content, though, it may be referring to this. 供膳 in this sense refers to a ritual where food is left for deceased ancestors. If the person singing is staring down death, this may be what it is. I am not totally sure either ...


1

It means what it says, but the severity of the accusation changes by context, perhaps this is because it is a non-indigenous imported word, although most know what it means, the social context has not been set as a norm, it could be a dead serious accusation, or just said lightly as in saying "stop hitting on me", who says it, and how matter. If you are to ...



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