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10

"What is 学校" is not an easy question; there are many definitions of it. but here's the summary: Legally speaking, "the narrow definition" of 学校 (aka 一条校), as defined in the first clause of the law called 学校教育法, includes public and private 小学校, 中学校, 高校, 大学, and so on. And it also does include kindergartens (!) but does not include so-called 大学校. Broader ...


8

To add to @Locksleyu's answer, 出す in "the continuative form of a verb (動詞の連用形) + 出す" can mean either: ㋐ そうすることによって外や表面に現れるようにする意を表す。「しぼり―・す」「見つけ―・す」 to make something reveal/appear outside or on the surface by doing the action, eg 「しぼり出す」(squeeze out) 「見つけ出す」(find out) or ㋑ その動作を始める意を表す。「降り―・す」「笑い―・す」 to start the action, eg 「降り出す」(start to ...


6

The very literal meaning of しわ寄せ is "gathered wrinkles", although only a few people use this term in this literal sense (Shirring is sometimes called しわ寄せ(加工)). To understand しわ寄せ, suppose you are ironing a dress. It's difficult to iron out the wrinkles perfectly; you iron somewhere, and a new wrinkle appears somewhere else. That's the idea of しわ寄せ; you ...


6

The first two ずっきり must be simple typo for すっきり (refreshing, clear, organized, etc). I haven't heard anyone say ずっきり for this purpose. The third ずっきり is a variant of ズキズキ or ズキリズキリ (mimetics for throbbing pain). See this. I'm not sure about the last ずっきり. Maybe it's a variant of ずけずけ (bluntly)? It must be very rare anyway... I think you can safely forget ...


6

老いる is a little bookish way to say "to age". The most common phrase now to say growing old is 年を取る. 老ける isn't really "grow old", but describing people become "older" than they really are, that is, they've got weary, out of blood, or lost youthfulness, often suggesting that they had a hard time. In its participle-like forms 老けている or 老けた it means "look old".


5

In your example 救い is not an adjective, but rather the pre-masu form of 救う, "to save". The grammar is the normal pattern of "pre-masu form" + "出す". However, rather than thinking of 救い出す as meaning "to start to save", I think it's better to just think of it as a separate verb, as shown in the dictionary. Based on this dictionary definitions, it mostly means ...


5

I've never heard of the name Madori, but according to some Japanese baby names websites (e.g. 1, 2) it can be a Japanese female given name. A(n incomplete) list of various kanji representations is given in the ENAMDICT database (via jisho.org). In any case, given the rōmaji transcription of a Japanese name (e.g. "Madori") it's usually impossible to say ...


5

It means that "soccer is (the) more interesting (of the two)". You can use AよりBのほうがおもしろい to say that "B is more interesting than A". In other words, より marks the thing that is "less interesting" and ほうが marks the thing that is "more interesting". Note that either the より phrase or the ほうが phrase can be omitted and left implicit. In this case, that is what ...


5

[人前]{ひとまえ}ではやさしく[生]{い}きていた しわよせで こんなふうに[雑]{ざつ}に・・・[抱]{だ}きしめてた First of all, one needs to understand (and appreciate) that this usage of 「しわよせ」 would only colloquially be "correct". For that reason, a dictionary definition of the word would probably fail in this particular context. Next, one needs to notice the antonymy between the words 「やさしく」("...


5

The answer is that they will return 90% of the amount you paid. The key is breaking the sentence into parts correctly. Given: 費用の10%の手数料を引いた金額をお返しいたします The main verb in the sentence is お返しいたします. This is a polite humble construction. いたします = します in humble form (謙譲語) and the construction お返し + いたします construction makes it really humble. All of this ...


5

Both sentences are correct and the same in meaning, but sentence B is far more common and sounds natural. For some reason, some Japanese verbs intrinsically have passive meanings, and they are used more commonly than the transitive verb + ~れる/られる version. See the following question for the list of such verbs. Other uses of the combined particle には This ...


4

First of all, this question is highly related to the recent question: Adding つき to the end of nouns 「つく」=「付く」 (「就く」 has nothing to do with it.) 「つく」, in this context, means "to come with" 「まで」, of course, means "even". 「[付録]{ふろく}」 means a "freebie/present" in this context. (The kanji 「付」 is in it; It's all in the name.) Thus, the sentence is saying ...


4

Yes 段差 usually refers to the physical difference in level, but in this case it seems to refer to the (perceptual) gap between June and July. I don't think this usage of 段差 is common, though. 落差 is sometimes used metaphorically in this sense. ナイアガラの滝の落差は55mだ。 (original meaning) 彼は普段と怒っている時の落差が激しい。 (metaphorical) I listened to the actual record ...


4

As far as the nuance goes, it is like saying: "After a (long) run/series of answers such as X and Y, there came Answer Z." 「~~と[続]{つづ}いた」 implies that it took a pretty long time for all the answers to be presented.


4

気を付ける literally means (I) attach feelings (to something). It means that you will do something with much thought. Therefore not being careless... Using this context, we can translate it naturally as I will be careful. It's like English metaphors of 'You are the bee knees!" or "A piece of cake!"


4

Two things: 1) Meaning of 「ボロカスにする」(active voice) and 「ボロカスにされる」(passive voice). 2) Meaning of 「Verb Phrase + がいい」 I shall explain both, but if it still does not fit the context, you will need to provide the context. 「ボロカスにする」 means "to shoot down in flames" - verbally, that is. 「ボロカスにされる」, thus, naturally means "to be shot down in flames". 「Verb ...


3

"I'm having some trouble understanding どの顔さげて, specifically in certain context." I would probably feel the same way myself if I were a Japanese-learner. That is because 「どの顔さげて」 is a cross between an idiomatic expression and a cuss phrase, and it is difficult to develop a feeling for the more colorful expressions in a foreign language. With the phrase/...


3

State vs. Action in Progress If a Japanese-speaker said: 「Aさんは[結婚]{けっこん}しています / いる。」, that would mean "A is married." It does not mean "A is in the middle of getting married." or "A is in the middle of his/her wedding." Person A got married (some time) ago and s/he is still married. That is the meaning of the sentence. It is a statement of a state/...


3

ゴミが落ちている here does not mean "trash is falling" (continuous action) but it refers to the state after the trash has fallen to the ground. See: When is Vている the continuation of action and when is it the continuation of state? As you know, 落ちる is usually an instant action. So ゴミが落ちていない essentially means the town is clean. Depending on the context, 落ちている may ...


3

You appear unskilled at Japanese, so allow me to break it down. 気{き}を付{つ}ける is to be taken as a single phrase. Literally you could say it means 'attach your mind', i.e. be mindful. In Japanese, pronouns such as I, you, and she may omitted if they are easily divined by context. Finally ます is attached to verbs to make them more polite, in this case replacing る....


3

You're on the right track. ワクチン (transcription of German Vakzin) means vaccine, the injected microbe specimens. 予防接種 might be better translated as "preventive inoculation". 接種 alone describes the act of microbe seeding, and 予防 part is optional, just for disambiguation from other 接種, such as planting mushrooms on the bed. So strictly speaking, the most ...


3

It's 懸ける, that is, the dream of mankind to lean on/speculate in/venture in the space.


3

It means to "encourage" someone to take action. http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E8%83%8C%E4%B8%AD%E3%82%92%E6%8A%BC%E3%81%99


2

Put plainly ,just translates as, 気{き}をつける I will be careful Some things just can't be literally translated in Japanese to English. So there is no way to really break it down like you would like to. 「気{き}」 on its own has a broad amount of meanings and when used with other Kanji or in conjunction with a phrase can take on quite a few meanings. ie, 空気{...


2

I think personally the original Japanese sentence itself sounds a bit strange...しわ寄せ, as the linked Weblio says, 他からの悪影響で被害を被るさま feeling or receiving the unwelcome or bad impact due to the action or the result of others' or other's conduct or behaviors etc etc. whereas, the Japanese in your quote 人前ではやさしく生きていた しわよせで こんなふうに雑に・・・抱きしめてた ...


2

As I'm not a lyricist, nor know the full context of the song, I don’t know the meaning of “こんなふうに雑に.” Did the singer live a rough life? Was he or she treated roughly? Or has he/ she grown into a rough character? And I don’t know what the singer hugged. But I surmise the line in question is singing something like this: I’ve tried to be amiable to others ...


2

From what I could google, this may be a reference to a episode called あははの辻, included in 大鏡【おおかがみ】 written in the 11th century (full text here). http://blog.goo.ne.jp/kyoto-ee/e/8f78ef49a315a26872575bb651f66113 あははの辻で百鬼夜行に その師輔が、百鬼夜行に遭遇した話は、「栄花物語」より少し後にできた歴史物語「大鏡」に記述があります。 それは、師輔が二条大路のあははの辻(今の二条大宮・神泉苑のあたり)で突如牛車を止めさせて丁重に平伏して、尊勝阿羅尼を唱えるという奇妙な行動をする。 ...


2

This 涯 is read as はて, and is a rare alternative kanji of 果【は】て (meaning "End" as in "World's End") Source: 青空文庫 桜の森の満開の下 坂口安吾 According to this question, 広辞苑 seems to list this as the possible reading of 涯.


2

The simplest answer is 来たこと means "the fact/matter/thing of having come". It is a "noun-ed" form of 来る. To the best of my knowledge there is no special connection between 来た and こと here (as opposed to other possible verbs). The こと is acting as a nominalizer (it converts the previous verb phrase into a noun phrase: eg 走る->走ること "(to) run"->"the matter/...


2

でも、それはかぐやが月から来たからじゃないの。。。 However, it was not because she had come from the moon. The first "から" is simply "from" and the second is "since" or "because". The tricky part here is じゃない after the 2nd から which you may not have seen. Here is means "It wasn't because of ..." This sentence is talking about the one previous to it. And the real reason for ...



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