Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

Or do native Japanese speaker not think about the implicit association with "east" in the name of their country in a way that would make sense to think of a western counterpart (Japan obviously isn't east or west to anyone who lives there) This is true. Many people know, as a piece of knowledge, that the etymology of 日本 has something to do with east or ...


6

“行きとうない” is the same as “行きたくない” in the standard Japanese. “私はもう行きとうない” means that I don’t want to go anymore. Hope this can help you.


6

「[緊 急 招 集]{きんきゅうしょうしゅう}とは、おだやかではないな。」 = "An emergency call-out is pretty disquieting, isn't it?" This 「とは」 is not for defining something. Both speaker and listener know exactly what 「緊急招集」 means already. This 「とは」 is to express a surprise, anger, excitement, etc. You did not expect it coming.


6

イギリス sounds like English, but actually イギリス is NOT equivalent to English. According to this web page, イギリス is an import word from Portuguese language. It originally means England, but its meaning has changed in Japan. It doesn't only mean England, but entire land of the UK now. So, イギリス is the equivalent to the UK. イギリス人{じん} is equivalent to British ...


5

An difference between them is that [怪]{あや}しい is near to spoken language and [疑]{うたが}わしい is near to written language in my feeling. Of cource both 怪しい and 疑わしい can be used in both spoken / written language though. Examples Here are some examples of non-swappable case. Example 1 In ordinary conversation, OK: あの男の人、[怪]{あや}しいよね。 (That man looks suspicious, ...


5

You are parsing the phrase incorrectly. It is 「~~も/つかの間」. 「つかの[間]{ま}」 means a "moment". 「Phrase A + も + つかの間、 + Phrase B」 = "B happens as soon as A happens." "No sooner had I looked down on the back of the cow's huge head than a pigeon popped out from between its head and body." (What in the world am I translating in the middle of the night?)


5

[一丁前]{いっちょ(う)まえ}にご指摘失礼しました。 I think it's like "Excuse me for pointing out (your error) like / as if I am a full-fledged member/worker (of the company/society)." ≒「[一人前]{いちにんまえ}に/偉そうに指摘して、失礼しました。」


5

Firstly, for the overlapping meaning of "real situation", 「[実態]{じったい}」 is used far more often than 「[実際]{じっさい}」. Importantly, this is just about the only meaning 「実態」 is used for. e.g. 「ショービジネスの実態」、「[山口組]{やまぐちぐみ}の実態」, etc. (山口組 is the largest yakuza organization.) Very few people would use 「実際」 to say those in reality. Secondly, 「実際」 has another ...


5

I would have to say no. 「キーウィ」 refers only to the kiwifruit to at least 99% of Japanese-speakers -- perhaps even more. Those who have lived in New Zealand or Australia might refer to a New Zealander as 「キーウィ」 among themselves, but that kind of private usage still would not count as an established meaning of the word within the Japanese language.


5

感じ(だ) is more colloquial than 感じがする, but I would say they're also slightly different. 感じだ doesn't necessarily have something to do with feelings, e.g. そんな感じ(だ) (It's) something like that Likewise 恋した時ってどんな感じなんですか could be asking about other circumstances than feelings, although feelings would be an obvious topic when talking about love: "What's it ...


4

It means "cute (and fluffy)". Imagine a hamster stuffing its face with food.


4

で, in this case, functions like the -て form of the copula だ. Thus, it's used to connect two sentences together to make a single, natural-sounding sentence. 私の名前はみのりだ。十五さいです。My name is Minori. I am 15 years old. 私の名前はみのりで、十五さいです。My name is Minori and I am 15 years old. This is the same as what the normal -て form does: 朝ご飯を食べた。そして、急いで学校へ行った。I ate ...


3

「[一]{いち}をいうと[十返]{じゅうかえ}ってくる」 The meaning and nuance of this phrase can be quite different depending on the context or the speaker's intention. Positive: Someone is always willing to give a full explanation. You ask one simple question and he will not only answer that question but also give you so much more related information. Negative: Someone ...


3

It means "not in the near (but further into the) future".


3

It's the format of a traditional Japanese joke in the form of riddle (謎かけ). The wording is kind of fixed and outdated, so you may find it a bit difficult to understand from today's language. AとかけましてBと解きます。その心はC。 Literally: (I) pose (you) A, and (you) answer B. The clue is... C. Meaning: What do A and B have in common? It's C. What comes in C is the ...


3

Here, 〜とかしたら is almost the same as 〜したら。Simply put, it can be said 〜お茶したら楽しそうじゃない? So why we use とかしたら? If we use とかしたら, there are possibilities for other options, while 〜したら explicitly set the condition. Ex. 次の週末に旅行したら、リフレッシュできる (If I travel next weekend, I'll get refreshed) 次の週末に旅行とかしたら、リフレッシュできる (If I do something like travelling, I'll get refreshed) ...


3

警備員 and ガードマン are both common, while the former sounds a bit more formal, and the latter is commonly used in conversations. I don't think ガードマン is less respectful at least in Japanese. 守衛 is not the most common word. Strictly speaking, 警備員 and 守衛 are legally different (see the third question in this page). 警備員 is the official name of a certain profession ...


3

そういうこと = 彩葉さんが、誘いを断って帰っていったという結果・状況。


2

The AあってこそのB(だ) means something along the lines of B wouldn't exist without A B wouldn't be B without A B cannot bring out its full potential without A The じゃないですか here is rhetorical, so the full meaning is something like Men wouldn't be men without flowers(women), would they... あってこその is fossilized to a certain extent (i.e. a fixed ...


2

earthliŋ's response has a link to a Japanese page that explains the meaning but for those who can't read Japanese I figured I'd answer in English. It basically means cute in a soft and cuddly way.


2

according to the link you posted (http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/thsrs/3345/m0u/) 疑わしい only means that the information is uncertain/doubtful. 怪しい means that the uncertainty/doubt is a bad thing. If i had to put it in simple terms 疑わしい would be 'doubtful', while 怪しい would be 'suspicious'. As background, it's being used to describe an ad that had a ...


2

Hope the following helps. 隣の奴から 一つ二つは 席を開けて by letting one or two seats between oneself and the nearby bloke unoccupied 無意識のうちに 間合いを取る unconciously secure a neutral zone (Caveat: this is not a verbatim translation.)


2

You are mostly on the right track. Those would not, however, be called "indirect quotes" if the words were not uttered in the first place. "Interpretation" is a good word for it as the 「~~」 part of 「~~というのなら」 is only what the speaker "assumes" to be true ; He did not "hear" it. 「というのなら」 is close to "if that is the case", "if that is what it means" in ...


2

It is definition 5-㋑. 「[上手]{うま}いモンでしょう」 is, in my own words, an "exclamatory rhetorical question". = "Looks awesome, doesn't it?" The "statement" form using this 「もん」 would be 「上手いもんだ/もんです」. So, 「モン」 does not refer to the scribble itself.


1

No, not exactly. In those phrases, 「これ」 refers to the occasion in which a non-positive action took place, not the action itself. This is why we say 「この[度]{たび}は」= "(on) this occasion" instead of 「これは」 in formal speech.


1

「~~というのだ」、「~~というの」、「~~というのか」, etc. added at the end of a question generally functions to emphasize the question itself. By adding one of those phrases, you are expressing the fact that you really want to know the answer because whatever happened that caused you to ask the question perplexes, surprises or shocks you. Does the usage of という have any ...


1

The phrase 「規則性のない」 surely can mean "random", but if you used it everytime you wanted to say "random", it would be regarded as an unnatural word choice at least half the time. 「規則性のない」 literally means "lacking regularity" and that is what the phrase mostly means to us Japanese-speakers. To call something 「規則性のない」, one needs to observe it for at least a ...


1

I would say 私に厳しくしてください (but do you really want someone to be strict with you?)


1

If you are acting overfamiliar, overintimate, etc. in order to be taken under someone's wing or to cadge for things, a Japanese-speaker might call it a 「[甘]{あま}えるような[態度]{たいど}」.


1

In general, fury is usually associated with fire/flame in Japanese, too. There are many figurative set phrases like "怒りの炎", "怒りに燃え上がる", or "怒りで爆発する", and so on. Now, 絶対零度の怒り is not an established idiom, and I think its interpretation should depend on the context. This phrase would at least mean 'extreme/strong anger' because it sounds stronger than simple ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible