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7

「[親公認]{おやこうにん}で[付]{つ}き[合]{あ}えるこの[状況]{じょうきょう}だけで、[奇跡]{きせき}と[思]{おも}わなくっちゃいけない。」 「だけで」=「だけでも」 in this context. It means "even just", expressing the fact that a seemingly bare minimal condition would actually look quite satisfactory if one tried to see it from another perspective. "Even just this situation where we can go out with our parents' ...


7

チケット: Tickets for theaters, amusement parks, sport games, etc. 切符: Tickets in general used for trains, buses, etc. 乗車券: An official term used by railway companies for a type of 切符. 乗車券 refers to a basic fare ticket whose price is calculated based on the travel distance. You may additionally need other types of 切符 such as 特急券 ("limited express train ...


6

「かけ」 comes from the verb 「かける」, which is a key verb with so many meanings. See definition #15 in this dictionary. To summerize the pertinent parts of #15 in my own way, it says the following. 「Verb in [連用形]{れんようけい} (continuative form) + かける」 means: "to start (verb)ing", "to start (verb)ing and stop in the middle without completing", "to be about ...


6

魂【たましい】 is something that is believed to persist after one's body perishes. After death, a 魂 may go to Heaven or Hell, or it may float around on earth (Hitodama), or it may be drained or eaten by monsters in fantasy works. It's a rather "occult" term. To refer to mind as opposed to body in academic and/or serious writings, 精神 is usually preferred. 魂 also ...


6

It's a phrase to express "despite doing it over and over". You can use it with other verbs e.g. 食べても食べてもお腹がいっぱいにならない、拭いても拭いても落ちない etc


5

I will try to concentrate on the usage of 「~~とする」 in your example as 「~~とする」 has a few meanings that are vastly different from one another. The meanings vary depending on the context and/or what words come right in front of 「とする」. It might be of help to remember that all of those meanings have to do with "making a decision of some sort". ...


5

Not an expert on Fukuoka dialect or anything else, but I could somehow read the text with no problems. 「~~ごた/ごたあ」 means 「~~のような」 = "(just) like ~~". You might be familiar with the word 「[如]{ごと}き」 that means the same in Standard Japanese. 「水のごたまずかおかゆ」=「水のようにまずいおかゆ」 = "rice gruel that tastes as bad as water" (It means the gruel is very thin.) Other ...


5

神 is sometimes used in the sense of "superb". For example, you can call a game you really like a 神ゲー. So maybe they are saying that the cross-section looks fantastic? Just a wild guess...


5

火の花 (building on OP's suggestion of 花の火) might be a good answer. For what it's worth, Mario's fireball is described as 火の玉 (= ball of fire) - not "fire that looks like a ball" or "spherical fire" but literally "ball of fire": 片手から火の玉を生み出し前方に向けて撃つ技。


5

「[流石]{さすが}!」 「[予想]{よそう}したとおりだ / です / でした!」 Yes, there is an important difference in usage and meaning between the two. (I actually have seen Japanese-learners use them incorrectly on a few occasions because they thought that both meant "Just as expected!" without a difference in usage.) When something that you have held a positive impression of ...


5

蘇生する can be used both transitively and intransitively. Basically it only means resurrecting dead people/animals. 蘇生 is also a medical term for (cardiopulmonary) resuscitation. 死者が灰から蘇生する (intransitive) 死者を灰から蘇生する (transitive) 死者を灰から蘇生させる (intransitive + causative) 蘇る is always intransitive. It can be used with 記憶, 思い出, etc., too. 死者が灰から蘇る 死者を灰から蘇らせる ...


5

Yeah, pretty sure デコグッズ is a short for デコレーショングッズ, which literally means "decoration goods". たも is a kind of a fishing net, you can see what it looks like if you search for it in Google Images. I don't know what dictionary you're using, but for example jisho.org knows what it is. Or were you confused by the fact that it's written in katakana here? That's ...


5

わかりあえない is a negative potential form of わかりあう (分かり合う) わかりあう:To understand each other / to comprehend わかりあえる:(potential form) Able to understand each other / comprehend わかりあえない : (negative-potential form) Not Able to understand each other / comprehend


5

'担当' is a noun to mean 'to take charge of sth.' 'さん’ is an honorific suffix like Mr. and Ms. as you know. "担当さん" is a vocative to mean "Mr./Ms. someone in charge of business." It's widely used when the name, title and position of a person who handles business, request, and procedure of a client, customer, and resident in an organization e.g. companies, ...


5

「(Name of profession or role one is in charge of) + さん」 is a very common way of addressing and referring to people in Japanese. 「[担当]{たんとう}」 is a person who has been put in charge of a task, and s/he works with/for you. You may address or refer to him/her as 「担当さん」. Translating 「担当さん」, however, would be a little difficult because this particular ...


5

循環する is an intransitive verb which can take を (e.g., 血液が体を循環する "Blood circulates through the body"). I think this は is replacing を, topicalizing the 三叉路. It effectively means 三叉路を循環せよ. It says something (one who is summoned?) must start from the crown, circulate through the 三叉路, and finally reach the kingdom. Some people seem to believe this line refers to ...


4

The literal meaning of さすが is that like "renowned (for doing something)" or "of established reputation", so you can see this word is only appropriate for the situations someone did something good as you expected, with the intent of praising the doer. In other settings I'm afraid it sounds out of place. Additionally, it's also used in さすがの~ (adjectively) and ...


4

There's nothing really wrong about 火の花, but without some kind of context it seems a bit odd. You can always add other words to clarify that you are speaking in simile / metaphor: 夢の中で花を見た。その花が不思議なほどに鮮やかな紅蓮色をしてて、まるで火そのものでできているかのように見えた。


4

It's pretty much what has been mentioned in the answers and comments: godly cross-section or insides, parsed 断面{だんめん}・神{かみ}. AS you know, croissants are intricately layered inside, so the comment is about how beautiful or awesome it is. Note this is use of 神 is pretty much an internet-only thing, and is not used in everyday speech.


4

In this sentence, なんで is a contraction of なので. Not the same thing as the usual なんで which is used in questions like なんで食べない?. なので means so (expressing consequence). cause なので consequence cause なんで consequence なんで is more casual, but not as casual as だから.


4

〜[三昧]{ざんまい}: to be absorbed in ~ だと: Here, it means he was thinking about something, an abbreviation of 〜だと思って... 帰宅: return home しようとする: to try to do something (often used when the action didn't actually complete) So, putting this together we get a translation like: It was then, on his way home after getting his hands on a new game, ...


4

「[話]{はな}し[合]{あ}って、どうすると?」 That 「と」 is indeed quotative as you guessed. If so, where is the verb that follows the quotative 「と」? It is just left unmentioned. In meaning, that question is the equivalent of: 「話し合って、どうすると言いたいの?」 「話し合って、どうすると言っているの?」 「話し合って、どうすると考えているの?」 Note that the unmentioned subject of the unmentioned verb 言う/考える, ...


4

「尋ねられもしないこと」 means "something that is not even asked." Breakdown: 尋ねられ -- verb 尋ねる + passive られる も -- binding particle (係助詞) "even" しない -- verb する + negative ない こと -- noun (事) "thing, something" 「the continuative form (連用形) of a verb + もしない」 means "don't even do~~", eg: 「知りもしない」 「見もしない」 尋ねられもしないことをこちらからわざわざ連絡するつもりはない。 literally means "We have no ...


4

It's a common rhetorical phrase, though not idiomatic, to express total unexpectedness. 自分でも(不思議な/びっくりする/驚く/よくわからない etc.)(ほど/くらい) It tells that what you did or felt was out of your own expectation. You could translate it like "so — that even myself don't (didn't) know why".


3

「[持]{も}ち[込]{こ}んだ[荷物]{にもつ}を[​商]{あきな}​いせず」 「商い」 means "business", "vending", etc. 「せず」=「しない」 in meaning. 「商いせず」, therefore, means "not selling", "not trading", etc. The whole phrase, thus, means "(Someone is) not selling the stuff that he has brought in."


3

The usage of 〜上で is a little tricky to learn but after reading hundreds of sentences using it I finally started to get a grasp of it. To put it simply, I feel that in the above passages it has the nuance of "when doing ~". This site describes 上で with two definitions, the latter which is: 特定の範囲内において、といった意味の表現。 An expression that means "with respect ...


3

I found the dialogs in the last ten minutes of Holy Knight OVA vol.2. Your transcription is almost correct. いいね……その喋り方……ごみは必死に奉仕しないと生き残れないものね。 カスが命を与えられて現世【げんせ】にまで生きてるなんて信じたくない話だ。神はむごいことをなさる。 The consonant //g// in the middle of word is normally reduced to [[ɣ]], which I guess you tend to fail to detect.


3

As already answered in the comment, "出過ぎず、足りなすぎず" as a whole is used as a na-adjective. 出過ぎず足りなすぎない完璧な躰 would be also fine and more "standard", but in this case 出過ぎず足りなすぎず is a kind of set phrase, so probably the author did not want to conjugate it. Similar example: 早い朝食 early breakfast 早くな朝食 (incorrect) 早くもなく遅くもない朝食 (standard) 早くもなく遅くもなくな朝食 ...


3

In expressing: "A means/implies B (after all, in essence, etc.)", it is only very common, grammatical and natural to use 「ということ」 back-to-back among us native speakers. (If it is taught otherwise in Japanese as a foreign language, that is too bad.) 「(Mini-Sentence A) ということは (Mini-Sentence B) ということだ / である。」 Applying this to your example sentence, ...


3

Try translating the も as "still". 持っていっていい? lit. Is it okay when I take it away/off? 持っていってもいい? lit. Is it still okay when I take it away/off? So, the nuance is the latter expects more possibility it could make inconvenience, thus asks more carefully on whether they don't mind. The difference is, however, minimized in affirmative/interrogative ...



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