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10

(~を)見つける means "to find ~~". (~を)探す means "to look for ~~". e.g. 探したけれど、ミーちゃんを見つけることはできませんでした。 We looked for Mii-chan, but we couldn't find her. 🐱


9

...ものとする is a legal turn of phrase you frequently find in legal documents, business contracts and legal agreements in such a way: 本契約書は日本の法律に準拠し、日本の法律に従って解釈され、強制されるものとする ー This agreement shall be governed by, and construed and enforced in accordance with the law of Japan. 住所変更の通知は、その到達によって効力が発生するものとする ー Notice of a change of address shall be ...


9

The main difference is in the distinction what is falling from where? Generally, things that are bound by the ground are said to 倒れる. Trees, buildings, people, poles, and so on. It also carries the sense of "to collapse". 落ちる, on the other hand, carries the broad sense of "fall" and often is not interchangeable with 倒れる. It's easier to show it with some ...


9

This 「言われよう」 is not exactly the 「よう-form」, which expresses volition or intention, but rather 「言われ + 様{よう}」, where the 「様{よう}」 means "a way to.../of ...ing". So 「言われ様{よう}」 means, literally speaking, "a way of being told", and as such, it is treated as a noun phrase. As for your question 1, 「酷いことを言われた。」would mean that someone had actually told the speaker the ...


7

I had to do some research to find out the answer to your question... Let's just, err, not discuss how I found this out. 「子宮がうずく」, according to the great internet at least, is an expression usually used under a sexual context meaning "to get really excited". And I mean, like.. really excited. I'll spare you the details, but it is generally used in situations ...


6

It's 「おお、さぶさぶ」, which is semantically the same as 「おお、寒い、寒い」. さぶい is a dialectal variation of さむい. 寒【さ】ぶい is not the standard kun-yomi of this kanji, but some people use it. い after さぶ is omitted here because it's an exclamation.


6

The Sino-Japanese 発汗{はっかん}する 'perspire' sounds more like a formal, technical term, like you might find in a medical context. It isn't particularly common in normal speech. Imagine saying this in English: Man, I just ran five miles! I perspired so much! Sounds pretty silly, right? The first sentence sounds like casual English, but then I use the ...


6

I believe ブームメント is simply a typo. Some people seem to have mixed ブーム (boom) with ムーブメント (movement) and came up with ブームメント. Watch this video, where one idol accidentally said ブームメント, and was corrected by others at once. https://youtu.be/Hl8V6vtdYIc?t=35s


6

When I was in middle age, I heard this phrase fairly often. 子宮が疼く- meaning a uterus gets excited refers to the sexual excitement of women, in bars and night clubs. It doesn’t apply to man’s sexual desire. Nor does it mean "I want to have a baby." The phrase was used in the headlines of yellow papers and subtitles of erotic films called “Romance Porno”, and ...


6

It's a fixed phrase: 事に当たる 1 物事を担当する。従事する。「式典には全社をあげて―・った」 (Translation: take charge of / engage in some work: "The whole company was involved in the ceremony.") (The linked entry also has a second definition, but it's classical usage. Forget it.) ように that ends a sentence should be interpreted as formal command. From now on, you should ...


6

Among these scenarios, 5匹目が好きです makes sense only in Scenario 3. 5匹目が好きです never means "the fifth smallest cat" in any of these situations. "The fifth smallest cat" is translated as 5番目に小さな猫 in Japanese (general rule is found here). If you say 5番目に小さな猫が好きです, it's at least a valid and understandable Japanese sentence. Of course, a normal person will never say ...


5

Seems to be the imperative-form verb 楽{たの}しめ together with the particle よ. 楽しめ 楽{たの}しむ is the original verb, which means "to enjoy oneself". 楽{たの}しめ, the imperative form, is formed by changing む to め. Imperative-form verbs are blunt, and are used in emergencies, in commands, to be rude, etc. Thus 楽{たの}しめ roughly means "Enjoy yourself!" (As a command). ...


5

These can be divided into two large categories. 上手い ≒ 巧い ≒ good at something, skillful 彼女は料理がうまい。 She is good at cooking. 美味い ≒ 旨い ≒ delicious, yummy この料理はうまい。 This dish is delicious. The difference between 上手い and 巧い is much smaller, but 上手い is "good" in general, while 巧い is closer to "technical" or "skillful". The difference between 美味い and ...


5

In Kansai we say 「~~んといて(よ)」 to mean 「~~しないで(よ)」, "(Please) Don't do~~." So いきなりはじめんといてよ means いきなりはじめないでよ, "Don't start all of a sudden." or "Don't start so abruptly". I would parse it as:「いきなり(suddenly) + はじめ(verb 始める) + ん(negative auxiliary verb) + と(conjunctive particle) + いて(subsidiary verb いる -- (maybe the といて is derived from て+おいて?)) + よ(sentence ...


5

The way I think of という is that it effectively puts quotes around something. So when you have "結婚したという知らせ", it's clear that the "結婚した" part is being talked about in a meta sense. To contrast that, if you just say ”結婚した知らせ", that can also be interpreted as "the announcement that was married". Though people can still figure out what you are saying, I'd argue ...


4

The Japanese term to refer to English progressive form (eg "I am sailing") is 進行形(しんこうけい). Every middle school students knows this term (they learn it in English classes). By the way, I doubt there is a special 進行形 conjugation in Japanese. This concept is expressed in Japanese by simply using a subsidiary verb いる, preceded by て or で, preceded by so-called ...


4

This そんななか essentially is そのような状況の中で, and means "meanwhile", "against this background", etc.


4

英語を公用語と考える means "to think of 英語 as 公用語".


4

I think the 神様も楽しむ in the headline means: 神様も桜を楽しむ(のか)? -- The gods enjoy cherry blossoms, too? or 神様も桜を見て楽しむ(のか)? -- The gods enjoy seeing cherry blossoms, too? with 桜を(見て) being left out. I believe 楽しむ can be used intransitively, as in: テレビを見て楽しみました。 (←more natural than テレビを見ることを楽しみました。) ゲームをして楽しみました。 遊園地に行って、一日中、思いっきり楽しみました。


4

I think ブームメント can be either a simple malapromism, or an intended neology combining "boom" and "ment" of "movement." It may mean a sensational boom, but I'm not sure. The word, ブームメント isn't a standard Japanese word anyway.


4

Naruto's answer covers it well, but it might be helpful to think of these words in terms of their analogues in other uses. For example, 上手い can obviously be connected to 上手{じょうず}, the basic word for being good at something. 美味い can be connected to 美味{おい}しい, the go-to for delicious." 旨い can be connected to [旨味]{うまみ} and the general sense of savoriness -- you ...


3

I'm from Ohita, Kyushu. In Ohita, we exclaim "オー、[寒]{さ}ぶ、[寒]{さ}ぶ" instead of "[寒々]{さむさむ}," when we go out of door, are blown with chilly wind, or get into the bathroom in winter time. I don't know about other areas, but「おお、寒ぶ寒ぶ」is quite a common saying in Kyushu area.


3

This probably is 「二人で嵌【は】め合【あ】いしておかしいですね」. 嵌める is a transitive verb which means "to wear (gloves/ring/etc)", "to insert (something into a slot/groove/hole)", "to entrap/frame (someone)", etc. I have no idea what the two people are actually doing because the object is omitted and the context is lacking. 合う after the masu-form of another verb means "to do ...


3

It's not so figurative, but yes it carries some connotations over the physical description. The word 引き締まる (lit. "be fastened tight") generally implies commendable evaluation with the impression of lean and streamlined feeling, self-discipline, sense of duty etc. as opposed to being just strained nervously. Of course, as @strawberryjam said in the comment, ...


3

They are both natural-sounding Japanese sentences, given the right context, so they are both 'correct'. Whether or not they have the same meaning depends on how you define 'meaning'. Do they describe the same state? Yes. Are they interchangeable for each other? Very much no. The difference regards how the information is presented - which part is information ...


3

It's the girl who is showing her 包容力 (to her boyfriend). 彼氏くんの方が攻め攻め implies the boyfriend was aggressive and taking initiative, and the girl was acting rather passively. But in reality, the girl was not that passive, but was intentionally letting him do as he likes (with her "broad-mindedness" ≒ 包容力).


3

Well, this sentence is certainly puzzling. I have seen 探訪 used in the sense of "visiting someone's house" several times (for example, お部屋探訪), but I can't explain why the girl said 探訪「終わった」 in this context, because she didn't want to leave his house at this point. One possibility is that she meant to imply "There are nothing more to talk about in this ...


2

Definitely not common. In the US, I don't think people would use something like the direct translation "My uterus is itching" to express wanting a child. To me, it has a more sexual connotation, to be sexually aroused, to want someone's baby. Whether or not the woman using this line meant that, I'm not sure, but I read it as "I want to go have someone's ...


2

The first sentence indicates that the writer cannot drink. Then in the next he goes on to describe how much of a lightweight/teetotaler he is by saying, "祝杯すらも盃に口をつけてごまかすほどである" -- his alcohol aversion is such that, even when participating in celebratory drinking of sake, he only goes through the motions of drinking by just touching his mouth to 盃!


2

nounになってる = nounになっている has become noun You need to be careful to distinguish between the large and small characters. It's なってる not なつてる and ポジション = "position", not ポジシヨン. I have no idea what a "mount position" is, but it (これ)has become one. Hopefully you can figure that out from the context of the story.



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