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13

According to a dictionary, 花つ月 is an alternative name for March, the third month of the year in the traditional Japanese calendar. (I didn't know that.) So 緋色の花つ月 means March in Crimson or something like that.


11

I think what's throwing you off is that you're translating ところ too literally. ところ does mean "place", but it can be used on a much more abstract level, such as a point in time or a characteristic. For example: 学校へ行くところでした。- I was going to school. (Lit: I was at the point where I was going to school.) 彼は高慢なところがない。- He doesn't have any pride. (Lit: He ...


5

「すごかないわよ」=「すごくはないわよ」= "It is not that great/awesome." 「か」 is a colloquial contraction of 「くは」, with 「く」 being the last syllable of the [連用形]{れんようけい}= "continuative form" of an i-adjective (「すごい」 in this case. 「すごく」 is the 連用形.) and 「は」 being a topic marker. This 「か」 is mostly, if not exclusively, heard around Tokyo. Other examples: ...


5

It's contracted with the particle は: オレたち+は → オレたちゃ


5

This も can be understood along the lines of "as well" or "too". To put it very verbosely, this も means "just like others" or "I guess we're not the only ones, but..." This kind of も, which vaguely refers to "unspecific others", occurs commonly in Japanese. To take another example, when a boss gives a word of advice to their people: 君も、もう若くないんだから… ...


5

It's お[利口]{りこう}ぶらないで言えよ、本音を。 お利口ぶる means いい子ぶる "to pretend to be a good boy; to act goody-goody"


5

とこ is a coloquial abbreviation of ところ, which means place. In that sentence, it refers the troop, not the position. If he said it in standard(non-slungy) Japanese, It would be 面倒臭いところに配属されてしまったぜ。全くよ. I'm not an expert, but a division is far (about 10 times) larger than a regiment in military jargon. So this 部隊 may be a battalion or a company. I would ...


4

It's [一体]{いったい}[何]{なに}を[騒]{さわ}いでいるんだ? or 騒いでいるんですか? "What's the fuss about?" in some regional dialect or the role language for old speakers.


4

としたことが and ともあろうものが are used to express the surprise of the speaker toward the (bad) behaviour of someone. With 私, it expresses something around the line of "Who could have thought I/someone like me/someone of my standing/someone of my position (would do such a thing)" Here are some examples from the 和英大辞典: 君としたことが, とんだへまをしでかしてくれたものだ.  You, of all ...


3

I think おかず refers to side dishes accompanied with rice, while 食べ物 refers to 'food' in general. When Japanese or Chinese eat meals at home, there's usually a bowl of rice per person and several dishes (e.g. fish, meat, vegetable) in the middle. Those dishes are called おかず.


3

There is a clear difference between the two. (I feel for you because I have seen 「おかず」 defined wrongly in smaller bilingual dictionaries.) 「[食]{た}べ[物]{もの}」 refers to any and all kinds of food; It just includes everything people eat. Anything edible is called 「食べ物」. 「おかず」 is different. It is what you eat with rice (or bread) in a meal. It refers to the ...


3

Without additional context, Japanese is ambiguous on the distinction between preterite and imperfect (which is what you're asking about, even if you don't know the terminology).


3

「[形]{かたち}」, here, means "token" or "by name only". A: "It's nothing more than a token leader, is it?" B: "(But) you get judged by your name at times, y'know."


3

It means kind of "tomorrow or the next day", accurately "tomorrow or another day if you can't afford tomorrow".


3

The Crimson "month of flowers". Or Crimson March.


3

バン!/ ババン!/バーン! is like "Ta-da! / Ta-dah!"


2

学研漢和大字典 【深酷】(シンコク) ⇒深刻 漢字源 【深刻】 ① 〔『深酷』とも〕態度や刑罰が非常にきびしくむごたらしいこと。 ② ふかくほりきざむ。 ③〔国〕情勢などが切実でいたましい。 ④〔国〕情勢が切実で重大である。 So as the kanji implies, 深酷 is an alternative spelling with a nuance of a grave or harsh or atrocious (酷い【ひどい】, 酷い【むごい】) situation. Perhaps it is worth noting that the Agency of Cultural Affairs considers 深刻 ...


2

To analyze this strictly by the actual words being used, 「とこ(< ところ)」 should definitely refer to 「[第]{だい}4[部隊]{ぶたい}」 as the word 「[配属]{はいぞく}」 , by definition, means "assignment to a department, divison, group, etc.". In real life , that is how we use the word as well. It is true that when one gets assigned to a division, one is often given a specific ...


2

大辞林 says 命運 そのこと(もの)の存続にかかわる重大な運命。「—が尽きる」「国家の—」 the keywords being 存続にかかわる重大な, that is 命運 is serious and may affect the continuance of the thing or person whose 命運 is being discussed. WWWJDICT gives "doom" as translation; I don't think it is a good translation, but thematically it fits very well, it's a kind of fate that may be the last fate the ...


2

It would have to be a typo for 「もたらす」, which means "to bring", "to cause", "to produce", etc.


2

The only part that's missing from your question is the translation of 人生にチャレンジ. He's saying that if he chooses a チャレンジ "self-challenge"(?) for his life (rather than an ordinary life), he might get hooked on whatever the challenge is and he thinks that then he may not be able to get married. チャレンジ implies doing something out of the ordinary (e.g., starting ...


2

I think '明日あたり' is more widely used but same meaning. 明日 and 明日あたり are different. 明日 == tomorrow 明日あたり == tomorrow but with some tolerance. It means a day after tomorrow is possible option. But not today. Because most people know today's own schedule. 25日あたり == In general, 24, 25 or 26 if today is not 24.


2

As @Eric says, あれほど means "so much" or "to such an extent". Best I can tell, this sentence says, "Given that you used to hate boxing so much, why have you suddenly become so seriously motivated [to box]?" However, as @oldergod mentions, あれほど would mean close "to such an extent", or "that much" rather than "so much". You hated boxing that much, what ...


2

A verb is surely omitted here. What verb is it, then? Think about what you could do with a 「さよなら」 in quotation marks. You could either say it or hear it said to someone and that is about all you could do with a 「さよなら」, isn't it? (Of course, you could write it but writing 「さよなら」 on someone's back would not be too romantic, would it?) So, the omitted ...


1

You have clearly got the gist of the sentence. 1.いたい is conjugated from いる (to exist) to mean "to want to be". Grammatically, yes, but the actual meaning and nuance of 「~~でいたい」 is "to stay (a certain way)". In this case, "to stay single" rather than "to be single". 2.From the 〜たい suffix, the subject of the sentence can be inferred to be the ...


1

My money's on onomatopoeia as well, as it's written outside of a speech bubble, like the sniffing sound くんくん and the gulping sound ごく, and it's in the same hand as those. We also see あー in this same format in the same panel as the little girl says 「あー!」. That being said, while しょわー sounds very effervescent, the illustration makes me think it's meant to ...


1

This is what the Wisdom Japanese-English Dictionary says: きっと 〖確かに〗surely, certainly; 【きっと…する】be sure [certain] to 〘do〙; 〖間違いなく〗without fail(必ず⇨①)〖…に違いない〗must 〘do〙 (!do は通例状態を表す動詞) ; 〖十中八九〗probably(⇨多分). In official language usually more elaborate phrases are used, but I am not completely sure about the usage of this one in any more or less official ...


1

頭 usually refers to a physical head, and here it is used in an extended, more abstract, meaning, front position. Compare with the use of the English head in a programming context: C++ header files. There's also the linguistic term head-initial. Thus, 声母とは頭に付く子音 says that a 声母 is a 子音 placed at the the beginning of a 音節. A few more examples: ...



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