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6

As far as meaning, 「やる」=「する」=「行{おこな}う」 = "to do" 「やりおわったら」=「しおわったら」 = "when you are done with ~~" 「やる」, in this context, means "to do". It is a little more informal than 「する」 and much more informal than 「行う」. It is an extremely common meaning of 「やる」, which has many meanings. See definition #6 here in デジタル大辞泉{だいじせん}.


5

何によらず (literally "regardless of whatever") indicates that the following part applies for every respect. I think you can translate it using "in all respects", "in every way", "whatever it is", "whatsoever", "all sorts of", etc. 何事【なにごと】によらず means the same, and is more common, according to BCCWJ Corpus. By the way, 生真面目 does not necessarily have the negative ...


5

The original: 「ところが、そうした人々が、神社や寺院の建物の前に立って祈願をこらす時、その対象である神仏について、それがいかなる神であり仏であるかを問われて、適切な答えをすることができるかといえばそうではない。」 Your TL: "However, when these people stand before the shrine or temple buildings and offer prayers, they enquire about the various deities enshrined there and consider whether or not they will be able to give an appropriate answer to ...


5

There is certainly a difference between the two, but whether it could be called "significant" or not would be up to each individual. 「便利{べんり}な安{やす}い物{もの}」 「便利な」 is in the 連体形{れんたいけい}(attributive form); therefore, the native ears would instinctively expect a noun to follow. 「安い物」, even though it is technically in the "adjective + noun" form, would ...


5

I think this is indeterminate. Person 1 only said "Oh, that's tough," and it is possible that he was vaguely describing the situation, referring to no one in particular. But saying 大変だな implies the tough situation was continuing when he said this. If he wanted to explicitly express sympathy with Person 2, maybe he would have said "大変だったな" (You had a tough ...


4

These are just typo for 日にちが合う (=schedules meet). This is the casual version of 日程が合う or 都合が合う. (In English meet (=会う) is used here, but that's probably a coincidence)


4

Japanese has a couple prefixes that are kind of like 'pseudo-' or 'fake'. エセ- means it's fake because it isn't good enough to be the real thing. For example, imagine a 'scientist' who takes themselves seriously but you regard as a crackpot, not doing real science. They could be an エセ科学者. ニセ- (or 偽{にせ}-) means it's fake because it's really something ...


4

It is internet slang that is used to indicate that the rest of the sentence has been omitted for one reason or another, usually to some comedic effect. The answer is explained in detail on this site: http://imimatome.com/netyogonoimi/ry.html If the site is forbidden, try viewing a cached version. 最後までハッキリと言わない時に使う、謙虚なネット用語です(違 ...


4

One could argue that 思う has meanings other than "to think", such as "feel" or "regard", but they all boil down to thinking and emotions. The reason you hear it so often actually isn't because it has separate meanings. You hear it a lot because it shows the speaker is uncertain or has quoted an opinion and is not necessarily a fact. This makes it great for ...


4

It's all about emphasis. Plain and simple 簡単です: "It's easy". But that's a bit abrupt for the Japanese speaker who doesn't want you to feel stupid that you need to have it explained, so s(he) says instead... 簡単ですね: "It's easy, isn't it?" This creates a little fiction that instead of telling you something you don't know and thus exposing your ignorance, he ...


3

I think this would satisfy you. After having googled, since I don't have any idea either, the word 銀星4型 is very likely to be borrowing the name of a vehicle which a character called Yamcha is riding at in an anime Dragonball. Here is a dictionary of the terms of Dragonball.... Excerpt 銀星4型【ぎんせいよんがた/02(015)-061(01)】 ヤムチャがカプセルにして携帯していた新型の乗り物の型番。 ...


3

Japanese still have gender awareness and often push gender role (or bias) against someone unconsciously. Expected behavior of man are being confident, deciding quickly, and hiding feelings, especially, negative feelings. In Japanese, these behavior are called 「男らしい」. In ウィズダム和英辞典,「情けない」is translated as below: 〖みじめな〗miserable, ⦅書⦆ wretched (!後の方が程度が強い) ; ...


3

It essentially means How convenient!. It's a short form for いいところに来たね. The literal meaning is Ah, you came to an opportune occasion.


3

I don't think サブラ is a common noun. This should usually mean "You mean Watanabe-san of Sabra?" where Sabra is the name of a shop or company.


3

「それ」 here does not refer to an actual utterance made. Instead, it would refer to 流星's logic, reasoning or way of thinking that has been expressed by the line 「…わ、分かった。嫁達{よめたち}の健康{けんこう}と笑顔{えがお}には代えられん。」= "Alright. Nothing could replace our wives' good health and smiles.". 「それでいい」 often means 「その考{かんが}え方{かた}でいい」 or 「そのやり方でいい」 and this one is no exception. ...


3

I would intepret it as "(all the things in) his vision are flowing past him, towards his rear". So maybe he was moving forward, or from the impact, everything around his was blown past him in a shockwave. This scene came to mind. https://youtu.be/DpezTC6-aZ4?t=259


3

As far as I know, 背後に流れる視界 has nothing to do with any existing Japanese idioms or slang expressions, and this phrase is kind of puzzling to the eyes of native speakers, too, if we have to interpret this logically. But we can stick to the literal translation ("the field of view flowing rearwards") and speculate what it means. I may be wrong, but my ...


3

You sure you're quoting their lines correctly? I haven't read the strip or seen the TV episode but found a similar dialog, in which Masao happened to be that last friend Shin-chan didn't ask: 同じまさおくんネタなんですが 初めてシロが登場したシーンで 捨て犬だったシロをどうするか4人で考えてる時 しん 「そうだ! 黙ってまさおくんちに置いて来ちゃおうか」 まさ 「僕いるんだけど…」 が最高に笑えました! ...


2

だ だ is called a copula, roughly translating to the English verb "to be" (is, are, am, etc.). It is not a particle but a suffix that attaches to the end of nouns and adjectival nouns (na-adjectives). It is used in informal conversation, as opposed to its polite counterpart です, which it seems you already know. Like です, its basic use is to equate two things as ...


2

へりくだる only means "act humbly, lowering oneself below one really is", so you won't know they do so because they're really humble, or on courtesy, or patronizing, or having other thoughts. As for alc.co.jp, where you find those translations, though they boast of abundance of information, their dictionary is basically made up by collective authorship, which ...


2

In it's purest form ます、ました、and ません are just conjugations. So a good example demonstrating the differences is to use 食べる (because it's breakfast time and I'm hungry). 食べます - I can/will eat 食べました - I ate 食べません - I don't eat For ございます, it's a bit more tricky. ございます is used as a polite form of ある, the verb for "to exist". So an example would be if ...


2

人情【にんじょう】 is a common (and maybe a bit nostalgic) word which refers to (good) human emotion. You can basically think 人情 includes 友情 (friendship), 愛情 (love), and compassion toward others in general. 人性【じんせい】 is very rare at least as a Japanese word, and I don't know how to use this term. Google gives Chinese articles about 人性 in the first page, although I ...


2

It's 年{とし}が行{い}く. The set phrase means "grow old". And it's not three-year-old "old" but really advanced in years. There's a similar expression 年{とし}を取{と}る, whereas 年が行く suggests more like the speaker is talking from younger eyes, in my personal sense.


2

Here's the basic difference. [noun] + をする: common; means "do ~". [noun] + がする: relatively uncommon; means "there's a sense of ~", "feel ~". 勉強をする and 勉強がする 復活をする and 復活がする 勉強 here is a noun meaning 'study', and 復活 here is a noun meaning 'revival/resurrection'. So 勉強をする and 復活をする make sense, but 勉強がする/復活がする does not make sense. Examples: ...


2

Is this sentence correct? Yes, your sentence is perfectly correct. and Is there another meaning that makes sense that I don't know? Yes, there are many meanings of する suru (Wiktionary). Your sentence falls under definition 11. From the link: 11(修飾語 + 体の一部 + をする)その人の特徴として、そのようなものを持つ。 青い目をした少女。 あの子は長い髪をしている。 Translated: 11 ...


1

First, I'm going to explain about sentence ender ね (not interjectional ね). It has several usages and among them, there's one that can be interpreted like English tag question. But there's a function that's shared by those usages. It is to indicate that information accompanied with な or ね is your impression or conclusion through observation (including ...


1

The purpose of that structure is making "無論、生き残ったのには理由があるからなのだ" into a subordinate clause for "彼は唯一の生き残り", in other words, those are one sentence divided by period. It enhances an effect like "He - of course, it's because there's a reason he survived - is the sole survivor".


1

This その is closest to the definition #2, 「聞き手が当面している事柄や場面をさす。今の」. So 'present', 'current', or 'immediate' could be the possible translation. And here その事 is used instead of この事, because the author of the dictionary is objectively describing 耳を澄ます as if someone else were doing that in front of the author. Besides, at least in the following idioms, I think ...



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