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13

+: 足{た}す -: 引{ひ}く /: 割{わ}る *: 掛{か}ける And you just say the terms normally in order. So your example of 3 * 4 = 12 would be 3かける4は12. Note that = becomes は, similar to how we use "is" in English. As @blutorange mentioned, you can use イコール to mean "equals," however in most situations you'll be good using は. You learn these things quickly when listening to ...


11

As Gradius said, the mathematical term “triangle” is 三角形, and never 三角. As part of compound words, 三角 also appears; an example is 三角関数 (trigonometric functions). (As for the use of 三角 in compounds words, I think that there is a general tendency to prefer to two-kanji words than three-kanji words when they are used adjectivally in compound words. See also ...


11

This is a great question. I searched the Iwanami mathematical dictionary 『岩波数学辞典』 and Sasahara's 当て字 dictionary, 『当て字・当て読み 漢字表現辞典』, and did not find a definitive answer. Here's what I did find, though: The word 函数 was invented in China, not Japan. The characters were chosen for phonetic value as well as meaning. It's possible that "box that numbers go into" ...


10

A distinction is usually made between positional numeral systems and non-positional. Let's use Arabic numerals as an example of a positional numeral system. In this kind of system, if we write 100, each digit represents a coefficient in an exponential series. Let's use b to represent the base: 1b2 + 0b1 + 0b0 = 100 Okay, so what about 漢数字? The ...


8

I do not have a definitive answer to either of your questions, but let me post my thoughts anyway because definitive answers may be hard to obtain. As for 1, kanji 函手 is also used, for example, in 圏論の基礎, the Japanese translation of Categories for the Working Mathematician written by Saunders Mac Lane and translated by 三好博之 and 高木理 (translation published ...


7

EDICT (which is the corpus JquickTrans apparently uses) has several special dictionaries for technical terms. The "Computing/Telecomms" dictionary includes such wonderful words as: 変数設定 【へんすうせってい】 (n) variable initialization 参照渡し 【さんしょうわたし】 (n) call by reference オブジェクト[指向]{しこう}プログラミング (n) object-oriented programming


7

It might be something as simple as: 三角 (something that is "triangular" where the focus is having attributes similar to that of triangles ie: three sides, three corners) 三角形 (a polygon that IS a triangle) For example: 「三角屋根」 is a way to describe a roof that is "triangular" in comparison to other roofs of different shapes. It has attributes similar ...


7

You're taking the third place (第3位) and you're either throwing it away if it's four or below (四捨) or you add one to the next place if it's five or above (五入). As a result, the third place is gone, and you're only left with two decimal places.


5

Numbers written in kanji are analogous in English to numbers written out in full. The joke would be just as ruined in English if it were written "There are only ten types of people..."


5

I think you're asking this because in English, we distinguish times from by: 3×3=9         three times three is nine a 3×3 block      a three-by-three block But I think in Japanese, it's just かける in both cases: 3×3=9     さんかけるさんはきゅう 3×3のブロック  さんかけるさんのブロック You can see that both uses are listed on Wikipedia's article for × in the same section (titled ...


5

You can read the arithmetic operators as follows:    +   たす    (足す)    -   ひく    (引く)    ×   かける   (掛ける)    ÷   わる    (割る) In place of the equals sign, you'd most likely use a particle such as は, much as we might say "three times four is twelve" in English to make a complete sentence out of it. Your example looks like this:   3   ×   4 = 12   ...


4

≦ is used everywhere in Japan, unless it's a paper written in English.


4

The correspondence isn't direct; if 位相幾何学 were loan translated into English it would be 位相 (topological) 幾何学 (geometry). Interestingly, though, 位相 means phase (i.e. of a sinusoidal function) as well as topology, and that means that the term 位相空間 is ambiguous between phase space (in physics) and topological space (in mathematics). EDIT: To clarify the ...


4

I think I learnt in elementary math that 22 % 3 = 1 would be read as 22を3で割るところの余りは1 Hence, I would read the example in the original question as 4を2で割るところの余りは0


4

The word modulo is read モジュロ, while the abbreviation mod is read モッド. In many programming languages, the modulo operator is written with a symbol such as %, but it still represents either modulo or mod, so you could read the symbol either way. Written form Reading ----------------- -------------------- x modulo y x モジュロ y x mod y ...


4

Find here http://ejje.weblio.jp/content/negation 4)〔数学〕否定, 相反《真偽を逆にした命題》.


4

There are two ways of answering this question. Are you looking for mathematical terms for 'not greater/less than' and 'greater/less than', or ways of expressing this in more general conversation? Mathematically, the greater than symbol > is pronounced 大なり(だいなり) and the less than symbol < is pronounced 小なり(しょうなり). The greater than or equal sign ≧ is ...


4

It is a little bit informal, but the language site that I always use to look up some word in Japanese is alc.co.jp It uses the Eijiro dictionary, and has pretty good coverage on many subjects. Hope this helps.


3

Don't they both refer to a range measured from a point on a scale? For numbers: 80%以上 80% and every percentage above 80%以下 80% and every percentage below For text: 以上略 everything above this point has been cut out (文章はここから始まる) (the text starts here) 以下略 everything below this point has been cut out So when you say 以上です, it's like a ...


3

Well, the 関 in 関数, 関手 is a replacement for 函, chosen to simplify the character set in usage. How logical would it be to simplify half of the vocabulary? Especially closely related vocab… I'm not sure it's a pun. 手 has the meaning of 取る, and a functor is actually a map from a category (a box, 函, since the Japanese word for function comes from a "box for ...


2

Which one should I use? If you talk to a medical doctor, a psychologist, a biologist or a specialist educated in a field related to medicine and life sciences, I think you should use いきち. If you talk to an engineer, a natural scientist, a computer scientist, or a specialist educated in science and engineering, I think しきいち is more common. Those are ...


2

I have been using JquickTrans dictionary software for years (had to pay $15 before but it's freeware now), and it has a few specialized dictionary catalogs that could be useful to find science and math terms:


2

http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q1122105076 mod は、modulo(モジュロ) の省略で、モッドと読みます。 Someone deleted his answer but he was also right in a way. a % b is also read a を b で割った余り.


2

You may wish to read Japanese numerals. So 1'0000 is called 万, which is also used in Greek as myriad.


2

I think the problem comes from "小数第2位未満", but not he latter part. From the sentence, it should mean that a decimal place after the second decimal point is generated. Like: 3.1415 ≈ 3.14 As the decimal places goes further, the actual number it represents becomes smaller. I think this is what 未満 comes from. It means: when a decimal place that is not big ...


1

Japanese people use the Arabic numerals "10" too. They would get the joke if you just write "10".


1

ya know sometimes what natives say can be misleading and not actually reflective of their intuitions. i think the difference is just as Chris says, "triangle" vs "triangular". i might add though that 三角 can refer to a specific triangle sketched on a piece of paper or blackboard in the sense that you can say "look at this 三角 i just drew, its prettier than ...



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