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3

(もう)ずっと~しない / (もう)ずっと~していない means "have not done ~ for a while." So this sentence means 1. That is, this person(?) wanted (and probably actually enjoyed) someone else's blood a long time ago, but it's been long since he did so last. もうずっと彼に会っていない。 I haven't seen him for a long time.


0

〇〇を目的に(して)〇〇する. The して is often omitted. This is just a variant of the very common AをBにする pattern. You can't remove both; the basic clause is 物語りはない where は is the negative collocating version for contrast (there are many types of stories, but few such as this). The second one can be removed without changing the meaning much; it just adds a little extra ...


0

を in を目的に indicate a object for 目的, it is 力石徹を殴り倒すことだけ in this case. I think first and second は are a topic maker and third one is emphasis. You can remove the emphasis は and first は but you had better not to remove second は. I don't know the reason. I think it is no problem it is comma.


4

It means something like He's always like that あの子 (or この子 if the child is nearby) is a standard way of referring to your own child in conversation. (だし)さ is displaying a mild concern (he's always playing with his food, he's always getting his clothes dirty, etc.) し is actually the listing particle ~し~し, but often used by itself for emphasis in ...


2

仇 is not an alternative form of 敵 (there's a word 仇敵【きゅうてき】). And aside from it, not being 常用漢字 doesn't mean immediately the kanji is rarely used. Kanji frequency distribution usually shows a long tail, and the rank varies depending on the source collection. According to @scriptin's investigation, 仇 is at #1951 among novels in 青空文庫, as well as #2280 in ...


2

Yes, the first は is the main topic, and the second is the typical "contrastive" は often found with negative predicates -- very nearly a collocation of sorts. And I suppose you could remove the commas without changing the meaning at all here, but it would hinder readability a great deal. I imagine the manga version might use line breaks instead of commas? As ...


5

Here is what the Dictionary of Iconic Expressions says, on pages 833-834: nota-nota M: The manner of moving slowly and heavily. nota-nota (to) (1) お腹がふくれてくると、普通だったらマタニティドレスにペタ靴で、お腹をつき出してノタノタ歩きますけれど […]。 Onaka ga fukurete-kuru to, futsuu da'tara mataniti:-doresu ni peta-gutsu de, onaka o tsuki-dashite nota-nota aruki-masu keredo [...]. When one's belly ...


7

"のたのたする" is a colloquial expression of "[無為]{むい}に過ごす / [怠惰]{たいだ}に過ごす" meaning "to idle one's time away" as well as "のらくらする." のたのた、のらくら、のろのろ, all are a sort of onomatopoeic expression depicting laziness, inactiveness and slowness. We use ”のたのた” and "のたのたする" in such a way as: この忙しい時にのたのたしてるんじゃねえよ - Don't be idle in such a busy time. ...


12

「のたのたする」 is a colloquial expression meaning "to wander around idly", "to act in a highly unproductive manner", etc. "What the heck! A big guy drinking like a fish and wandering around idly under the broad daylight!"


0

「とくら」is a colloquial deformation of 「… とくるは」meaning ① “speaking of,” ② “It comes out as …, Its outcome is …” and ③ “in addition.” In 江戸っ子弁 – Edo (Tokyo)-ite parlance, it has been used to be pronounced as […とくらア]. It was used in such a way; ①あいつとくら、いつも嘘(うそ)ばかり言ってやがる – (Speaking of him) he’s telling a lie always. ②あいつは性根(しょうね)が悪い上に、骨(ほね)の髄(ずい)までド吝(けち)とくらあ、...


4

So-called i-adjectives in Modern Japanese used to end with -shi in Classical period. Some boy's names still retain those old forms, such as たかし, さとし, つよし, やすし, ひろし or ふとし (conversely, they wouldn't name their boys in Modern adjective forms like たかい, さとい, つよい etc). There's one more thing that Japanese names often contain some "unordinary" kun'yomi of kanji ...


1

I believe it might just be a person name. One of the readings of 太 is indeed ふとし when used as a proper name. Look here for example.


4

「~~とくら」 is a colloquial and masculine Tokyo way of pronouncing 「~~と + くる + わ」. The contraction just so quintessentially sounds Tokyo. (Unlike what so many J-learners seem to firmly believe, this 「わ」 is not a feminine sentence-ender.) I am going to call this 「と」 quotative just because there is no other explanation that seems feasible in my brain. 「~~とくら」,...


0

It's slurred …と来るわ (or possibly …と来れば but in this case it's the former, if I remember correctly).


5

「いうないっ」 is a form of negative imperative, the dictionary form of which would be 「いうな」. It sounds masculine and very informal. You could call 「いうないっ」 dialectal because it is not used all over Japan. You will hear it around Tokyo for sure, but not really in Western Japan to my knowledge. We certainly do not say it around Nagoya, which is right in the ...


3

I think your guess about 這う is correct, except it causative form which means "to make crawl". Normally that is 這わせて, however it seems that in some dialects せ can change to し, so you end up with はわして. Here is one thread which discuses saying 見して instead of 見せて. The overall tone of this line is pretty harsh, and sounds like it was said by a pretty scary guy....


5

「なりたかねえ」=「なりたくはない」 The former is an informal and mostly-masculine way of saying the latter (dictionary form) around Tokyo. One might safely call it the "tough guy speech". Guys just talk like that around Tokyo when they hang around with close friends. Calling this kind of speech old or outdated is sheer nonsense. It is 100% current. I have lived in ...


1

I'm a native Japanese speaker. I can't post a comment to another writing thanks to a lack of reputation, so I will write here. In my opinion, なりたかねえ is "oral expression" rather than "tough guy like", and it is sometimes used even now. Actually I think sophisticated lady never uses this expression, but I know some girl in a very famous anime often uses almost ...


-3

It looks like very old Japanese, but you are correct it is this 「なりたくない」 Loosely translated. せんべいになりたかねえやつあ おとなしくわきへ どいてろっ。 Be good and get out of the way if you don't want to get flattened. EDIT: To clarify in regards to the comment that this dialect/expression is a current one. This type of dialect was once very much widely used, specifically ...


0

I agree with l'électeur, but it might just be a spelling mistake. I and U are next to each other on the keyboard.


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-form to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


11

I would say that it is only a lisping pronunciation of 「たすけて」 = "Help!" I would not call it dialectal unless this character says other words or phrases that are clearly dialectal.


4

in this case, 助けて【たすけて:tasukete】is right. (means "help me.")


1

Just to add to Brandon's answer, 「あんさんたち」is rarely used by the younger generation these days. In my line of work I hear it every now and again, but only ever said by the older generation.


3

Pretty simple transformation into standard Japanese; you were on the right track: 待ちなさい、あなたたち。


3

What he is saying in this sentence is, 「だめだっ...なぐろうがけとばそうがびくともしやせん」 Its no good, its doesn't matter if punch or kick him/it nothing affects him/it. Yes, 「が」is working the same function in this case. And to answer the second question, you can't replace the first「が」with 「と」or 「や」. This another way to re-phrase this. だめだっ...殴{なぐ}っても蹴{け}っ飛{と}...



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