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3

This pattern is so common that it has a special name, a cleft sentence. 向かっているのは特別棟か。 So it's Special Building that we're heading to. verb + のは + whatever + だ/です is a basic pattern of cleft sentences, and it's similar to it's + whatever + that/who + verb pattern in English. の here is something like a dummy pronoun, and 特別棟 is the word that is focused....


3

One Piece is set in a fictional world, but the setting is clearly not Japan. Actually, apart from Zoro's swords I can't remember anything that is related to Japan. In this world 記録指針{きろくししん} sounds like a poor translation of some "original" word; ログポーズ sounds much more authentic, but you have no idea what it means (not even if you figure out the English ...


5

Some writers like to do it because it adds meaning to what may otherwise be incoherent sounds. This works even for me, a native English speaker: I've never read any One Piece, so I have no idea what "Log Pose" or "Poneglyph" mean. But if their names are written as kanji with furigana applied, I can take a guess at what kind of thing they are. It works even ...


1

It's obvious that it means "I have only one" here though it's technically a nonsensical phrase that mixes たった ひとつ きり(だが)with たった ひとつ きり しか ない. (きり is equivalent to だけ.) なまじ means "half-way" or "not thoroughly". 本人の為を思っているこの目: this eye that thinks of his own benefit なまじの肉親以上に: more than his mere real parents たったひとつっきりないが * : though it's only one


1

I don't believe it has a name, but it is basically a representation of a face + triple "! rays". Take a look at the top left panel of your example 2 - there the rays are radiating from an actual face.


0

Just an impression: If your illustrator/author made-up this symbol, it looks to me like it expresses surprise as in, "Oh!" in context with the character's emotions. It may be more an expression of feeling than saying, (or having the character say) "Oh!" in surprise.


7

The other answers are mainly correct, but they leave out the part that this is usage of 黙っとる or 黙っとれ are still common in certain dialects, mainly western Japan. Some say the dividing line is somewhere between Shizuoka prefecture and Aichi prefecture. Once you go west of Aichi prefecture you hear the とる form a lot, like in phrases as 知っとる (知っている) or やっとる (...


7

There is another subsidiary verb, おる, in its imperative form. 黙っておる can be contracted to 黙っとる (see this chart). おる is mainly used to make a humble expression, but it's also used as an arrogant, dialectal or a bit old-fashioned version of simple いる. お・る〔をる〕【▽居る】 ㋑「いる」の古風な、または尊大な言い方。また、「いる」に比べて方言的な響きを帯びる。「君はそこに―・ったのか」「都会にはセミも―・らんようになった」 So it just ...


-1

「せんでもいいのか」 = 「しなくてもいいのか」 「せん」 = 「しない」 せん・せぇへん is a common way to say しない especially in Kansai. You can see something similar in the Standard Japanese「すみません」 In 時代劇 on TV, they often say せぬ which is a literary equivalent of せん.


3

In this phrase, せん is not 線。 せん is しない (don't do) in some dialects. I think the blank between したくを and せん makes it difficult for you to understand. したくをせん means "don't prepare". したく (支度 in kanji) is preparation. So the phrase ジョーにあいにいくしたくを せんでもいいのか means "Would it be okay for you to be not prepared to meet Joe?"


3

Yes, it's short for やってやる. Please see this answer for the list of similar contractions. I think this contraction is common throughout Japan regardless of generation (but it sounds relatively masculine) And te-form + やる means not only "to do something for someone" but also "dare to do something", "to do something proactively with an active effort", etc. See: ...


3

Did you notice the same guy said 噛みまくった in the next frame? Here 噛む is a slangy expression meaning "to falter" (see the fifth definition in jisho.org). The original sentence is: だいたいこんな感じじゃないですか.


3

Yes it's やり (masu-stem of やる) + まくり (masu-stem of まくる). やる: See the eleventh definition of やる on jisho.org. masu-stem + まくる: "to do a lot of..." It's the second definition of まくる on jisho.org. まくり is in the masu-stem form so that it works as a noun. See this.


5

I think you are confused because you are trying to distinguish と and なり while it is just a single word: となり, or 隣 in kanji, that means "neighbor/next to (as in living next door)". This should clarify your doubt I hope.


3

I guess it is simply because when it comes to people names there are sometimes just a lot more readings than usual. Have you tried to look as well on some 人名漢字辞典? If you look 驍 up here for example, "Takeru" is listed as a possible reading. There is a discussion about the readings of such kanji here as well. Hope it helps, as simple as the answer is.



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