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14

I have a friend (anecdotal, of course) who has lived in Japan for 11 years. He learned Japanese only 3 ways: (a) girlfriends, (b) manga & anime, and (c) male Japanese friends. His pronunciation is very natural; he's so comfortable in the dirtier parts of the language that he can bawl out a taxi driver. I've witnessed him tear apart a guy on the street ...


13

While i agree with you that there is a lot of Japanese from anime that can't be used in daily conversation, it can still be a valuable learning tool in ear training, pronunciation, culture acquisition and vocabulary acquisition. And knowing the culture goes along way towards learning how the language is used.


9

The small ぇ in 手ぇふった is a way of indicating in writing the compensatory lengthening of the vowel in a single-mora word that sometimes occurs when the following case particle を is omitted in familiar speech. This is described in The Phonology of Japanese (Labrune 2012) in section 2.7.5, 'Prosodic Lengthening'. So as Yang Muye says, it means 手をふった.


9

年をとる means to grow old, to age. Next time try a dictionary first.


9

からかい上手の高木さん refers to Takagi-san as good at teasing. In this context, the からかい上手 is an adjective, which always come before the noun in Japanese, even where subordinate clauses would be used in English. If it were written the other way around, it would be talking about Takagi-san's skillful teasing (where teasing is the topic rather than Takagi-san). ...


9

うぃっく It's an imitative sound of a hiccup often used to describe drunk people.


8

It is 「は」, not 「わ」. The 「は」 here is of course pronounced 「わ」 because it is a particle. 「もう[早送]{はやおく}りでよいのでは!」 = 「もう早送りでよいのではないか (ないだろうか, ないでしょうか, etc.)!」 The last part is not said but is understood between the speaker and listener. This happens so very often in Japanese. "Maybe we should just fast-forward it from here on?" 「のでは」 is used to make a ...


7

Your first translation, "It could have become something better." is very good translation. Literally, reading just one phrase ならなかった, it means "did not become". (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかった。 (It didn't become more cheaper.) In other cases - connected with ものか(もんか) for example - the meaning of ならなかった will change. (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかったものか。 (This ...


7

It means somethng like "So, ~~" used when trying to wrap up a convo or explanation. It is mostly an attention-drawer than a meaningful phrase. The 「と」 is, believe it or not, a quotative particle used to refer to the over-all content of the speaker's statement that is now ending.


7

「ぶったてる」=「ぶっ建てる」= "to build" 「ぶっ」 is a manly and slangy verb prefix that emphasizes the meaning of the verb. https://kotobank.jp/word/%E6%89%93%E3%81%A3-618986#E5.A4.A7.E8.BE.9E.E6.9E.97.20.E7.AC.AC.E4.B8.89.E7.89.88 Related verb prefixes for emphasis: 「おっ」、「かっ」、「つっ」、「つん」、「とっ」、「ひっ」、「ひん」、「ぶち」、「ぶん」, etc. There should be a few more.


7

「ようく/よーく」 is an exaggerated pronunciation of 「よく」, which is why it is not found in the dictionary. 「ようくきく」=「良く聞く」


7

To answer this question, the two usages of 「ごとき」 would need to be explained as they actually are quite different from each other. 1) Neutral 「ごとき」 A (somewhat) literary word that is, in meaning, the equivalent of 「~~ような」,「まるで~~のような」, etc. in modern Japanese. Examples: 「そのタクシーは[飛]{と}ぶがごときスピードで[去]{さ}っていった。」= "The taxi just whizzed by at a flying ...


6

It needs to be ハンジは and not ハンジの because it is the subject that performed the two actions described --- 「[仲間]{なかま}を[喰]{く}った」 and 「その[巨人]{きょじん}の[腹]{はら}をかっさいた」. 「その巨人」 refers to the 「仲間」. 「かっさいた」 = 「かっ裂いた」 = "ripped open" said in the animated tough guy language using 「かっ」, a verb prefix for that purpose. "Haiji ate his friend. He ripped open the giant's ...


6

In the 8th panel: でも、これからはドラエモンがついてるから安心しな、おじいさん。 Those 2 から are both for giving the reason for something (because)? It's a bit confusing. No, only the second 「から」 is for stating a reason. "Don't you worry because Doraemon will be with you from now on, Grandpa!" 「これから」 just means "from now on". In the 5th panel I don't quite get なんだもの at the ...


5

The translation of the first sentence sounds fine. For the second one, "destroy" may be too general for 「くだく」 and "be equivalent to" sounds a little bit different to 「…の根本{こんぽん}は」. My suggestion is something like "The essence of destroying something is shattering the atoms that compose it." (I'm not a native English speaker, the wording may be awkward...) ...


5

About the nuance of お嬢さま. The difference is visual. Someone described as お嬢様, besides being a young unmarried female, has also cultivated (or been raised to have) a sense of upper-class refinement, most immediately evident through her appearance and attitude. Perhaps in between Scarlett O'Hara and Holly Golightly? Looking closely at that フジ三太郎 comic ...


5

ばかこくでねえ is a dialectal way of saying ばかこくんじゃない, ばかをいうな 'Don't be silly.' ばか(を)こく means [馬鹿]{ばか}(なこと)を言う, 'say a stupid thing' 'be stupid'. へえる is a dialectal or collapsed way of saying [入]{はい}る. へえるはずさ, 入るはずさ literally means 'should go in', so probably 'He should go in' 'I'm sure he will go into the Pachiko shop'.


5

「いっぺん」 = 「[一回]{いっかい}」 = 「[一度]{いちど}」 = "(for) once" Now, onto 「シメる」. When you see a verb that sounds familiar but its stem part is written out in katakana, the chances are that you are seeing an informal or slangy verb. 「シメる」 is no exception. It comes from 「締める」= "to tighten", "to be strict",etc., but not 「閉める」= "to close". *Note that this occurs only ...


4

大丈夫と思います。漫画を読んだら読解力を増えて、早速適当な日本語を読めるようになる。読解力を増えることは一番大事な物です。 (probably awkward grammatically). I think it's fine. If you're reading manga, it will bring up your reading level and you'll soon be able to read proper Japanese. Bringing up your reading level is the most important thing.


4

Well, when you are learning a language, everything would be useful, even Anime, TV commercials, and also even spam emails will let you learn a lot. You just need to adjust or choose more common/polite usages when you really use it.


4

The basic meaning is the same as 渡さない. There are two differences: The focus particle は adds emphasis to the negative. In order to add the particle, the verb is split into two parts, 渡し+しない, with the particle added in between. The Western negative form せん (from せぬ) is used instead of the Eastern form しない. No, it doesn't mean "cross over a road or ...


4

ここにいる少年達はみんな君を慕って来たというが、本当ですか? There is a transitive verb 慕【した】う which means to yearn for.


4

台 in this context is a short for パチンコ台, a Pachinko machine. やった is the past tense of やる, a verb "to play" in this context. Thus the topic of the sentense is "The Machine which Joe played". ガラス is a glass panel which is placed on the front of a machine. はずしてあった is the past ~てある form of a verb 外す, to remove. Thus the main sentence is "the front glass had been ...


4

I asked two Japanese PhD students who knew the anime version. From the way it is pronounced, they understood it as "Food Fight/Battle" and both would have written it as 食撃 (like Ringil suggested in his comment). As for why the it is written as 食戟 they had two similar opinions: First, 戟 is outside of Jōyō Kanji used in daily life and therefore is ...


4

They are all actual words. まわる is 回る, to revolve. She feels her surroundings (or herself) are spinning. It can imply her thoughts go round and round (go back and forth) in her brain. ぐわんぐわん is one of the 擬態語, it is often used to describe a sense of vertigo or tinnitus (mix of ぐるんぐるん/ぐるぐる + がんがん). ほわほわ is also a 擬態語. It's similar to ふわふわ, which is light, ...


4

The person is declaring that he/she will 二度と列車や車に乗らない. もう's literal meaning is "has gotten to the state" (e.g. もう歩けない、もう食べれる), and here it indicates that the speaker has gotten to the state that he/she will never board a train or car (he/she "had enough"). The は specifies that he/she will specifically not board a train or car (while he/she might board ...


3

まわりで: Oh this is ambiguous... I think the speaker wants to say 「俺のまわりで (literally, around me)」 here, but it can be taken in two opposite ways... "behind my back" or "clinging around me". I guess the former is the likely interpretation here because it is preceded by "こそこそ人のこと調べたり", but I'm not sure. ああだこうだと言う: (((ああ+だ)+(こう+だ))と言う). To say various trivial ...


3

You have the general gist right, but the middle line is literally "I won't hand her over to anyone!" //watas-u// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-uru// ⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊⇊ //watas-i wa s-en//  (≡ //watas-i wa s-enu// ≡ //watas-i wa s-inai//) The //-en// is the same thing you find in 「ません」, it's a more literary negative form. If the grammatical explanation ...



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