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14

I have a friend (anecdotal, of course) who has lived in Japan for 11 years. He learned Japanese only 3 ways: (a) girlfriends, (b) manga & anime, and (c) male Japanese friends. His pronunciation is very natural; he's so comfortable in the dirtier parts of the language that he can bawl out a taxi driver. I've witnessed him tear apart a guy on the street ...


13

While i agree with you that there is a lot of Japanese from anime that can't be used in daily conversation, it can still be a valuable learning tool in ear training, pronunciation, culture acquisition and vocabulary acquisition. And knowing the culture goes along way towards learning how the language is used.


12

The small ぇ in 手ぇふった is a way of indicating in writing the compensatory lengthening of the vowel in a single-mora word that sometimes occurs when the following case particle を is omitted in familiar speech. This is described in The Phonology of Japanese (Labrune 2012) in section 2.7.5, 'Prosodic Lengthening'. So as Yang Muye says, it means 手をふった.


12

救われん is made of 救われる and the archaic suffix ん, which came out of む. む・ん had similar rôles to よう・おう today; that is to say, 救われん in modern style would be 救われよう or 救われるだろう. It is not related to the ん that comes out of ぬ, which is a strong or dialectal way of stating a negative. Additionally, as chocolate says in the comments, 祈り信じよ means 'Pray and believe', ...


10

In some dialects spoken in the western part of Japan, you can elongate the last vowel of the masu-form to make an imperative form: 歩きい。 (dialect) = 歩け。 Walk. 見い。 (dialect) = 見ろ。 Watch. [待ちい]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [待て]{HL}。 Wait. [食べえ]{LHL}。 (dialect) = [食べろ]{LHL}。 Eat. (From my personal experience, I feel this is mainly used in Chugoku/Shikoku ...


9

からかい上手の高木さん refers to Takagi-san as good at teasing. In this context, the からかい上手 is an adjective, which always come before the noun in Japanese, even where subordinate clauses would be used in English. If it were written the other way around, it would be talking about Takagi-san's skillful teasing (where teasing is the topic rather than Takagi-san). ...


9

年をとる means to grow old, to age. Next time try a dictionary first.


9

うぃっく It's an imitative sound of a hiccup often used to describe drunk people.


9

お人【ひと】好【よ】し usually has a negative connotation; someone who is generous to a fault, someone who doesn't know how to doubt others. 「彼はお人好しだ」 is mildly derogatory in most cases. いい人 is usually positive (「彼はいい人だ」 is not derogatory), although it may be used sarcastically depending on the context. In this sentence, the speaker rephrased お人好し as いい人 because the ...


9

The particle な indeed has both meanings: "Don't do ~" and "Do ~". From デジタル大辞泉: 1 動詞・動詞型助動詞の終止形、ラ変型活用語の連体形に付く。禁止の意を表す。「油断する―」「まだ帰る―」「かの尼君などの聞かむに、おどろおどろしく言ふ―」〈源・夕顔〉 2 《補助動詞「なさる」の命令形「なさい」の省略形》動詞・動詞型助動詞の連用形に付く。命令の意を表す。「早く行き―」「好きなようにやり―」 To distinguish, な means "don't" when it follows the dictionary-form, and "do" when it follows the masu-form. ...


8

ばっきゃろ is the change way of saying of 馬鹿{ばか}野郎{やろう}. It means same as 馬鹿野郎. I think there isn't hidden meaning for the intention of changing the 「わなわな」 into katakana but I guess the writer may accent the sentence by using katakana because it is all written in hiragana except ワナワナ.


7

Your first translation, "It could have become something better." is very good translation. Literally, reading just one phrase ならなかった, it means "did not become". (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかった。 (It didn't become more cheaper.) In other cases - connected with ものか(もんか) for example - the meaning of ならなかった will change. (これは)もっと[安]{やす}くならなかったものか。 (This ...


7

1) This kind of repeated verbs express the action that happened repeatedly, or for a long time. The effect is not very different from how English speakers say "He ran and ran" and such. In addition, this 流れ流れた has 7 morae, and you can see this forms a good 七五調 rhythm like waka. 流れ流れた(7) - ドヤ街で(5) - へんなおやじに(7) - つきまとわれて(7) ... 2) 御用! (or 御用だ!) is a ...


7

"のたのたする" is a colloquial expression of "[無為]{むい}に過ごす / [怠惰]{たいだ}に過ごす" meaning "to idle one's time away" as well as "のらくらする." のたのた、のらくら、のろのろ, all are a sort of onomatopoeic expression depicting laziness, inactiveness and slowness. We use ”のたのた” and "のたのたする" in such a way as: この忙しい時にのたのたしてるんじゃねえよ - Don't be idle in such a busy time. ...


7

There is another subsidiary verb, おる, in its imperative form. 黙っておる can be contracted to 黙っとる (see this chart). おる is mainly used to make a humble expression, but it's also used as an arrogant, dialectal or a bit old-fashioned version of simple いる. お・る〔をる〕【▽居る】 ㋑「いる」の古風な、または尊大な言い方。また、「いる」に比べて方言的な響きを帯びる。「君はそこに―・ったのか」「都会にはセミも―・らんようになった」 So it just ...


7

The other answers are mainly correct, but they leave out the part that this is usage of 黙っとる or 黙っとれ are still common in certain dialects, mainly western Japan. Some say the dividing line is somewhere between Shizuoka prefecture and Aichi prefecture. Once you go west of Aichi prefecture you hear the とる form a lot, like in phrases as 知っとる (知っている) or やっとる (...


6

The なはった is the past tense form of なはる, which is the Kansai version of honorific なさる. So [起]{お}きなはった would be like 起きなさった in standard Japanese. そら見い いよいよおきなはったあ ≂ そら見ろ、いよいよ(≂とうとう)起きなさった。(≂ 起きられた / 起きてしまわれた) Is the 「はったあ」 the past form of 「はる」 or 'to do' in Kansai dialect? The meaning is the same, just your example uses なはった/なはる. Actually we ...


5

ばかこくでねえ is a dialectal way of saying ばかこくんじゃない, ばかをいうな 'Don't be silly.' ばか(を)こく means [馬鹿]{ばか}(なこと)を言う, 'say a stupid thing' 'be stupid'. へえる is a dialectal or collapsed way of saying [入]{はい}る. へえるはずさ, 入るはずさ literally means 'should go in', so probably 'He should go in' 'I'm sure he will go into the Pachiko shop'.



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