New answers tagged

4

I can definitely say I have seen a trend among people with 漢字圏 backgrounds to avoid カタカナ loanwords in favor of 漢字, where there is an equivalent (regardless of how unnatural it might sound). In those cases, the subjects would mostly be native in Chinese, which is fairly far removed from the European (Germanic and Latin) words that 外来語 generally hails from. ...


2

(Seems very opinion-based to me, but nevertheless) I'm not so sure it's easier for native English speakers for different reasons : Some 外来語 don't come from English : アルバイト (from "Arbeit" in german), ズボン (from "Jupon" in french), コップ (from "Copo" in Portuguese or "Kop" in Dutch, sources diverge) etc... Some words can be confusing for a native English ...


1

the official translation of the map app on iOS is マップ, which leads me to think it's only used to denote a specific app whose NAME is マップ; but indeed, when referring to an actual map, and not the app that bares such name, they use 地図.


7

The far more versatile choice is 「[地図]{ちず}」; No question about it. I would say that an average native speaker would learn to use 「マップ」 a good 10 years after learning to use 「ちず」 as a toddler. In school, the word used is 「地図」 virtually 100% of the time and that is both in and outside of geography classes. In daily life, when you draw a simple map to show ...


-1

Katakana is mainly used in imported words and onomatopoetic words. The word "マップ" is a imported word so it is written katakana. I think the basic difference in usage is 地図 is mainly used in Japan and マップ is mainly used for foreign people because 地図 is Japanese and マップ is the reading and writing in Japanese for the English word "map". In addition, we eager ...



Top 50 recent answers are included