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7

The former method is 命数法【めいすうほう】, and the latter is 位【くらい】取【ど】り記数法【きすうほう】, although they're not known to most people. See this, this, or this book. Wikipedia says that, in English, 10000 is written as 10000 in 記数法 and as ten thousand in 命数法. I personally knew 位取り記数法, but I haven't recognized 命数法 as the opposing idea of 記数法. Either way, most people ...


4

I am not aware of any such analysis that looks at the full breadth of Japanese character readings. Some background first. Background detail Kanji have been used very flexibly, both historically and currently, with examples such as the historical 木乃伊【みいら】, where the spelling comes from Chinese and the reading comes from Portuguese mirra or Dutch mirre ...


4

I put that citation into the Wikipedia link. It came from a grammar book in Japanese published by Hitsuji Shobou. It lists Japanese cases, giving the particle that marks the case (or showing a zero crossed through for the nominative case), gives some Japanese names for the cases, and gives the English name for the cases. I think some confusion regarding the ...


3

There are many usages, but 「にかかわらず」 and 「にもかかわらず」are different. (You can't replace them) When you want to insist you won't care about something: 何か(A) にかかわらず 何か(B) をする。 Without caring about something(A), do something(B). Without worrying about something(A), do something(B). It's similar to: 何か に拘らず 何か をする。 何か を気にせず 何か をする。 何か を問わず 何か をする。 何か を意識せず 何か をする。 ...


2

Certainly at some point Japanese fishermen shared drinks/conversation with Tamil speakers somewhere along the coast of Malaysia & perhaps brought back some colorful new vocabulary (or spouses) ... but that's very different from a linguistic/etymological link on a grand scale. As you say, Tamil (like many societies) has its proponents who claim it's the ...


1

According to this answer, there are 335 音読み in modern use. Assuming that statistic is true, the probability of randomly guessing and getting it right is 1/335. But the odds improve based on other things about the kanji. There are certain phonetic components will suggest a certain reading. For example, you can bet a kanji with the component 寺 in it will be ...


1

I'm saying this not as a specialist but based on my studies of bungo (literary Japanese) and as someone who lived in Kansai for 4 years, but as far as I know there is nothing particularly Kansai-ben-ish about the concept of keigo in itself. What you've heard may have to do with particular forms that keigo uses nowadays, by judging from my own exposure to ...



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