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6

Please note that kana is not a true syllabic script anymore. The reason for this is due to /n/. For example, take the word /sinbun/ "newspaper". If you break it into its syllables, it is sin.bun. While accents are determined by syllables in some dialects, kana--as well as Japanese speakers--segment this as si.n.bu.n. The appropriate term for this mora. ...


6

In about 2000 years ago, people in Japan were still using clay vessels and had no characters at all, while China had developed a large civilization and their own writing system, kanji. In those days, Japanese and Chinese used completely different languages, with completely different vocabulary, syllables, and grammar. In around the 1st to 4th century, kanji ...


4

I put that citation into the Wikipedia link. It came from a grammar book in Japanese published by Hitsuji Shobou. It lists Japanese cases, giving the particle that marks the case (or showing a zero crossed through for the nominative case), gives some Japanese names for the cases, and gives the English name for the cases. I think some confusion regarding the ...


4

Some language families (such as Chinese and Athabaskan) have visible origins for their tones - you can't reconstruct tone back to the shared proto-language, but you can reconstruct other features that later turned into tone. Other language families (such as Bantu and Oto-Manguean) have no visible origins for their tones - you can reconstruct tone back to ...


3

To my understanding as a native speaker, in all of the three examples, sentence (1) is written from the author's perspective, and sentence (2) is written from the perspective of a character in the story. The switching of the perspectives is in fact, in these examples, is signalled by the change of the tenses. The sentences in Example 24 could be written in ...


3

You've got two distinct questions here, I'll answer them in turn. Japanese wasn't really 'influenced' by any other syllabic phonetic writing systems; instead, it turns out a syllabary is the most natural kind of phonetic writing system to create out of nothing (or out of a semantically-based system like Chinese). Of the various examples we have of people ...


2

There are many usages, but 「にかかわらず」 and 「にもかかわらず」are different. (You can't replace them) When you want to insist you won't care about something: 何か(A) にかかわらず 何か(B) をする。 Without caring about something(A), do something(B). Without worrying about something(A), do something(B). It's similar to: 何か に拘らず 何か をする。 何か を気にせず 何か をする。 何か を問わず 何か をする。 何か を意識せず 何か をする。 ...


1

I'm saying this not as a specialist but based on my studies of bungo (literary Japanese) and as someone who lived in Kansai for 4 years, but as far as I know there is nothing particularly Kansai-ben-ish about the concept of keigo in itself. What you've heard may have to do with particular forms that keigo uses nowadays, by judging from my own exposure to ...


1

Certainly at some point Japanese fishermen shared drinks/conversation with Tamil speakers somewhere along the coast of Malaysia & perhaps brought back some colorful new vocabulary (or spouses) ... but that's very different from a linguistic/etymological link on a grand scale. As you say, Tamil (like many societies) has its proponents who claim it's the ...


1

“を” is used as “from” only when used with a verb meaning “get out”. Usually “から” is used for “from”. Where both can be used, the meanings are different. ⚪︎ 家{いえ}を出{で}る Get out of home to go somewhere (eg. shopping). ⚪︎ 家から出る Get out of house (not necessarily to go somewhere; eg. to clean your garden). ⚪︎ バスを降りる Get off the bus because you ...


1

Use of the unmarked case is categorized into three. When particle は・が・を (and に when the verb is 行く or 来る) are simply omitted. When the unmarked case is the most natural (the least nuanced) choice. e.g. ビール飲みますか? いちご好きですか? When it's grammatically required. e.g. あっ、納豆が腐ってる! → あっ、この納豆くさってる!


1

The citation from Wikipedia supplied by the OP strikes me as nonsense. If the presence of が should mark agentive case, why does it appear in case distributions that we never associate with agency? 1. 庭に木がある。          'There is a tree in the garden.' 2. 僕にはお金がない。        'I don't have money.' 3. ボールが壁にあたったとき...   'when the ball hit the wall'  ...



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