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7

The former method is 命数法【めいすうほう】, and the latter is 位【くらい】取【ど】り記数法【きすうほう】, although they're not known to most people. See this, this, or this book. Wikipedia says that, in English, 10000 is written as 10000 in 記数法 and as ten thousand in 命数法. I personally knew 位取り記数法, but I haven't recognized 命数法 as the opposing idea of 記数法. Either way, most people (...


7

I think you have a couple choices. For "fluent": ペラペラ。 This is a slightly colloquial word (due to being an onomatopoeia sounding like quick speech), which can mean "fluent", both in the sense of (a) speaking uninterruptedly, and by extension, (b) being skilled in the language. This might be the most common word you hear when describing someone as "fluent" ...


5

Not sure I should answer this, but it is related to Japanese after all, so I'll go ahead. So, by definition - no. 外食 is a lexeme that consists of more than one stem. That alone is enough to say that it cannot be a morpheme. To elaborate a bit more, both 外 and 食 are actually unbound morphemes (they appear not only as part of larger words), meaning that it's ...


4

I am not aware of any such analysis that looks at the full breadth of Japanese character readings. Some background first. Background detail Kanji have been used very flexibly, both historically and currently, with examples such as the historical 木乃伊【みいら】, where the spelling comes from Chinese and the reading comes from Portuguese mirra or Dutch mirre ("...


4

I put that citation into the Wikipedia link. It came from a grammar book in Japanese published by Hitsuji Shobou. It lists Japanese cases, giving the particle that marks the case (or showing a zero crossed through for the nominative case), gives some Japanese names for the cases, and gives the English name for the cases. I think some confusion regarding the ...


3

‘Fluent’ is translated as 流暢な and 淀みない as adjectives, 流暢に、淀みなく as adverbs, and ペラペラ and すらすら as onomatopoeias, like 彼は英語をペラペラ(流暢に)話す。 The word ‘native speaker’ passes as “ネイティヴ・スピーカー” in Japanese own pronunciation. It can be rephrased as ”外(国)人並み,” which is a very popular phrase. Most Japanese would roll their eyes if they hear "ボゴワシャ," unless you show it ...


1

I'm saying this not as a specialist but based on my studies of bungo (literary Japanese) and as someone who lived in Kansai for 4 years, but as far as I know there is nothing particularly Kansai-ben-ish about the concept of keigo in itself. What you've heard may have to do with particular forms that keigo uses nowadays, by judging from my own exposure to ...


1

According to this answer, there are 335 音読み in modern use. Assuming that statistic is true, the probability of randomly guessing and getting it right is 1/335. But the odds improve based on other things about the kanji. There are certain phonetic components will suggest a certain reading. For example, you can bet a kanji with the component 寺 in it will be ...



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