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21

Because the pronunciation was lost. "Wi" and "we" are still in some dialects, but standard Japanese does not have those sounds. These characters were just spelling. Similarly in English, we pronounce "through" as "thru" because the "gh" sound is long gone. After World War II there was a massive language overhaul, and they changed/standardized spelling and ...


16

Why is the Japanese government considering adding kanji such as “cancer” to the jinmeiyō kanji? I do not think that the government is trying to add these kanji to the set of jinmeiyō kanji. I think that some people are confused by the unclear description in Wikipedia. At least I was confused at first. So probably it is useful to clarify it. Article ...


12

I do not know any name for rewriting of kanji (because of a kanji reform) using a similar-looking kanji. I am not sure if 濠洲 was replaced by 豪州 because they look similar. I guess that the biggest factor that contributed to this rewriting was they can be read in the same way. Because 濠洲 is ateji, the most important property of the kanji 濠 must be its ...


9

文化庁 also publish guidelines on okurigana, the writing of gairaigo, and the use of romaji. Those can be seen here. Other documents here include guidelines on the use of punctuation, iteration marks, etc. There is also 国立国語研究所. Although they're researchers not regulators, they have produced documents on how to reword difficult-to-understand gairaigo using ...


3

Well the government can and does regulate the words that and characters that can be used in both official documents, government signage and legal names. They also set the minimum education standards for Japanese language. So kids have to learn kanji and learn it in a specific form. While they can't go and take your book of out circulation or take down your ...


2

As it turns out, I actually researched this phenomenon the other day while doing some reading up on 旧字体【きゅうじたい】. As it turns out, what you're referring to are 書換字【かきかえじ】. Essentially, with the promogulation of the 当用漢字【とうようかんじ】 in 1946, the Japanese government decided to try to encourage some additional, more informal simplifications to bring vocabulary ...



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