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36

In Old Japanese (probably before 800 BC), the pronunciation of 「は」 (and indeed the entire ハ行) was PA, but it later changed to FA (more accurately, [ɸa], with a bilabial fricative), and this was the common pronunciation at least up to the 16th century (we know this since early Portuguese transliteration of Japanese words use the letter F where we would use H ...


15

I think this question is relevant: What do you mean, "In Japanese there are no words for "I’m suffering""? Also a little googling leads to a quote where this is clearly being used metaphorically by the speaker (presuming this is even an accurate quote/translation and not made up): Captain Sasaki of the Yokahama Guards: "There is no ...


13

If I talk about the letters ゐ/ヰ and ゑ/ヱ, I would call them ワ行の「ゐ」 (pronounced as わぎょうのい) and ワ行の「ゑ」 (わぎょうのえ), or explain the letters in some way (昔の仮名の「ゐ」 and so on). I may or may not pronounce them as ウィ and ウェ, but I will probably try to avoid relying solely on pronunciation. The same also applies to を/ヲ. As David M. R. writes, 和文通話表 (the Japanese ...


10

降伏 (こうふく) is borrowed from Classical Chinese and probably has many centuries of history. After all, in the Sengoku period there were probably many, many surrenders of lords to other lords.


8

Update: I originally said these characters were obliterated from the language. I was wrong about that, as shown in the accompanying picture. As you can see in the picture above, the character does pop up now and again. I've probably passed by this place in Shinjuku countless times, but never took notice of it until recently when this question had the ...


7

Since there is no way to unambiguously pronounce these letters in modern Japanese, as Dave M G explains in his answer, I'd name them with: わうぃうぅうぇうぉ の うぃ/うぇ 「ヰタ・セクスアリス」[1] のヰ (いたせくすありす の い / うぃたせくすありす の うぃ) ニッカウヰスキー [2] のヰ (にっかうぃすきーの い/うぃ) ヱビスビール [3] のヱ (えびすびーる の え / いぇびすびーる の いぇ[4]) Incidentally, I would name "を" as "難しい方の「を」", or "わをんの「を」". And ...


5

Although as Dave M G already explained these characters do not have an independent pronounciation anymore, when spelling something through a telephone, they can be explained as "かぎのあるヱ" and "ゐどのヰ". (Source: Wikipedia ゑ and Wikipedia ゐ) You can also refer to them by their position in one of the ordering systems of the Japanese syllables. (ゑ is 第46位 in the ...


3

The sound 「わ」 used to be written は in old kana usage in some cases. Old kana usage was much more irregular than it is nowadays. The old way of writing has kind of stuck in some words. It's the same thing with the readings for the particles へ and を too - the modern sound 「え」 used to be written as へ in some cases and 「お」 as を. Of course, pronunciation varies ...


3

八百長 (やおちょう) is one word, if you extract first two "八百", it will become "はっぴゃく" (meaning - 800) there is no relation between those two. Regarding the word "八百長" timeline, Wikipedia, and Gogen guide, it started to be used in the Meiji Era (1868–1912).



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