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8

写真をお届け! I think it's short for 写真をお届けします! or 写真をお届けいたします! "We will deliver a photo/photos to you!" お届けする is the humble form (謙譲語) of 届ける. Examples: ~をご報告 / ご案内 / ご連絡 / ご紹介(いた)します!--> ~をご報告!/ご案内!/ご連絡!/ご紹介! キャンペーン情報をお知らせ(いた)します!--> キャンペーン情報をお知らせ!


7

時間がなかったからパーティーに行きませんでした。 時間がありませんでしたからパーティーに行きませんでした。 While the second one is relatively a bit politer than the first, neither of these are very casual nor polite. If you said these directly to the host of the party, the host would probably feel offended. If you said these to your close friend, he/she would feel that the "~でした" part is ...


7

Both sentences have minor issues even though they may be considered good in Japanese as a foreign language. At least, both are grammatical. 「から」 actually sounds more casual/informal than many J-learners seem to think. That is the impression that I get from speaking to them. The more formal words with the same meaning would be 「ので」 and 「ため/ために」. With ...


6

It is difficult to talk about the phrase 「ごめんなさいませ」 mostly because it is not in wide use (that is unless there actually exists an area that I am unaware of where it is often said). I have probably heard it 2-3 times in my life, but that means only once every 10 years or so. I feel like it has (almost) always been an adult woman who I have heard say it. ...


5

さようなら is used mainly by school children, but adults use this less commonly in everyday conversations. Here's the list of possible expressions: お疲【つか】れ様【さま】です : Typically used after work. This is only polite enough to say goodbye to your colleagues. Don't say this to important external guests. (お先【さき】に)失礼【しつれい】します: Typically used when leaving (and entering) ...


4

This is called 「ウ[音便]{おんびん}」 and it is one type of the 「音便 (euphonic sound changes)」 that took place around Heian period. 「ウ音便」, in the simplest terms possible, is the dropping of the "k" consonant from the [連用形]{れんようけい} of i-adjectives. The 連用形 of 「うれしい」 is 「うれしく」. Drop the "k" from 「うれしく」 and you have 「うれしう」. To make 「うれしう」 even easier to say, you ...


4

ご都合 is an honorific expression, so don't use ご都合 if it refers to the 都合 of yourself. よろしいです sounds like you were higher than the guest. ("よろしいでしょうか" is OK, though) My suggestion: 12月5日(金)13時以降であれば差し支えありません。 12月5日(金)13時以降にお越しいただければ問題ありません。 12月5日(金)13時以降であれば、こちらの都合は大丈夫です。(maybe too verbose)


4

You can always say 失礼します say goodbye or to excuse yourself (lit. "I'm being rude (by leaving))". This is probably the most common. There is also 失敬します, but I've heard this is rather old-man-ish and haven't heard anyone use in normal conversation.


2

I feel the あってねえ/なんだよな part reflects the 徳田's true attitude toward 佃. Unless 徳田 and 佃 are close friends, 徳田 is speaking in a disrespectful manner as a business setting. He is being highly dominating, knowing his company is stronger. わざわざお越しいただいた/お伝えしよう is used here to show 佃 a "respect", of course. 徳田 intentionally used these minimal 敬語 because he knew he ...


1

I'm saying this not as a specialist but based on my studies of bungo (literary Japanese) and as someone who lived in Kansai for 4 years, but as far as I know there is nothing particularly Kansai-ben-ish about the concept of keigo in itself. What you've heard may have to do with particular forms that keigo uses nowadays, by judging from my own exposure to ...


1

I think 僕 is not very respectful (to the listener). It's not exactly rude (you can use it with です・ます, after all) but it's a little relaxed. So, if you are using 尊敬語 or 謙譲語 to show respect to the listener, then I think 僕 does not fit (normally you'd be using 私{わたくし} or some more relevant term like 弊社). However, if you're using 尊敬語 to show respect to some ...


1

お(連用形)なさい sounds more forceful and old-fashioned than お(連用形)ください and you can't use お(連用形)なさい in general to social superiors while you can do the latter. As for ~ませ, an employee in a shop is likely to use it to the customer.


1

It seems to be closest to 《接続助詞「に」+係助詞「も」》, using 大辞泉's second meaning for も as a 係助詞: ② 他にも類似の事物が存在することを言外にほのめかす形で,ある事物を提示する。 To apply this definition here, I would say the も is emphasizing the otherness of His Majesty - intimating that it might not be the idea the speaker would have, but His Majesty has his own ideas.



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