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Here, パー means "completely gone" or "entirely wasted", often with the nuance that the thing that is completely gone is something that you worked hard to get. デジタル大辞泉 offers the following definition: 2 持っていた金品がすっかりなくなること。それまで苦労したことが全くむだになること。また、そのさま。 There is also a definition in EDICT, but you have to search for ぱあ or パア in order for it to show up, ...


6

This depends on the type of the words. As for easy and common words, such as 桜, 犬, 蚊, they are usually written in kanji. These are written in katakana only in biological contexts. 常用漢字表 generally tells us what is considered easy and standard in modern Japanese. If you wrote "東京はサクラがきれいです" or "イヌを飼いたいと思う", that would look unnatural. Relatively difficult ...


2

If explained within the framework of Tinbergen's four questions: (don't take it much seriously) The proximate explanation is, because it's a convention in the biological society. In academic field, every creature's name is written in katakana when it refers to a equivalent of a scientific name. It once was even required by law (though it didn't state ...


1

I think it has more to do with style. Legibility - There are times where it is easier to read or glance at when written in hiragana/katakana. Kanji difficulty - For example, 豌豆{えんどう} is a very difficult kanji to begin with. Simplifying to hiragana/katakana would make it easier to understand. Aesthetics - Perhaps it lends itself better to the presentation ...


1

Usually start by hiragana, then katakana. With this you can learn kanji (reading on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ}, kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ}). When you get a kanji dictionary you can notice different ways to read the same kanji: on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ} usually with reading in katakana kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ} usually with reading in hiragana Here have an example of ...



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