New answers tagged

3

One Piece is set in a fictional world, but the setting is clearly not Japan. Actually, apart from Zoro's swords I can't remember anything that is related to Japan. In this world 記録指針{きろくししん} sounds like a poor translation of some "original" word; ログポーズ sounds much more authentic, but you have no idea what it means (not even if you figure out the English ...


5

Some writers like to do it because it adds meaning to what may otherwise be incoherent sounds. This works even for me, a native English speaker: I've never read any One Piece, so I have no idea what "Log Pose" or "Poneglyph" mean. But if their names are written as kanji with furigana applied, I can take a guess at what kind of thing they are. It works even ...


1

As a minor addendum to other answers, there is another problem with writing in kana only: reading speed. For someone who has knowledge of the relevant kanji, reading the kanji version isn't just a way around homophones and ambiguity, it is actually faster. The reading speed difference gets bigger as your reader's level goes up and the more you stick to '...


0

Yes, all Kanji characters can be replaced by hiragana, by katakana, and by a mixture of them. However, as other answers show, two sentences with Kanji may map to the same single sequence of hiragana or of katanaka. Such a sequence is understandable, but may be understood as multiple meanings. For example, in old days (probably around early 20th century), ...


14

The columns (or rows) that have the same initial consonant are labeled as the first item in that column (consonant + a) followed by [行]{ぎょう}. Examples of such are あ行, か行, さ行, た行, etc. The rows (or columns) that have the same vowel sound are labeled with that vowel in hiragana (あ, い, う, え, or お) followed by [段]{だん}. Thus, the five rows are labeled as あ段, い段, ...


5

I agree with Earthliŋ for the most part. Though I have never heard of Japanese students being taught and official "Katakana-ized" version of the English alphabet. Generally they seem to be taught to imitate native pronunciation as closely as possible. I use and hear the following variations regularly: Disclaimer: I live in Kansai. A - エイ D - ディー or デー (...


14

I share your experience. Sticking straight to the katakana pronunciation below, I have never had the problem of someone not understanding me any more. I believe this is the pronunciation currently taught in Japanese schools. A: エー【HL】 B: ビー【HL】 C: シー【HL】 D: ディー【HHL】 E: イー【HL】 F: エフ【HL】 G: ジー【HL】 H: エイチ【HLL】 I: アイ【HL】 J: ジェー【HHL】 K: ケー【HL】 L: エル【HL】 M: エム【HL】...


2

I think the majority of these are legible with no problem. But a good number of them might be difficult to work out. I think you would be safe using Hiragana with spaces, which has plenty of precedent for games. Or, you could use only the legible Kanji and replace the others with Hiragana and Katakana. Here's the same sentence with a few options: "Push ...


5

TLDR: Use at least a 9px font unless you want negative reviews. This is 美咲フォント, isn't it? Actually, it's indeed 7px per glyph plus 1px padding :) I know this font, but didn't mention it in my previous answer, because I thought you will never need this in smartphone games with LCDs with >200 dpi. 8px (7px + 1px) kanji fonts are used in some real games on ...


1

By themselves, most kanji (the glyphs) at the bottom are hard too recognize. As part of a sentence wuth some context, you can read it, but it definitely does not look nice at. I'd say 8 pixel is a bit too low. However, I recently did some hobby programming as well and found this font: PixelMPlus It's freely available and a true type font without any ...


5

Thinking of i18n as an afterthought is always a nightmare :) Well, the short answer is "yes, you can", but you need a very good reason to do so. Almost all modern games use both hiragana/katakana and kanji, unless the game is clearly targeted at kindergartners. In general, ordinary Japanese sentences can express the same thing in much smaller number of ...


1

Absolutely. In fact, many (most?) old Japanese games are like that (because storing all the necessary kanji would take too much space I assume, and maybe they were concerned about the readability just like you), e.g. Phantasy Star: I don't know if it's a common practice in modern games though. Googling スマホゲーム (smartphone game) pictures I see plenty of ...


5

The name of 「キヤノン」 was the registered brand name of the first camera model developed by 精機工学研究所 - Seiki Optical Technique Laboratory, which was later developed into today’s Canon Inc. The company was founded by Goro Yoshida and his brother in law in 1933. They named their first camera they developed as “Kwannon” after one of the most popular Buddhist ...


6

Searching for キヤノン 由来 one quickly finds the relevant official page for the origin of the name Canon. It seems that the company name itself was derived from the English word "canon": Canonの語源には、「正典」「規範」「標準」という意味があります。 It was also a welcome coincidence that the pronunciation of キヤノン was close to 観音=カンノン (Kannon, Kwannon, Avalokiteśvara): また「キヤノン」...


2

The Canon name brand comes from 観音, Kannon, or in Sanskrit Avalokiteshvara. The Buddhist bodhisattva "Hears the cries of the world." But there is also a description of her/him have a thousand hands with an eye on the palm of each hand observing the world. It's kind of a beautiful image for a camera name since the camera sees all.


1

レアメタル is indeed "rare metal" (or rare earth), and どうたら/どうたらこうたら is like "blah-blah", "such-and-such", "you-know-what". It's used in place of an obvious and/or unimportant part. The following questions are related. What does うんたらかんたら mean? The phrase うんやらかんやら? So "レアメタルがどうたら" means "rare metals are blah blah blah" And in case you didn't know, phones ...



Top 50 recent answers are included