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10

うち is mostly used by girls to refer to themselves, but this usage is only common in Kansai-ben and perhaps other regional dialects as well, and it is generally not considered to be part of standard Japanese. See http://detail.chiebukuro.yahoo.co.jp/qa/question_detail/q148192694 So to answer your question, yes if a guy says うち, he is probably most likely ...


8

わ can also have a non-feminine meaning of: 軽{かる}い詠嘆{えいたん}や驚{おどろ}きなどの気持{きも}ちを表{あらわ}す。 - Expresses mild feelings of admiration, surprise, etc. So the idea here is to express that lovely "oh!" feeling you get when your ears pop, as you can see by his smile. I can't honestly say how prevalent this is, or if you ought to use it.


7

Never seen よーちぇん before but it must be a lazy pronunciation of 幼稚園{ようちえん} So: "I haven't forgotten it since kindergarten" And no context in the question but おらん will most likely be the negative of おる, yes.


7

Edit. (Thanks to naruto for pointing out the correct translation.) 大丈夫!バンパー外すよりまし!笑 No problem! Better than missing the bumper! lol よりまし is より ("than") + まし ("better"). I don't quite know why, but you seem to get the opposite meaning.


7

There's a couple of similar expressions with overlapping meanings here, so I'll elaborate on @sawa's answer to add some color. しょーむない is probably a cute slangy way to say しょうもない, which is a common contraction of しようもない, which means "silly" or "useless". This is mainly used in western dialects, and the standard would be しようがない (often contracted to しょうがない) or ...


7

This actually most likely Oosaka-ben's variation of 「や」as「よ」, becoming something like: なんか買ってくれよ! The usage is explained in more detail here: http://www.weblio.jp/content/%E3%82%84?dictCode=OSAKA (Japanese) EDIT The original quote from the just in case site downtime happens: ...


7

I'm not sure due to lack of context, but there's a high likelihood that it's in Kansai-ben/Kansai dialect. What's written is Kansai-ben negation. The Hyojungo/standard version would be あなたも なかなか やるじゃないの〜 Here are some links that should be helpful: List of Hyojungo to Osaka-ben suffix conversions. Please refer to the 8th listing. (in Japanese) ...


6

There are some significant differences between Kansai-ben and what you see in textbooks, I'm not sure where you would get the idea that the only difference was in pitch emphasis. There are some very significant pitch-differences, but that's not the only change. (Personally, I felt the pitch changes were much easier to notice in Kyoto, but that might have ...


6

やるやないの This is a Japanese dialect used mainly the Kansai region (Hyogo, Osaka, etc.). Perhaps you have misunderstood which words are being used in the sentence: ≠ 「やる」 + 「やらない」 ≒ 「やるじゃない(の)」


5

One is feminine and the other is just very emphatic. Both are particles so both can be used in the same context. The wa used by males is likely to be used with less formal language, but only because of the common language of its users, not any grammatical constraint.


5

I believe so. I can't find an explicit affirmation (I provided sources which I've read before, but I could have forgotten or missed such a statement), but for present tense adjectives in the Kyoto-Osaka dialect, it seems the accent falls on the antepenultimate mora (third to last) for trimoraic words or longer, otherwise it falls on the penultimate mora for ...


5

In Kansai-ben ですよ can, according to Ikue Shingu's Kansai Grammar Index, become どすえ どっせ だっせ でっせ but I would consider it as raw Kansai-ben. You almost never hear it (I never did) and it can stay as ですよ. Kansai-ben is also the intonation, choice of words and in other parts of the sentence than the end copula. だよ on the other hand becomes in the most ...


5

For someone who has studied standard Japanese, how hard is it to learn Kansai dialect? Many people who spent years studying a language something not being able to learn anything. Your question's logic is not well formed. Is there a lot to learn, or not much? Re-learn bits of grammar, vocabulary, and change completely your intonation. What are ...


4

What I see often is that Kyoto-ben has this emphasis expression "~え" sentence ending, like "ええお天気どすえ", "いきまっせ!" (ますえ contracted to まっせ), while Osaka-ben will use "~で" sentence ending, like "そないあほなことすると怪我するで。気をつけなあかんで。". Osaka is more likely to use わ ending. Also, some verbs like 来ない are pronounced differently: Kyoto is きいへん while Osaka is けえへん (or was it ...


4

In Kansaiben, や replaces だ and よ


4

The different pitch accent patterns is easily the most noticeable phonetic difference when you look at the Kansaiben dialects (and it's important to mention that this is a group of dialects rather than a single dialect with no internal regional variation), so it's easy to conclude that this is the only real different in pronunciation between standard ...


4

As you have already picked up on, the intonation (change in pitch) of words is vastly different. A common example is the pronunciation of the word 日本. Osaka: Starts high, and pitch lowers にほん【HLL】 Standard: Starts low, and pitch raises and then lowers にほん【LHL】 However this is not the only difference between Kansai-ben and Standard ...


4

I'm a Japanese from Niigata Prefecture, but I've came across a lot of people from Kansai. 「疲れまんねん」is just a way of saying「疲れますねん」. 「ねん」is almost added to any Kansaiben phrase. Such as: 「違います」is「ちゃうねん」in Kansaiben. 「なんですか?」is「なんやねん?」in Kansaiben. Sometimes it is 'embedded' inside phrases. 「そうとは違います」is「そうとちゃうねんな」in Kansaiben. 「ねん」is ...


3

There are four main parts to consider: な (the form of the copula before のだ) のだ (which has a wide range of uses and is highly context-dependent) よ (an interactional particle) さ (another interactional particle) The last three are all highly context dependent. But the character ends all of their sentences with them, right? They just pile them all on with ...


3

You have already received several answers. Rather than repeat them, let me give you the resources so that you can answer this and similar questions on your own. Look for a book titled 『大阪ことば辞典』 by 牧村史陽 (Makimura Shiyō) and published by Kōdansha, 1984. The ISBN is 4-06-158658-0. Below are a few short excerpts. (page 376) セヤ: ...


3

According to a dictionary, この語の成立については未詳。一説に「ぬあった」の転かともいう source


2

'Is there a lot to learn?' is a pretty subjective question. You can learn as much or as little as you like, and different Kansai folks speak different levels of the dialect. My wife is from Kansai, so I picked it up from her and her family. I think that that would be the best way to go - find someone from Kansai and learn from them. Books are available, but ...


2

Apart from the fact that particles and verb/adjective endings differ, and the fact that vocabulary and usage also often differ -- both of which are not that hard to acquire and lots of information can be found online -- the single most difficult part will be to get the pitch accent right. It's one thing to have an accent in a Standard language, something ...



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