Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

We don't have specific words for kanji or radical reduplication, bacause it's merely coincidence, or a side effect happens when we put related or the same words together. As for repeating the same words, we call it 畳語. If a word that written in a single kanji is repeated, it appears as if the kanji is repeated. But if you try with other words, you'll get ...


2

It's 畳語(じょうご) / reduplication, though it's not limited to kanji.


3

No, you definitely don't need to know nanori readings for the JLPT. Honestly, you can read a lot of basic things pretty well without knowing very many nanori readings. Why? Well, suppose you see this (derived from Japanese Wikipedia): 安倍 晋三は、日本の政治家。自由民主党所属の衆議院議員(8期)、内閣総理大臣(第90・96・97代)、自由民主党総裁(第21・25代)。 You may have no idea how to pronounce 安倍晋三, but ...


6

「田中家」 is pronounced as 「たなかけ (Tanaka-ke)」. Usually, this word is used to refer to a family whose last names are 田中 or a house where a 田中 family live in. (ref. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/65854/m0u/) While 「田中家 (Tanaka-ke)」 sounds formally, 「田中ん家 (Tanaka-n-chi)」 sounds informally and seems to refer a family or a house of a speakers friend. A kanji ...


8

Despite the question seems to have reached its own solution, I'd like to make a new answer, for I find the existing explanations would not lead to a correct understanding on this topic. Each of these words has their own meaning, which usually cannot be directly translated to English affixes like "non-", "in-", "un-", or "-less", so I'm going to explain ...


6

Since "youthful immortal" is not a common reading for the name "Midori," if you have the opportunity to ask your parents their intended kanji, that would be the easiest route. The main kanji for Midori is 緑 (meaning greenery, or the color green). There are a few obsolete kanji variations on it that hold the same meaning. Another possible combination that ...


4

I guess Midori is 緑. 緑 (green) suggests plants with green leaves. 新緑 (fresh green in spring) -> Youthful 常緑樹 (evergreen plant) -> Immotal


5

More precisely, they are older forms ([旧字体]{きゅうじたい}) of kanji, rather than variants. Japanese kanji went through an artificial simplification conducted by the government in 1950s. Now old forms are no longer in use, except occasionally in proper nouns they could be used for the purpose of kind of characterizing or "flavoring" the names. Most people can ...


2

でも[抱]{だき}しめ[続]{つづ}けると [温]{あたたか}くなるんだ I think it's something along the lines of "But if you keep holding (each other?), you'll be warm." (I would normally write these as [抱]{だ}きしめ(る) and [温]{あたた}か(い), by the way.) Even if I know the kanji themselves I have a hard time recognizing them when it's handwritten... I often have a hard time ...


8

I'm pretty sure Mariko is [真]{ma}[理]{ri}[子]{ko} ([真理]{shinri}=truth, 子=child). Emiko is probably [恵]{e}[美]{mi}[子]{ko} (恵=blessing, grace, etc. 美=beauty). As for Midori, I have no idea. We have [緑]{midori}, [美]{mi}[登]{do}[里]{ri}, [翠]{midori} etc., but none of them would mean "Youthful immortal".


8

That is the 「[草書体]{そうしょたい} = "cursive script"」 for 「喜」. http://image.search.yahoo.co.jp/search?rkf=2&ei=UTF-8&p=%E5%96%9C+%E8%8D%89%E6%9B%B8%E4%BD%93 That is why one's 77th birthday is called 「[喜寿]{きじゅ}」. More technically speaking, though, it is the "re-block-ized" and stylized form of the original cursive script for 「喜」. The original cursive is ...


9

It's a question somehow unanswered for a fairly long time, while it doesn't seem to be too complicated to answer. If I am reading a Chinese text to a Japanese audience, how can I know which reading to use for each character? Of the 音読み, there can be 呉音, 漢音, and 唐音 to choose from. There are two major types of situation to read Classical Chinese text in ...


4

It's NOT 留める has two readings, but two similar but distinct words share the written form 留める. As for how different (or how similar) they are, I could say the main difference between とめる and とどめる is aspect. The figure below explains how. EDIT: Note that とめる only happens in the transitional duration, while とどめる does as long as you're keeping it still (maybe ...


3

This is a complement to the other answer. kun'yomi do not exist by themselves per se. Instead, they exist in words (of which one possibility is a word identical with the kun'yomi). So what you want to do is memorize words including which part is the kun'yomi and which part is the okurigana. As/if your fluency for the language increases, you will be able ...


4

You should memorise that 一つ is pronounced ひとつ. It's certainly not the only compound where 一 appears, so don't memorise that 一 "is actually used as 一つ". 一 is also pronounced ひと in other contexts, such as 一人{ひとり}, so if anything, you should memorise that the kun'yomi of 一 is ひと.


9

弥次郎兵衛 is a way of writing the word ヤジロベエ. None of the kanji tell you what this word means. The only way you can tell what it means is by recognizing the word. (It refers to a kind of traditional Japanese toy that balances on a small point, for example in the shape of a dragonfly.) What if someone's name is 良? You can't call them Good. That's not ...



Top 50 recent answers are included