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外国人 is formed from "外" (outside), "国" (country), and "人" (person). Outside country person = foreigner. 外国 is formed from "外" (outside), "国" (country). Outside country = foreign. 人参 can mean either carrot or ginseng. Wiktionary's entry on 人参 refers to 人參 in Chinese, describing its etymology as a combination of the Chinese characters for person plus that of ...


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[外国]{がい・こく} + [人参]{にん・じん} + [政権]{せい・けん} → Foreign + Carrot + Regime OR [外国人]{がい・こく・じん} + [参政権]{さん・せい・けん} → Foreigner + Suffrage


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This refers to the phenomenon of "Girl Power." Suggested search phrase: "girl power spice girls tattoo." One of the Spice Girls had a tattoo that was constructed of the kanji you describe. It is not a Japanese word, but an attempt to use kanji to write the English phrase "Girl Power." No difference in meaning whether written horizontally or vertically.


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ありがとうございます is a greeting which was lexicalized long ago, and I don't think it's a good idea to analyze it like this and try to apply the modern style guideline. And while most of the recent style guidelines do say hiragana should be used for auxiliary verbs, this is not a strict rule. Not many people strictly follow this in daily life. I can't say, for ...


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Jisho says you can use both forms: 有り【あり】難う【がとう】ございます 有り【あり】難う【がとう】御座います【ございます】 Even though I suppose Japanese only use the kanji on formal texts. The kana-way is probably better for a daily-basis use, as mentioned here.


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I'd have to say this is read as おんなじから  (おんな + ちから) woman power/strength not if they'r in the same order… onna at the top in other words


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It is technically any "accident causing injury or death" however as your question points out it is generally accepted in society that it means that there was a fatal injury. In the event that this is displayed on the monitors it means that the train company had to stop train service (or later service is delayed) to deal with the accident. Anecdotal: A ...


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The latter is correct. When an accident happens, the train company need to stop trains and to let passengers know what is going on right away. Then don't know why the accident happened yet. Technically speaking, it is police that investigate an accident and find out the reason. Right after an accident, often it is apparent to everyone that the victim ...


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In most cases, the kanji can't be pronounced that way, as in that pronunciation does not match the standard on-yomi or kun-yomi for the characters at all. Basically, the kanji provide the meaning and the katakana show how the author wants it to be pronounced. It's a stylistic choice. This can be seen in song lyrics, too, where a word will have kanji but it ...


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It could be because 被 and 爆 are not part of Kyoiku Kanji. Kyoiku Kanji are the Kanji that are taught from 1st to 6th grade in Japanese elementary schools, and represent the Kanji that "everyone is supposed to know". On Japanese TV, when non-Kyoiku Kanji appears in subtitles it will usually either have Furigana above the Kanji or be in Katakana. So depending ...


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Some Japanese words are often written in katakana when people want to emphasize X-as-an-international-word or X-as-known-to-foreigners feelings. カイゼン ニッポン ツナミ ニンジャ, テンプラ, ゲイシャ, フジヤマ, ... ヒバクシャ is occasionally the subject of this phenomenon (e.g. 世界ヒバクシャ展, 国際ヒバクシャ医療センター), but in general, it's normally written in kanji. Depending on what and to whom you ...


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This is read as むこう. 向こう is the "standard" spelling, but people (especially novelists like him) sometimes use nonstandard or customary spellings like this. You can see the list of such kanji here: 送り仮名の省略 送り仮名の最短化


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"Come true" isn't the literal translation of 叶{かな}う. The word かなう means "to fit; match; accord", in this sense in accord with 叶's meaning in Classical Chinese. So we are practically saying 願いが叶う "my wish matches it" as if a fixed phrase corresponds to "my wish comes true". かなう once had tons of kanji transcriptions (see below), but most of them were culled ...


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The reading for 話 as a counter, according to jisho.org, is わ. The first kanji is read だい, and is a prefix for ordinal numbers. So the whole thing is read だいろくわ and means "sixth episode".



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