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3

I think learners should try to spend 99% of their time using the Japanese writing system and not romanization: Reading is a highly overlearned skill, and it takes absolutely huge amounts of practice to become literate in the Japanese writing system. Since learners have limited amounts of time, it's to their advantage to start using kana and kanji as early ...


5

I am not sure if there any traditions or rules regarding kanji lists, but usually when someone refers to a particular kanji it is called by its common use and the word it is in, without separating 訓読み from 音読み. Some kanjis have no 訓読み at all, some kanjis have a wide list of 音読み so it is very hard to distinguish which kanji are you referring to by calling ...


8

幻影【げんえい】 / 幻【まぼろし】: Almost the same, except that the former being 漢語 and the latter being 和語. Some ghostly or dreamy things that may or may not exist. 「幻の大陸」 means a continent whose existence is not confirmed. 幻想【げんそう】: This comes off to me as "imagination", "fantasy" or "fiction" rather than "illusion". It's in titles of many comics and games, but we ...


7

No, the main character of Death Note might be the very first person with the name 月【ライト】 (although there is no way to confirm this). Of course no dictionary says "月" can be read as ライト. But in Japan, it is legal to name a person using simple kanji, and specify its readings freely. If they really wish, parents can ignore what kanji dictionaries say about ...


4

I can't say anything authoritative about whether it has ever been used that way, but at least based on this site that lists unusual names, people seem to be very surprised that someone might actually use that name for someone. Outside the context of names I do not know of any prominent usages of it that way, however my knowledge is by no means exhaustive. ...


6

You say you're just going on vacation in Japan. Well, in that case, you might not need to know a whole lot of kanji. In fact, people go to Japan without knowing the language at all and manage to get around okay! So for your purposes, you might be fine without learning any kanji at all. But what if you're trying to learn the language for real? The fact ...


6

The counting system for large numbers is almost the same as Western numbers, except that digits are delimited into blocks of four instead of three. You add "thousand, million, billion, trillion, ..." for each 3 digit, and in Japanese, we add "万, 億, 兆, 京【けい】, ..." for each 4 digit. The "correct" format to write long numbers depends on the situation. ...


0

As spoken I think you're right on the money with 三兆四千七百六十五億二千百八十九万三千四百二十一 I would also give the possible option of writing it with an extra 「一」for visual clarity and to look more classical. 三兆四千七百六十五億二千(一)百八十九万三千四百二十一


0

I know this was asked a long time ago, but i will answer in case someone else wants this info.I'm more of a Chinese learner looking to also learn Japanese. So if anyone can correct me, feel free to. Here are some words I've seen that have the same or almost the same character and the same meanings. Sorry I didn't include tones for all of them, I got lazy. ...


0

鸞 ラン. That's a character with 30 strokes, but I think there's bigger...


3

This is actually two words: one consisting of two characters in katakana (ダメ) and the other is in hiragana (だ) - together ダメだ. だめ is often written using katakana as ダメ. The meaning depends on the context but could be "don't do it", "no", "it's not good", "you should not do it", "that's wrong".


8

The short answer is that 髙, or 「はしごたか」, is an alternate form of 高, and as such some people might use it. It does not represent a new/old character relationship (新字体・旧字体), however 髙 could have been a hand-written form. Apparently, though, this character is a little special, and it seems as though you're not technically allowed to use it in names. This ...


0

This is speculation on my part, but I believe it is possible that when 運 is used to mean one's luck or fortune, it may be interpreted as "[that which is] carried". To illustrate, consider the word 運命(うんめい), meaning destiny or fate. Taking the two kanji apart, we have: 運ぶ (はこぶ) meaning to carry and 命(いのち) meaning life. So, synthesized, it would mean ...


3

I think there are multiple interpretations of this character, but it's clearly a combination of 辶 (from 辶) and 軍, which suggests the movement-related meaning came first and "luck" was a derived meaning. But how was it derived? Here's what Henshall has to say: 辶 is movement 129. 軍 is army 466 q.v. Some scholars take the latter in a literal sense, ...


5

I'd like to add some more detail onto Zhen Lin's answer. My source is primarily Shogakukan's 1988 version of their Kokugo Dai Jiten Dictionary, Shinsou-ban (Revised edition). Morphology and Phonology Modern 出{で}来{き}る comes from older 出{で}来{く}る, comes from older 出{で}来{く}, comes from older 出{い}で来{く}. The oldest form is clearly a compound of 出{い}づ + 来{く}. ...



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