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7

In short: 体【からだ】: normal way to say "body". 身体【しんたい】: sounds more technical/academic/physical, and only mean the bodies of humans and large animals. Bodies of machines and robots are technically referred to as 筐体【きょうたい】. 身体【からだ】: another generally accepted way of writing "からだ" in kanji, and it's a 熟字訓. It's not taught at school, but virtually all Japanese ...


2

Great question! I love this answer from 知恵袋. I'll provide a minimal translation. Difference in Writing 体 is the standard way of writing it. 身体 is not. Difference in Meaning 体 actually has quite a few meanings. It can refer to the physical body itself, but it can also carry a meaning more akin to "health". On top of this, it can refer to pretty much ...


4

Etymology There are numerous theories about this. Japanese: The theories restricted to Japanese origins all revolve around the ideas of some larger geographic area that was split into "upper" (-kami or -gami) and "lower" (-shimo) halves. The main theories listed at the JA Wikipedia article on 武蔵国 (Musashi no Kuni) and at the Nihon Jiten page here ...


8

Technically speaking, kanji don't compound. The Japanese language is not made of kanji. It's made of words and and parts of words, many (but not all) of which can be written with kanji. When you put these words or parts of words together, you can often (but not always) write the resulting compound using kanji. Still, let's talk about "kanji compounds" ...


7

Although there have been many sets of radicals and many classifications over the years, the traditional set of 214 radicals is now usually identified with the famous 康煕字典 (Kangxi Zidian). To many people, if you say the radical, it's understood that you're referring to the traditional Kangxi classification. From that point of view, the traditional radical ...


5

(Revised) According to this site (http://www.saiga-jp.com/cgi-bin/dic.cgi?m=search&sc=0&f=0&j=)the radical is やね, which is Japanese for roof. I don't think this is one of the traditional 214 radicals (http://kanjialive.com/214-traditional-kanji-radicals/) but it does get used by Henshall in his book "Kanji: Remembering the Japanese Characters". ...


1

From Chinese character point of view of things the radical is definitely 入 (even though it is written 人 on top!). Why? While I'd take the following with a pinch of salt, I still think it's worth considering: Etymology (文字來源): Remnant Primitive, all of a persons stuff 工壬 under one roof 入 - complete -Chinese Etymology


6

The characters are almost certainly represent Tanabata (七夕), and are written in the fluid calligraphic style known as "grass style." The idea of bamboo here probably comes from the use of bamboo during the Tanabata festival. From the Wikipedia page on Tanabata: In present-day Japan, people generally celebrate this day by writing wishes, sometimes in ...


7

It looks to me like 「[七夕]{たなばた}」 in vertical cursive. It does not look like 「[竹]{たけ}」, which means "bamboo". Here is what 七夕 means: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tanabata


6

Welcome to the wonderful world of character encodings. :) If you're unfamiliar with them (things like "ASCII", "UTF-8", "Unicode", all that jazz), the fast and short of it is: what some computers see as being a ー, others see as '. If two computers aren't using the same encoding, text can get jumbled when moving information from one to the other. (This is a ...


4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


10

The Chinese part The answer to this question ultimately goes back into the Chinese from whence these characters originally came. ​1. Is there some logic (possibly stemming from the Chinese use of these characters) behind the readings being so similar? The on'yomi come from Chinese. Both 売 (selling) and 買 (buying) are simply two sides of the same ...


3

It's more obvious when you're looking at the non-simplified character for 売, 賣; the thing on top is 出 originally, which makes sense, but later reduced to 士. So, 賣/売 is indeed derived from 買. Related, you can typically get to an etymology of Chinese characters just by typing them into Google by their lonesome.


4

Most of the time, kanji are used to write words or parts of words—prefixes, suffixes, and so on. To know which reading is appropriate, you have to know the relevant Japanese words or parts of words. For example, look at the following:  にほんじん  'Japanese person/people' アメリカじん  'American(s)' がいこくじん  'foreigner(s)' Here, we have a suffix じん ...


2

Both strategies have their place, depending on which set of readings you're studying at a given time. 音読み When you're studying 音読み【おんよみ】(the Chinese-derived readings), it's best to learn the sound first, and then learn a couple of words that use it with each reading so that you can get a sense of when it's used. To use your 人 example, learn that it's ...


1

Here's what I see: (A)箱根の山は → OK (B)天下の岐 → 天下の𡸴 (C)・谷間ヲ・ならず → [函谷]{かん・こく}[関]{かん}も?ならず (D)万丈の山干・の谷 → 万丈の山干(looks like ⺅+刃)の谷 (E)前に・びえ → 前にそびえ (F)雲りえに友ら → しりえに友? ??? (G)雲は山・めぐり → 雲は山をめぐり (H)霧は谷そとざす → OK (I)昼なそ暗さ → 昼なを暗き (J)杉の並木 → OK (K)着物の小径は → [羊腸]{よう・ちょう}の小径は (L)莟・らか → 莟[滑]{な}らか (M)一天関に当るや → 一夫関に当るや (N)万天ヲ・くな・ → 万夫も開くなし (O)天下に・する → 天下に[旅]{たび}する (P)剛毅のヲののふ ...


5

This is a famous song 箱根八里【はこねはちり】 by Rentaro Taki. (English translation) http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%AE%B1%E6%A0%B9%E5%85%AB%E9%87%8C This song was written before 現代仮名遣い was introduced, and its original lyrics are full of kanjis which even native Japanese (including myself) can't read any more. It seems your umbrella has simplified some of the ...


8

It looks like 印象 to me.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


5

The form of 花 with a gap in the radical making it 4 strokes instead of 3 is called the 旧字体 (old character form) and the one that is used most of the time these days is called 新字体. Neither is correct or sloppy, they're just two different ways of writing the same character. This is related to the fact that characters in general have been simplified in ...



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