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English counterparts of 停める、止める、and 留める in the transitive form will be: ‘park’ to 停める as in 車を停める – park a car (in parking lot). ‘stop’ to 止める as in 出血を止める - stop bleeding 、機械を止める – stop the machine. ‘keep / leave’ to 留める as in 心に留める〈留意する〉- keep in mind, (荷物を)手元に留める – keep the luggage at hand, beside the case of 'fastening the buttons' and 'catching the ...


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This looks like it isn't really related to foxes, but is オタ魂 written as one character. (I would read it オタ[魂]{こん}.) オタ is the abbreviation of オタク otaku 魂 meaning "soul" or "spirit" So, loosely something like ... "gamer's soul"? Edit. As @choco points out in the comments, オタコン refers to Otacon of the Metal Gear series.


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I searched for your question on the net. 朝鮮民主主義人民共和国(Democratic People's Republic of Korea) is a string of 11 kanji and it is comparatively well known. 外航船舶建造融資利子補給臨時措置法 is a string of 17 kanji. It is the law about the promotion in the Japanese shipping industry. I saw this for the first time and I think it is very little known.


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Since you said your Japanese isn't yet strong enough, I'll write here what the sites pointed to in the comments to your question have to said 停める This is "to stop" like a train or bus at a station or busstop. The general sense is to stop briefly before moving on. So, for example, you could use it to say something like "I stopped to unload my groceries." ...


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If an i-adjective is directly modifying a noun then it is written in the dictionary form. No conjugation is necessary, so 新しい車 is correct. btw 車 is pronounced くるま in this case. 新車{しんしゃ}is a noun in its own right. It is not a combination of an adjective modifying a noun. Adjectives can be altered before modifying the noun. For example you can say おいしそうなケーキ, ...


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This is a matter of fonts, not a matter of simplification. Much like depending on the font being displayed, a Latin alphabet "a" will either appear with or without the hook at the top, the font determines the exact appearance of the character 人. There are fonts that try to preserve handwriting for CJK characters that will display the 人 character in the way ...


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Japanese didn't have any original letters in ancient times. Kanji was brought into Japan from China in the 3rd or 4th century. When old Japanese people adopted kanji, they called each letter as Chinese people pronounced it. While, kanji often had the meaning which matched some Japanese words, so they came to read ''山'' as やま, ''空'' as そら, ''人'' as ひと, for ...


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The very answer to your question is why I like Japanese so much. As you noticed a same word can be written with different kanji: that is not limited to verbs. If kanji changes meaning changes too (that is especially true concerning verbs, nouns are more subject to stylistic preferences: eg. かっこいい(casual form)・恰好良い(old form)・格好いい(normal form)). In order to ...


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There's no absolute rule on this, but there are several rules of thumb: Grammatical constructs use hiragana, semantic constructs use kanji. The word 来る・くる is used both semantically to mean "to arrive", and grammatically, in a general sense of arrival or completion. Consider: 東京に来た。 versus そろそろいい天気になってきた。 Since the grammatical sense is used; hiragana ...


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The character of 體 (today 体 in 当用漢字) meaning the body is composed of the characters of 骨 meaning human and creatures’ bones on the left side and 豊 meaning rich on the right side. According to「常用字解」compiled by the great scholar, Chinese character / language etymologist, 白川静 and published by 平凡社, the letter of 骨 features the shape of the bones above the ...


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Looks like 「[竈]{かまど}」 to me. It means a "cooking stove" -- the kind where you burn wood. Another reading is 「へっつい」 for the same meaning, but 「かまど」 is far more common.


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體 is the old traditional-Chinese spelling (旧字体【きゅうじたい】) of modern simplified spelling (新字体【しんじたい】) 体. The radical of the older form is 骨, "bone". More information about the character is available on Wiktionary: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/體


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It is a "commercial slang" newly coined from 「爆発的な誕生」(ばくはつてきなたんじょう), which means "explosive birth". It does not really mean "revelation", but there may be contexts where that translation might be valid. As a Japanese-speaker, I could attest to the impactfulness of how 「[爆誕]{ばくたん}」 both looks and sounds.


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It's not a real word, obviously. It's probably an abbreviation of 爆発誕生, putting the words explosion and birth together. Bulbapedia takes this literally and translates it as explosive birth. However, I think the 爆発 also could just be making the 誕生 part sound more epic;「幻のポケモンルギア誕生」does not sound as exciting of a movie title.


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Just ask Google translate to detect the language, then hit 'Translate'. Google translate can be pretty sucky from time to time so don't treat it as gospel, but use it as a translation aid: https://translate.google.fr/?pli=1#auto/en/初商業誌 "The first commercial magazine"


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As mentioned by Earthliŋ, these are indices in the Classic Nelson kanji dictioary. A quick search tells us that N5114 corresponds to the index N6610 in the New Nelson dictionary. Here's an image from my New Nelson dictionary. N5116 presumably corresponds to N6612 then. When I look for pages that mention this, it looks like they're using outdated versions ...


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I think that N5116 is a dictionary index for the "Classic Nelson", i.e. The Original Modern Reader's Japanese–English Character Dictionary: Classic Edition by Andrew Nelson, so that N5116 means "character 5116 in the Classic Nelson". The actual kanji 響 seems to be 5114 in this dictionary (i.e. N5114 in the notation used above) and I'm guessing that N5116 is ...


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It's read as はつしょうぎょうし. You can never find it in dictionaries because it's actually three words: 初【はつ】: first (jisho.org) 商業誌【しょうぎょうし】: commercial book/magazine (often as opposed to dōjinshi) 商業【しょうぎょう】: commerce (jisho.org) 誌【し】: (suffix) magazine (jisho.org) 初商業誌 is typically used when a dōjin manga-ka makes a debut on a magazine available in the ...


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Perhaps it's simply because her family name, 花澤, had been used before the use of 澤 was prohibited in 1948. (BTW, 花澤香菜 is a 芸能人 but this seems to be her real name.) You cannot use 澤 for given names of newly-born babies today. (i.e., 沢子 will be accepted by the government, but 澤子 is not). However, kanji of existing names (including both family names and given ...


3

To complement Avery's answer, one thing that may be worth investigating is that the Nihon Shoki has a particular phonetic orthography for Japanese (so-called Man’yōgana or ateji, which are directly based on Chinese and Korean phonetic use of kanji). Whereas the Kojiki and Man’yōshū phonograms are based on Early Middle Chinese (also the source of Japanese ...


2

There is a good explanation here: 【1】「[同義語]{どうぎご}」は、「あす」と「あした」などのように、[全く]{まったく}[同じ]{おなじ}[意味]{いみ}で[表記]{ひょうき}や[発音]{はつおん}が[異なる]{ことなる}[語]{ご}。 【2】「類義語」「類語」「シノニム」は、「あがる」と「のぼる」、「[遊戯]{ゆうぎ}」と「ゲーム」などのように、意味の似た語をさす。 【3】「同義語」と「類義語」とを区別せずに用いることもある。 (1) 同義語 refers to words that have the exact same meaning, but that have a different spelling or ...


4

In both cases, it is read as ホウ (the on'yomi). One simple and helpful thing to realize is that the ほう reading means "direction" but the かた reading refers to either a person or way of doing something. If you think about it, the first sentence is 外の方が家の中より暖かそうです。 "It seems warmer outside than inside the house." たいふうは西の方に去った。 "The typhoon went ...



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