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1

Usually start by hiragana, then katakana. With this you can learn kanji (reading on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ}, kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ}). When you get a kanji dictionary you can notice different ways to read the same kanji: on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ} usually with reading in katakana kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ} usually with reading in hiragana Here have an example of ...


4

I found this in a kanji dictionary from 1920s. http://kindai.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/936724 (set コマ番号 to 866 and you see the page) It lists four sounds for 閉, but none of the following 熟語 has a sound other than ヘイ. I guess this kind of description (ヘツ、ヘチ。方結切。屑。) originally originates in classical Chinese hanzi dictionaries like 廣韻 or 康煕字典.


3

As others have noted, the reading へつ is not listed in other dictionaries, such as デジタル大辞泉. But that could be a measure of the lexicographer's rigor. So at this point, maybe it's an error, maybe it's not. Additional evidence is found in the corresponding Chinese reading of 閉. The coda /-tu/ typically corresponds to Middle Chinese coda /-t/, which would be ...


12

In this case, it's verb-object, like the Chinese these morphemes were borrowed from, rather than object-verb, like native Japanese syntax: 切腹 (せっぷく) = 切(せつ) (verbal morpheme) + 腹 (ふく) (object morpheme) 腹切り(はらきり) = 腹(はら) (object morpheme) + 切り(きり) (verbal morpheme) Generally, the morphemes in Sino-Japanese compounds (called 漢語【かんご】 in Japanese) follow ...


2

The canonical word order in a Chinese sentence is SVO (subject-verb-object), while Japanese exhibits SOV (subject-object-verb) syntax. Sino-Japanese word order just refers to the appearance of Chinese word order in Sino-Japanese compounds. Therefore 腹切り, which is a native compound, exhibits OV word order (being a nominalisation of 腹を切る), while the Chinese ...


2

The 『デジタル大辞泉』 does not list the reading へつ, so I'd call it an error. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/197949/m1u/%e9%96%89/ The dictionary 学研漢和大辞典 does not list any words with this reading either.


5

In the first place, -がい is the rendaku form of an independent noun かい, which is defined under デジタル大辞泉 section of the Kotobank page you cited (I don't understand why 大辞林 第三版 section is missing this definition for かい). This かい (from archaic かひ) is, according to 小学館's 日本語源大辞典 which I own, a nominalization of archaic verb かふ "to substitute, compensate" ...


4

Searching the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese, I find the following results:  生きがい   606 results, 75% of total  生き甲斐   186 results, 23% of total  生甲斐    20 results, 2% of total As you can see, in this corpus the most common way to write it is 生きがい. In fact, this is the form recommended by the NHK漢字表記辞典 (the kanji 斐 isn't included on the ...


7

Yes, mixtures of this type are possible, and it's quite common with certain words. For example, 石鹸 has a rather difficult second kanji, and the word is often written 石けん instead. 轟音 is often written ごう音. And so on. In your example, none of the characters is particularly rare and all of them are on the 常用漢字表 (the official jōyō kanji chart), so ...


7

Yes you are right, 匂い and 香り is always for good smells like from flowers, food, etc, whereas 臭い is mostly for undesirable smells. But sometimes 臭い is neutral, which case I think your example falls into. BTW that jisho.org page you cited seems to be a little confusing, because it lists [臭]{にお}い (noun) and [臭]{くさ}い (adjective) jumbled together. So, just be ...


5

It is 極【きょく】. See also the (closed) question Superdry. 極度乾燥(しなさい) for the origins of this.


0

I don't know much about movies but here is my guess. “総” means “whole”. eg. “総収入” is “total income”. Googling “総監修” gave some examples and it seems to be used as “everything is supervised by somebody”. Thus “ストーリー総監修” seems to mean “the whole story was supervised by somebody”.


6

In the dictionary 字通【じつう】 (1996), we find: [3] よく温熟する、ならう、たずねる。 In addition, the dictionary 類聚名義抄【るいじゅみょうぎしょう】 (approx. 12th century) lists* the following meanings for 温: アタゝム・タツヌ・ウルフ・ツゝム・シル・アタゝカナリ・ウツクシ・ヤハラカナリ 尋【たず】ねる (or rather, タツヌ) is the second listed. Moving on now to Chinese sources, in 漢典, it is written: (2) 复习 [review] ...


6

As noted in the question comments, the kanji 円 was originally 圓. The nutshell version of the article Yang Muye linked is that monks developed a shorthand version of 圓 that looked like a box with a vertical line through it: . Over time, the shape of the surrounding box changed, likely due to the same anatomical and mechanical processes that inform any ...



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