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Move on whenever you feel like you have nothing left to learn from one of them. Hiragana is the very first step to learning Japanese. Once you know it, Katakana and Kanji both become easier because you can look at how they're pronounced, plus hiragana and katakana have some similarities. Also, you get used to the effort needed to memorize an alphabet. My ...


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That's two kanji with 1 & 12 strokes (in that order).


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There is an official document that covers a number of these. For example: つくる 084 【作る】こしらえる。米を作る。規則を作る。新記録を作る。計画を作る。詩を作る。笑顔を作る。 会社を作る。機会を作る。組織を作る。 【造る】大きなものをこしらえる。醸造する。 船を造る。庭園を造る。宅地を造る。道路を造る。数寄屋造りの家。酒を造る。 【創る*】独創性のあるものを生み出す。 新しい文化を創(作)る。画期的な商品を創(作)り出す。 * 一般的には「創る」の代わりに「作る」と表記しても差し支えないが,事柄の「独創性」を 明確に示したい場合には,「創る」を用いる。 Or this, which is ...


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The first kanji is 宵{よい}, yes. The character alone means evening (though sometimes also leans towards a meaning of "night" in Chinese) 宵{よい}の刻{こく} means "evening" under this context. Due to the constraints on size of characters and pixels, I suppose they could only write one line in the 月 part for it to still be readable. Obviously a trait of most ...


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I think it's 宵{よい}の刻{こく}, and means "evening time". More info here.


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「中」(ちゅう) is an 音読み (onyomi) so it is used in multi-kanji compound words and words that do not end in hiragana (途中 [tochuu], 午前中 [gozenchuu], 中心 [chuushin], 中途半端 [chuutohanpa]). 「中」(なか) can be a stand-alone word in a sentence. However, it can also be used in combinations (仲良し [nakayoshi], 仲直り [nakanaori], 真夜中 [mayonaka]), place names (中野区 [Nakano-ku], 中川区 ...


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I may be wrong, sorry for that. But I think that 中{なか} can be used by itself. For example: 猫{ねこ}は部屋{へや}の中{なか}にいます。 - Cat is in a room. (lit. Cat exists in a room.) Whereas 中{ちゅう} can't be used by itself but must be a part of a word. For example: 中{ちゅう}学{がく}生{せい} - Middle school student. I think that's it. By the way: 中{なか} is kun-reading, and 中{ちゅう} - ...


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Some people argue that the use of "障害者" is politically incorrect, because the kanji "害" has the meaning like "to harm". Because of this, there has been shift to "障がい", especially in media and official documents. It seems 障がい was first seen in 1990s on newspapers. On the other hand, some people think that it is oversensitive, and that the mixture of kanji and ...


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I managed to collect the data of kanji usage frequencies from various sources: Japanese Wikipedia's snapshot About 12900 files from Aozora Bunko - these are mostly novels, I believe Public tweets from Twitter's Streaming API You can find it here (the one you're looking for is aozora.json). Each file contains JSON table, format is described in ...


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These are the same character, but the image you showed gives in its traditional form, and an old style. 逃 in previous forms has 2 dots in its radical 辶, as with many other characters. Also, the writing style is slightly old, so it looks different in "font" if you will to the computer graphics version of the character. Looks like you didn't have much ...


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It says 格納{かくのう}: [名](スル)物を一定の場所に納め入れること。「航空機を―する」 (大辞泉) So the thin 糸 and 内 aren't separate characters, they're both part of 納.


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Although Shinmeikai and Daijiten have these as being exactly the same, Meikyō provides a narrow band of usage for 拡げる. [This answer was rewritten to reflect this.] 拡げる is used for "broaden" or "enlarge," but not for "unfurl". 広げる can be used for all three. There is another kanji associated with ひろげる, 展げる, which is used only in the sense of "unfurl". It's ...


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Or do native Japanese speaker not think about the implicit association with "east" in the name of their country in a way that would make sense to think of a western counterpart (Japan obviously isn't east or west to anyone who lives there) This is true. Many people know, as a piece of knowledge, that the etymology of 日本 has something to do with east or ...


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日末 'himatsu' would mean "end of the day" if anything if you wanted to say (something of the) setting sun 落日 (raku jitsu) might be appropriate Check out http://jisho.org/search/setting%20sun


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Neither Wiktionary (English / Japanese) nor jisho.org contain any reference to 日末, so I don't think that it's possible to use this kanji combination as a word. Swapping the kanji around, there is an entry on jisho.org for 末日 (read as まつじつ), but the definition is "last day (of a month)" rather than "land of the setting sun". I'm not sure how common this word ...


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Yes, 黒 is the 新字体{しんじたい} (simplified) form of 黑, which took the two dots at the top and turned them into a straight line. The same simplification can be seen in 曾 -> 曽. This was all part of the 1945 simplification scheme in Japanese. 黑 is still used in chinese though, both simplified and traditional, and has the exact same meaning of "black", as you pointed ...



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