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6

I think ください in お待ちください is an auxiliary verb, and thus should be written in kana according to the "proper rule". Few people strictly obey this, as you know. 待っ and 待ち are both 連用形 (te-form) of 待つ, and 待っ is 促音便 of 待ち. I've never seen such an argument that one should use kana in 待ってください but kanji in お待ち下さい, or kana in 来てください but kanji in お越し下さい.


2

I haven't read that book, but 旦 means morning, not evening. I think this "opening up of night" refers to the Japanese word 夜【よ】明【あ】け ("morning, dawn", where 夜=night, 明=open), but I don't know why nightbreak suddenly came in. This kanji is rarely used except in the compound 元旦【がんたん】 ("the morning of New Year's Day") or in several ateji compounds such as ...


5

A lot has changed, IMO one good way is to compare newspapers from the days. This one is from the Meiji era: http://www.geocities.jp/tanaka_kunitaka/takeshima/saninshimbun/02.gif This one from during WW2: http://userdisk.webry.biglobe.ne.jp/005/523/32/N000/000/000/123528635262516412541.jpg This is from 1960: ...


2

I don't know exactly why 船越義珍 used 修業 since 修行 would also make sense. But since he did, I think the quote should only be considered correct the way you stated it: 空手の修業は一生である。 Firstly, since you probably don't know, 修 is often pronounced しゅう (shū, long U), but in both 修業 and 修行, it may be pronounced しゅ (shu, short U), so there are three words, しゅぎょう ...


5

修行 is primarily used for (endless/lifelong) religious discipline; it's something Buddhist monks or priests do every day. Note that this kanji 行 (gyō) on its own means 'religious training/discipline/practice', as in 行者 (gyōja, person who does 修行, especially that of 修験道), 滝行 (takigyō, waterfall meditation), 苦行 (kugyō, hard discipline), etc. You can also use 修行 ...


1

The word 修業 is used for something you can complete/graduate/master. This is why we use 卒業 to express a graduation from something. I think we never use 卒行 in this situation. At least I have never seen 卒行 in my life. On the other hand, the word 修行 is used for something you can not complete. Thus, when you say Karate is a lifelong pursuit. 修行 does fit ...


0

From what I can see on jisho.org: 修業{しゅうぎょう} is pursuit of knowledge; studying; learning; training; completing a course 修行{しゅぎょう} is training; practice; discipline; study. From the definitions I would imagine that no, they are don't mean the exact same thing on their own, but perhaps in context as Erakk said, they might be able to be used interchangeably. ...


0

I am a novice in this language, but i can say that, basically: 業 means "act" or "deed" 行 means "to go" or simply "go" So, depending on the context/the way the phrase is formed, it could be used interchangeably. Any more experienced can correct me if im wrong.


7

Here's a question: are you sure that your characterisation of the situation is accurate? Are all, or the majority, of new words in Japanese created by importation from other languages? Do you have any statistics about this? It's often relatively obvious to English speakers when we see a katakana word imported from English, but how do you know you're not ...


11

It reads に、さんにち (the comma is purely orthographic, you may or may not write it out). Similarly, we say... 一、二日 いち、ににち 三、四日 さん、よっか ← irregular! 四、五日 し、ごにち 五、六日 ご、ろくにち Longer span equivalents are hardly heard, perhaps because we come to use "a week" (一週間) or other higher units then, I suppose. ふた、みっか might actually sound surprisingly ...


3

It is read 「にさんにち」. Colloquially, people say 「にさんち」 as well.


4

Some characters indeed have tricky stroke orders even for native speakers (writers?), for instance, 左 is started from the horizontal line but 右 is from the slanted one, and so on. But in your case, it seems to be a simple misunderstanding. I don't know which font you use to browse this site, but typically, 母 and 日 would look like in the image below, ...


3

Does the following explanation help? The logogramme 母 is formed from 女 by adding two dots representing the prominent breasts typical to lactating women (while 女 epitomises a woman tempting a man.) For the record the stroke order for 女 is indicated here -> http://jisho.org/search/%23kanji%20%E5%A5%B3 . So (hopefully) you experience less difficulty in ...


1

Technically the correct order is left to bottom, and so on. You could do it in your own order, but I personally would not recommend that. 日 and 母 are very different characters to begin with. I would recommend using jisho.com for the stroke orders, as typed characters can be very distorted. http://jisho.org/search/%23kanji%20%E6%AF%8D The only way to really ...


1

I suggest A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters, by Kenneth Henshall. It gives both the true etymology (if known) and a mnemonic explanation that is more useful to memory. It seems to be exactly what you were looking for.


5

If you mean edible seaweed, 海藻 is right to use. Nori, wakame, mozuku, hiziki and mekabu are all 海藻. They look like http://bit.ly/1gfJick In Japan, usually, people don't eat 海草. Dugongs like to eat 海草. http://www.arkive.org/dugong/dugong-dugon/video-01a.html 海草 is often used to mean 海藻 by mistake.


2

海藻 = seaweed, 海草 = spermatophyta living in sea (water). For details, see -> https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B5%B7%E8%97%BB together with https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%B5%B7%E8%8D%89.



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