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塩田{えんでん} - Google Image Search


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There are a few 田 words which use the デン reading. Each of them is a kind of field or plantation. 水田 is すいでん (paddy field) (でんすい sounds like a typo), 油田 is ゆでん (oil field) and 桑田 is そうでん (mulberry field). The 水 in 水田 is present because it's a water-filled (irrigated) paddy field. Source - Both Google and Obenkyo (android app)


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かな can state any degree of probability, from nearly zero to all but certain. Another important feature is that かな conveys intent of communication, thus it could imply request or desire so much as English "I wonder". This word is usually only used in non-polite sentences (in most cases, the polite counterpart is でしょうか). Down to your particular case, the ...


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Because, in principle, Japanese kanji simplification only affects those in 常用漢字 (to be exact, 1,945 of them which joined 常用漢字 by 1981). The 常用漢字 (originally named 当用漢字) was legislated to limit kanji usage within it, as the first step of gradual abolition of kanji. So no regard is given to unlisted kanjis in the first place, that is, there was no official ...


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It is because that "䜌" is too complex and difficult to write in short space. Since "亦" is simplified version of "䜌" in Shodo(Japanese calligraphy), Japanese usually use simplifed version "亦" But there is some expections,like "団欒" An expression like this makes Japanese a little old-fashioned.


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I haven't seen the show, so I'm uncertain of the context, but かな refers to "probably" in the translation. Ending a sentence with かな is a very casual way of expressing uncertainty. For example: あの人はアメリカ人かな。 I wonder if that person is an American. It's subtle, but "probably" might be a slightly too "certain" translation in this case (but again, ...


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The Japanese Ministry of Education has published a list of kanji. I think this is the official document: http://www.bunka.go.jp/kokugo_nihongo/pdf/jouyoukanjihyou_h22.pdf The "proper" form is whatever form is in that document. So the answer is basically that the government determines the "proper" form.


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I believe [無駄足]{むだあし} is derived from [無駄足]{むだあし}を[運]{はこ}ぶ ("move one's feet in vain"), which is one of a series of counterintuitive idioms Japanese vocabulary has. [小腹]{こばら}が[減]{へ}る "little stomach get empty" actually describing "be a little hungry" (cf. [腹]{はら}が[減]{へ}る "be hungry") [大]{おお}ぼらを[吹]{ふ}く "blow on a big conch" actually, "blow on a conch ...


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Your guess seems to be right. 顚 is considered to be an 異体字 (variant form) for 顛. There is no difference in meaning.


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凹 The stroke order you mentioned is the correct one indeed. It can be found in the 新漢語林【しんかんごりん】, for example. This page, kakijun, offers an explanation for the stroke order: Traditionally, ie. based upon the 字彙【じい】 and 康熙【こうき】 dictionaries, 凹 is categorized under the 凵【かんにょう】 radical, so this part is written individually. 凵 is written with | stroke to ...


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Usually start by hiragana, then katakana. With this you can learn kanji (reading on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ}, kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ}). When you get a kanji dictionary you can notice different ways to read the same kanji: on'yomi form 音読み{おんよみ} usually with reading in katakana kun'yomi form 訓読み{くんよみ} usually with reading in hiragana Here have an example of ...


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I found this in a kanji dictionary from 1920s. http://kindai.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/936724 (set コマ番号 to 866 and you see the page) It lists four sounds for 閉, but none of the following 熟語 has a sound other than ヘイ. I guess this kind of description (ヘツ、ヘチ。方結切。屑。) originally originates in classical Chinese hanzi dictionaries like 廣韻 or 康煕字典.


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As others have noted, the reading へつ is not listed in other dictionaries, such as デジタル大辞泉. But that could be a measure of the lexicographer's rigor. So at this point, maybe it's an error, maybe it's not. Additional evidence is found in the corresponding Chinese reading of 閉. The coda /-tu/ typically corresponds to Middle Chinese coda /-t/, which would be ...


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In this case, it's verb-object, like the Chinese these morphemes were borrowed from, rather than object-verb, like native Japanese syntax: 切腹 (せっぷく) = 切(せつ) (verbal morpheme) + 腹 (ふく) (object morpheme) 腹切り(はらきり) = 腹(はら) (object morpheme) + 切り(きり) (verbal morpheme) Generally, the morphemes in Sino-Japanese compounds (called 漢語【かんご】 in Japanese) follow ...


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The canonical word order in a Chinese sentence is SVO (subject-verb-object), while Japanese exhibits SOV (subject-object-verb) syntax. Sino-Japanese word order just refers to the appearance of Chinese word order in Sino-Japanese compounds. Therefore 腹切り, which is a native compound, exhibits OV word order (being a nominalisation of 腹を切る), while the Chinese ...


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The 『デジタル大辞泉』 does not list the reading へつ, so I'd call it an error. http://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/leaf/jn2/197949/m1u/%e9%96%89/ The dictionary 学研漢和大辞典 does not list any words with this reading either.



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