Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I'm in total agreement with 白川's answer. It's difficult memorizing all the readings especially the onyomi ones because much of them are the same. At times it might get confusing. I feel it better to learn the meaning, and one of the kun/on reading. If it is a verb, I give priority to that reading. As I am still a beginner, I have barely read any Japanese ...


1

Many (almost half) of the first year kanji are in fact radicals, so just by learning kanji one by one, in many cases you are already learning radicals. The kanji corresponding to a radical will usually appear before the kanji using this radical. (An exception being, for example, 艸 "grass" with corresponding radical 艹. The radical appears in the first year ...


1

In short, yes, it's likely to be helpful. There is, however, a caveat: 汉字 and 漢字 are different, sometimes subtly, sometimes not. While their meaning tends to line up more or less perfectly, you do come across nuances in meaning and usage. Pronunciation differences between 普通话 and 音読み are rife, but somewhat regular. Furthermore, 汉字 are different from 漢字 ...


0

I think your Hanzi vocabulary can be definitely helpful for learning Japanese. In general, Kanji is always the most frustrating part for those whose mother tongue is not Chinese. But for Chinese people Kanji could be the most easiest to learn. Since most of the letters in Kanji have the same or similar meaning as they are in Hanzi, so you may save lots of ...


0

名, I have seen the meaning being given as "reputation". I think this is a better meaning than "name". Then "名前" means "what goes ahead of the reputation". Also to reduce ambiguity, 名 can be used as a counter and for other words.


4

According to the 語源由来辞典 etymology dictionary, the 前 part is believed to have been added as an honorary form, mostly since the Meiji era.


8

マル means 'circle', and this is clearly the word 丸{まる}. But the origin of バツ is less clear. It may be from 罰点{ばってん}, and in fact I've always assumed the correct kanji would (in theory) be 罰, but dictionary editors appear to be less certain. 日本国語大辞典 says: 「ばってん(罰点)からできた語か And 明鏡国語辞典 says: 「罰点(ばってん)」からか。 And 大辞林 says: 「罰点」から生じた語か Note ...


1

Kanji were brought to Japan about 4th centry from China. Hiragana are phonetic characters created from Chinese readings of kanji in around the eighth century in Japan. For example, あ was created from 安 and い was created from 以. Katakana were mainly created by Japanese scholars from Chinese readings of kanji at the same time that hiragana were created. For ...


3

Kanji are supposed to be pronounced and their pronunciation is given in kana. This means that any word in kanji has a unique representation in kana. However, there are different words with the same kanji representation, e.g. 明日{あした} 明日{あす} 明日{みょうにち} Similarly, the same kana sequence can represent many different words. One good reason to use kanji here ...


2

It seems to be 汗のない社会は堕落だ, which is a variation on 「愛なき人生は暗黒なり。汗なき社会は堕落なり。」Google tells me this is a quote from 前田又兵衛. Something like "A life without love is darkness. A society without effort is corruption."


6

「[新]{しん}メニュー」 is a very common phrase. We say 新ドラマ、新アニメ、新プラン、新ビール, etc. all the time and I do not think anyone finds it "improper". At least, I have never heard a native speaker complaining about it. What is extremely uncommon is that they inserted the 「ウ」 in there. Or is that a typo on your part? We do say 「[新]{あたら}しいメニュー」 as well, but the phrase lacks ...


3

Your example is indeed pronounced 新{しん}メニュー. Because 新メニュー is shorter, and thus more convenient. It's just a common compound noun. If you look up 新{しん} in your dictionary, it should mention that it can be (and very commonly is) used as a noun prefix, unsurprisingly meaning "new". Plenty, but a large share of them are long technical compound nouns such as ...


8

I think many people use the two forms freely without a difference in meaning, and I think your sentence is actually a good illustration that this is true. I don't think there's any detectable difference in meaning between 記入してください and 記入して下さい in your example. In fact, I wouldn't be surprised if whoever wrote it didn't even notice they were writing it two ...


3

It appears so. For example, it's recognised in this aggregate dictionary. Japanese Wikipedia also has a page for it. And searching the Shonagon corpus yields 15 counts of 菫色; 28 counts of すみれ色; and one count of すみれいろ。This indicates that perhaps the kana variant すみれ is more common, though in literary instances, the kanji variant is also acceptable. ...


6

Though it is fairly subtle, there is a difference between the two. It sounds a little more literary and/or formal when 「に」 is inserted than when it is not. There is no difference in meaning. Regarding the kanji vs. kana issue, the author could have chosen to use either for both as far as "correctness" is concerned. It seems to me that he made an ...


19

You can. It's written 貰う in kanji. People will generally be able to read it. It is, however, not recommended by the Agency for Cultural Affairs. The kanji 貰 and the reading もらう are not included on the Jōyō Kanji chart. It is not recommended by the NHK漢字表記辞典 either. According to the NHK dictionary, this word should always be written in kana. In any ...


3

One convenient way to manage situations like this is to combine following pieces to convey your intention: 同音【どうおん】 same reading (on- or kun-) 同訓【どうくん】 same kun-reading 異音【いおん】 different reading 同義【どうぎ】 same meaning 異義【いぎ】 different meaning 類義【るいぎ】 similar meaning 同字【どうじ】 same kanji 異字【いじ】 different kanji For example, there are 同音異義語, 同音異字語, 同字異音異義語, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included