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Chicken meat is "tori niku" (鶏肉) and duck meat is "kamo niku" (鴨肉).


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With the kanji for duck, of course! 鴨肉{かもにく} Though 鴨 is more commonly written in kana as かも or カモ.


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My favorite example is この先生きのこるには. It was originally posted in a net forum, and was intended to be read as このさき、いきのこるには (how to survive longer). But many native speakers have misread this as このせんせい、きのこるには (how does this sensei mushroom(?)), even though there is no such verb as きのこる. This sounded so funny that it soon became a piece of net slang, and ...


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I'm not sure if this answers your question exactly, but here are the examples I find interesting. 一【いち】 / 一人【ひとり】 / 一人称【いちにんしょう】 大人【おとな】 / 大人数【おおにんずう】 / 大人数人【おとなすうにん】


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It's [熟字訓]{じゅくじくん}. Excerpt from Wiktionary: A Japanese word whose kanji spelling conveys the meaning based on the individual characters, but the reading is not directly related to the spellling. For example, 大 (“big”, usually read ō in kun'yomi compounds) and 人 (“person”, usually read hito in kun'yomi compounds) combine to form 大人, meaning “adult” but ...


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Indeed, what is truth? The answer to your question has two parts: one very simple, and another very difficult. Today, these three characters are used in slightly different contexts: 誠{まこと} is "sincerity," i.e. a basis in a true heart (see below). Such a judgmental word is not heard much these days in Japanese or English. In fact, you most often hear it in ...


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Hiragana are used for native Japanese words, but also very commonly for kanji, even for onyomi. Readings of kanji can be split up into 3 broad types: On'yomi These are readings taken from the Chinese mainland when kanji were imported to Japan. The reason why there are so many is that kanji sometimes took readings of chinese characters from different ...


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Why did they choose exactly these kanji characters for spelling these countries' names? It's hard to tell exactly why, because these are mixture of various transliterations done by Japanese and Chinese (of course different between Mandarin or Cantonese or other dialects) speakers that happened to hear the sound for the first time. For example, there ...


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I don't exactly know what you mean by "translations", but kanji have different readings, on'yomi readings (which are adapted from the original Chinese) and kun'yomi readings (which have nothing to do with the Chinese reading, but map a native Japanese word to a kanji). To distinguish the "type" (on'yomi vs. kun'yomi) of these readings, the on'yomi is ...


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General phonetic "rules" For a lot of words that are now written using Katakana, there was a tiny amount of logic to it. 亜 transcribed ア virtually exclusively, 伊 is a very common kanji for transcribing イ, 加 for カ, 利 for リ, and generally the kanji from which Katakana come is a good rule, though far from perfect (as noted with ア, and in タ which is usually ...


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僕 and ぼく 僕 is more common, but ぼく is also used in casual situation. こわれる and 壊れる 壊れる is much more common. こわれる is acceptable to use. かさ and 傘 Both are common to use. はしご and 梯子 はしご is much more common. 梯子 could be used, but it is not recommended. In general you can refer 常用漢字一覧 to find out individual kanji is common or not. If [常用漢字]{じょうようかんじ} is a list ...


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The very first thing I would like to mention is that names (whether given to places or people) do not necessarily correspond to a pre-existant precise meaning or pronunciation. See for example this question and this article. Of course, there are also occasions when a placename's reading has no connection whatsoever with the kanji used to write it, and ...


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While other L-shaped partials, like @blutorange said in his comment (走鬼麦風爪 etc.), are only stylistic alterations when you use these parts in the left side of a kanji, ⻌ is inherently L-shaped, because it originates from the combination of left-sided ⼻ and bottom ⽌. The fact is widely attested in pre-Qin inscriptions or bamboo (wooden) slip recordings (third ...


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Taking up the chance to talk about "Unrelated readings" because I get the chance to talk about both Japan and China's phonologies in the past. It's well known that even amongst 音読み, there are the types from different Chinese regions and times. 漢音:Hanyin, from the original middle-chinese pronunciations 呉音:Wuyin from SE China (state of Wu) 唐音:Tangyin from ...


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In fact, it is perfectly normal that the 音{おん}読{よみ}み of a 漢{かん}字{じ} seem to be unrelated. Indeed, the 音{おん}読{よみ}み of the 漢{かん}字{じ} were imported from China at different period and from different regions. There are three kinds of 音{おん}読{よみ}み: 漢{かん}音{おん}: Spread by the monks who studied in Ancient China around the 7th, 8th century. 呉{ご}音{おん}: More ancient ...


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First, your example is likely a mistake for 二人の間がしっくり行かない The original is substandard, if not wrong. And yes, 「二人」is pronounced「ふたり」in this case. So, when is「二人」pronounced「ににん」? I don't think it's easy to come up with a simple set of rules, but at least if the sequence . . . 五人、四人、三人、二人 works down to 2, then it's pronounced「ににん」. For example, 「二人前」(two ...


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金 in 金曜日 refers to Venus (金星). In fact, "Fri" in "Friday" also refers to Venus, also known as Frige's star. Both are almost certainly derived from the Roman names for the days of the week.


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It's ふたり. You always use ふたり when indicating a group of two people or their relation. Note that you can use both ふたり and ににん when just counting people. One can tell 二人 in this sentence is not for counting number because of 間. It reads かん and means relation. 二人間: relation between those two 日米間: Japan-America relation 先生と学生間: between a teach and a ...



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