Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

According to a dictionary, 花つ月 is an alternative name for March, the third month of the year in the traditional Japanese calendar. (I didn't know that.) So 緋色の花つ月 means March in Crimson or something like that.


7

Out of interest, I did some statistics... see below for the resultng data. How I generated the data: kanji + readings taken from (a) ZIP codes place names, (b) jmdict, (c) wikipedia articles matched each kanji to a part of the reading by iterating over all possibilties for each kanji's reading in kanjidict and jmdict any の remaining that cannot be matched ...


6

When used alone, 樹【き】 is a literary expression mainly found in novels, lyrics and poems. For living trees, we use 木 in everyday writings. And probably 樹 is mainly used to refer to a large and grown tree. I feel one-meter high tree is less likely to be called 樹.


6

Since I have no knowledge of the subject, I am quoting from an academic paper: 日本・中国・台湾・香港の基礎漢字1945字字体一覧表の作成に向けて (香港中文大学日本研究学科、Senior Instructor、兒島慶治) According to the author of this paper, the number is 1,165. (See page 4.) Note that there were 1,945 [常用漢字]{じょうようかんじ} when this paper was written. Currently, that number has increased to 2,136. So, the ...


5

兼 in a labor chart means the person is 兼任 -- as in their official job is different, but this is being made one of their assignments as well. For instance, I work for the 国際課 at my university, but I'm a 兼 assigned to teach an English class for the English department.


5

If you want an ordering of 漢字 by themselves, each 漢字 dictionary will tell you what ordering they use for 漢字, as pointed out in the comments. As far as I can tell, this is usually very close (if not identical) to the Nelson system (which of course comes from the Kangxi dictionary of the 18th century). A total order on 漢字 would likely be unpractical, because ...


4

If it were 学生 without たち in the first sentence, I would probably interpret it as a single student, until "専門スタッフ3人と学生約20人" in the middle of the article. At that point, I would notice the ambiguity and probably think the article is poorly-written. I assume a 68-page book can be designed by a single college student who majors in design, so the plurality was ...


4

I am going to say that is mainly because it was newspaper article writing, which is expected to be rather precise by the general public. It is just not written the same way we speak. Even if 「たち」 had not been used, well over 90% of the readers would have understood it to be plural from the context. 90%, however, is not a good enough number for a ...


4

Although in some contexts 学生 can be plural (in fact the way you propose to change the sentence MAY be read that way), as both @istrasci and @dainichi stated, it could lead to confusion as it could mean either one or many students. Adding the たち confirms that it refers to more that one student and removes this ambiguity. デザイン専攻の学生が記念誌を作成した。 The ...


3

類 = 米 + 大 + 頁 類 = 米 + 犬 + 頁 Naturally, 犬 has one more stroke than 大, so that 類 has one more stroke than 類. The latter is a (常用外) variant of the former (but, as snailboat points out, is listed as 旧字体 variant in the 常用漢字表). The variant is also contained in the 人名用漢字 list.


2

(I think 中大兄皇子 was actually なかの おおえの みこ more precisely, なかつおほへのみこ [nakatu-opopeno-miko]) I believe they couldn't if it's off from common patterns just like people today. As for the examples above, I believe they could, because they are a pattern that naturally makes sense (中大兄皇子・三宮; さんみや wouldn't make sense) or a common pattern (班田収授法).


2

木 is the general term to design the tree in all its form. 樹 is a standing, living tree only. (emphases it is alive)


2

According to a Kanji dictionary 然 have two meanings. しかり、ただしい。肯定・是認の意を表す。 ある状態にある。その状態である意を表す。 First meaning is "right", or "correct". The second meaning is "something is at some status". In practical Japanese language, you usually don't use 然 alone, but you usually use with combination of other Kanji. Here is some examples.自然(nature, ...


2

The first contains 大 rather than 犬, hence one less stroke. They both mean kind/class/type, but I'm not familiar with the second Kanji. Googling it returns results as if I'd entered the first one.


2

[かしら]{頭} (the 漢字 is also read あたま) means "head" and ふゆがしら etc. refer to the top part of the component.


1

The Crimson "month of flowers". Or Crimson March.


1

It's true that 衝 is traditionally / generally considered as [ semantic 行 + phonetic 重 ]. However it is not always the case. For example [衡]{こう} ( as in 平衡, 均衡 ), which looks pretty much like 衝 in appearance, is believed to be from semantic [ 角 + 大 ] ( said to represent "a yoked ox" ) + phonetic 行. Similar cases can happen also with other radicals. For ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible