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12

Japanese elementary school children are generally taught to write kanji like this (教科書体): I don't know how these are different from how Chinese kids are taught to write these characters. However, this largely depends on the font, and adults actually handwrite these dots in many ways according to their preference. Practically, there is no strict rule ...


8

川 is the kanji used normally for "river". 巛 (まがりがわ) is a radical, like 氵(さんずい). When speaking about radicals, 川 and 巛 are said to be the same radical - radical 47, but only 川 is seen as both a radical and a separate kanji while 巛 is only seen as part of other kanji. For example, 山川 is a word where 川 is a whole kanji, and お巡りさん is a word with the 巛 radical ...


6

This kanji is 「うつ」, and it should appear in the kanji conversion list on Mac when you enter these kana. One of the most common words it appears in is [鬱病]{うつ・びょう}, which is the word for "depression". Another is [憂鬱]{ゆう・うつ} which also means "depression", "gloom", or "melancholy". The former is (I believe) the medical term for depression, while the latter ...


6

It's 鬱, which is read as うつ. See this entry from Wiktionary for details. IMEs can easily convert うつ into 鬱, but don't worry, I don't remember how to write this kanji by hand. Although it's a 常用漢字 since 2010, it's too complicated :-) I believe many native speakers are like me. Actually, this character is famous as an example of insanely complicated kanji. ...


6

馬鹿 is an ateji, which means either the readings of the individual kanji do not match the reading of the word, or the meanings of the individual kanji do not match the meaning of the word. In this case, it's the latter - why would an idiot be described as a horse and/or a deer? As for why these particular kanji were chosen to represent ばか, the etymology is ...


6

I think the meaning of あげる here is "bring up", as in "bring up a topic". So he is probably talking about some things he brought up earlier. その愛をもたない存在ー>その愛を持たない存在。「愛を持たない」 modifies 「存在」. This is called a subordinate verb clause. Sometimes writers like to play around with furigana to create special meanings of their own. They want you to read that word a ...


5

If a name can be read in several different ways there is no way to predict how it is read and the only reliable method is to ask the owner of the name. In the case you brought, it seems that the two reading you gave are the only ones in use according to this dictionary of names. However, the name you mention happens to be the name of a football player and ...


4

Almost nothing but the latter possibly reminds readers of the real 刺【とげ】 "thorn", or another reading of the kanji: 刺々【とげとげ】 "barbed". Although いらいら came from an old word いら that means "thorn", it's almost always written as 苛々 when merely means "annoyed; irritated". (But maybe more prevalent in katakana イライラ nowadays.)


3

To built up a bit on my comment (坐 is old school 座. Now, you might only see the former in books and museums (it's quite common to see 坐像{ざぞう}). May be there are nuances but I never heard of.) 語源-allguide has an entry on 座る. 【意味】 座るとは、膝を折り曲げて腰を下ろす。ある地位や役に就く。 【座るの語源・由来】 座るは、落ち着いて動かないことを表す「据わる(すわる)」と同源。 「居ても立ってもいられない」と言うように、古く、「立つ」の対義語は「居る」であった。 ...


3

坐る is very rarely used. I have seen it little. As far as I searched, 坐る was a Kanji for a verb, and 座 was a Kanji for a noun that means a place to sit in early Showa era. Though the government enacted the following rules in Showa 31th(1956). http://kokugo.bunka.go.jp/kokugo_nihongo/joho/kakuki/03/pdf/doon.pdf × 坐→座 It seems that they were unified into one ...


3

馬鹿 is also written as 莫迦. Based on 岩波書店’s 広辞苑, it was originally a Buddhist terminology derived from Sanskrit, either “moka –phonetically transcribed as 慕何 in Kanji” meaning ‘stupidity,’ or “mahaliaka – phonetically transcribed as 魔訶羅 meaning ‘ignorance’ - the source: 文明節用集 – Bunmei Glossary published in 文明6年(1474 ). The letter of 馬 is read and vocalized as ...


2

The on-yomi of this kanji, ち, is not used alone; it only appears in compounds such as 中央値【ちゅうおうち】 (median), 平均値【へいきんち】 (mean), 最頻値【さいひんち】 (mode), 真偽値【しんぎち】 (boolean value). If you just want to say value (of something) in mathematical/statistical/programming contexts, this kanji is always read as あたい.


2

鬱 is a rarely used kanji due to its complexity (I think this is the most complicated kanji in the jouyou list?), and it stands for depression, melancholia. Some words using it include: 鬱病 (うつびょう) clinical depression 陰鬱 (いんうつ) gloom, melancholy 憂鬱 (ゆううつ) dejection, gloom, depression Most of the time when you see this kanji it will be read with the ...


2

Regarding your questions (1),(2),(3), (1) “挙げた六句” means six haikus of 一茶 the writer quoted in the beginning of his article. (2)”弱い生命への愛の歌です。その愛をもたない存在(もの)への怒りの歌です” can be translated as; It’s the poem of love to be dedicated to the feeble and transient life. It is a poem expressing the anger directed to the soul who doesn’t have love and sympathy for the ...


1

There are other meanings as well, but here are the more confusing ones: 級 Level of difficulty. JLPT test difficulties used to be 4級 (lowest) to 1級 (highest). (Now they have been replaced by N5 to N1.) In this case, 級 means "level". See 級 in action in the table on page 3 of this 2009 JLPT results release document. Class (of seniority / ...


1

刺々 is read とげとげ and 苛々 and 刺々 are usually written in hiragana or katakana. いらいら means "disconcertedness, stew,and distraction etc" and it shows a one's emotion like so, for example, 私は、彼の無礼な態度にイライラした(I was stabby for his rude attitude.) とげ means spine and とげとげ means "acridly", for example, 彼の態度はトゲトゲしている(His attitude is acrid).



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