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8

幻影【げんえい】 / 幻【まぼろし】: Almost the same, except that the former being 漢語 and the latter being 和語. Some ghostly or dreamy things that may or may not exist. 「幻の大陸」 means a continent whose existence is not confirmed. 幻想【げんそう】: This comes off to me as "imagination", "fantasy" or "fiction" rather than "illusion". It's in titles of many comics and games, but we ...


7

No, the main character of Death Note might be the very first person with the name 月【ライト】 (although there is no way to confirm this). Of course no dictionary says "月" can be read as ライト. But in Japan, it is legal to name a person using simple kanji, and specify its readings freely. If they really wish, parents can ignore what kanji dictionaries say about ...


7

The official jōyō kanji chart lists 上{あ}がる and 明{あか}るい. It does not list 上{あが}る and 明{あかる}い. In other words, the latter two are not official ways to write these words. Of course, people don't always follow the official recommendations, and even today you'll find some variation in how people use okurigana, but I think you'll find in this case that the ...


5

I am not sure if there any traditions or rules regarding kanji lists, but usually when someone refers to a particular kanji it is called by its common use and the word it is in, without separating 訓読み from 音読み. Some kanjis have no 訓読み at all, some kanjis have a wide list of 音読み so it is very hard to distinguish which kanji are you referring to by calling ...


5

Usually, a common word like kaisha will only ever be written as かいしゃ instead of 会社 in these two cases: When accomodating for young children or non-Japanese speakers who might not be able to read kanji (yet). For stylistic/typographic purposes. For example, as part of an all-hiragana name of a company on a billboard. Just another way to stand out in an ...


4

I think learners should try to spend 99% of their time using the Japanese writing system and not romanization: Reading is a highly overlearned skill, and it takes absolutely huge amounts of practice to become literate in the Japanese writing system. Since learners have limited amounts of time, it's to their advantage to start using kana and kanji as early ...


4

I can't say anything authoritative about whether it has ever been used that way, but at least based on this site that lists unusual names, people seem to be very surprised that someone might actually use that name for someone. Outside the context of names I do not know of any prominent usages of it that way, however my knowledge is by no means exhaustive. ...


3

I think there are a few things in the same ballpark as 笑 worth discussing: (笑), which strikes me more as "Heh." than "lol"; 笑, which feels like "haha" or "lol"; w, which IMO doesn't really have a parallel in written English, but is the equivalent of smiling or slightly giggling while you say the sentence outloud; and ww[…], which feels like "hahaha[…]". ...


2

According to my dictionary, かいしゃ (hiragana) can mean either a company/corporation/workplace or a household word/universal praise. I'd stick with writing the word 会社 in kanji to be more specific and avoid any confusion. It's also good practice to get as much exposure to kanji as you can early on. It'll help you out big time when reading more advanced ...



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