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8

I am going to say that this is more a matter of personal preference than anything. I hate to disappoint the (many) kanji-lovers on here but 「ふるさと」 in kana would be the most-often used way to write the word. 「故郷」 may be used just as often but it is read 「こきょう」 instead at least half the time. 「古里」 looks pretty corny and you will not see it as often as you ...


7

The Online Kanji Etymology Dictionary has some rather terse notes on how these two meanings came to be. A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters (Henshall) describes its history as: Once written showing a boat 舟, a person 卩, and a hand 又. [...] The early meaning is known to have been work, and some scholars feel that it meant literally bend down in ...


7

The readings "kin" and "kon" are on-yomi pronunciations for 金. The "kon" reading is the older one (go-on 呉音) and "kin" is newer (kan-on 漢音). They ultimately stem from Middle Chinese /ki̯əm/; notice that 今 has the same on-yomi pronunciations. As a general pattern, go-on pronunciations are somewhat less common (relative to kan-on) in everyday words and more ...


5

Just to confuse things, there is a compilation series released by Columbia Records Japan that seem to use all 3 spellings (I assume deliberately). Although the original album used the spelling 故郷 so read into that what you will. I have mainly come across it as ふるさと personally. !


5

There is no hidden meaning in the 「見」 part of those verbs -- none. First, not that I think you are mistaken, I want to make sure that we are not discussing the kanji 「見」 here. Instead, we are discussing the 連用形 of the verb 「見る」, which only happens to be 「見」. 連用形 is the form of the verb that comes first in [複合動詞]{ふくごうどうし} , two-verb compound verbs, which ...


5

The site you've linked to is an interface to the dictionaries Jim Breen has put together using both his own resources (as I understand it he has a lot of dictionaries, including the Morohashi) and crowd-sourced submissions. It's the same data you'll find at WWWJDIC. In response to your questions: Neither source is wrong. They've just chosen to include ...


4

見殺し might be similar to 萌え殺し, 飼い殺し, 褒め殺し, 棄て殺し. I think it means 見ることによって、人を殺す, that is, 見る=殺す. 見捨てる might be similar to 見限る, 見切る and 見放す. Maybe, the 見 in these words more or less contains a kind of “passive” or “inactive” feeling, something like 面倒を見ていられないから、しかたなくやめる. As for the etymology, my hypothesis is 見 might mean “to experience” here. It seems that ...


4

As you suggested, by adding 見【み】 in 見殺し the implication is that you're standing by and watching it happen (read: not intervening). For 見捨てる【みすてる】 it's more along the lines of "get out of my sight" in English—someone is being cast out. Since the focus is on etymology and not simply defining things, however, let's take a look at others in this family: ...


4

An average Japanese person -- however that should be defined -- can indeed read an amount of 草書-style calligraphy, but it may not be a large amount because it is usually not taught in school. An average person as myself just picks it up from his exposure to handwritten Japanese around him like in his house, school and even on the street. He learns the 草書 ...


3

Two premises: Radicals are a method for indexing characters in dictionaries. As an element in other characters, the form 月 can represent 肉, 舟, 丹, and 月, among others. As you can see, these elements all look rather similar, so it's not surprising that historically they weren't always distinguished in form. So when you see a character containing what ...


3

Starting from zero I'm afraid there isn't, however once you have learned a couple dozen you'll start to notice phonetic elements that some characters have in common. For example: All the following are pronounced ドウ because they contain 同: 同、胴、銅、洞 All the following are pronounced チュウ because they contain 中: 中、仲、忠 All the following are pronounced チョウ ...


3

I'm just basically going to summarize the references from user3169. Until now I've never known that フケ can be written as 雲脂/頭垢. I don't think either form is common in ordinary use of the language, as it is normally written in Katakana. But at the same time they are clearly recognized well enough to be on Wikipedia. According to 語源由来辞典, 雲脂 is 当て字 that most ...


3

Why don't you post this question in Chinese Language Stack Exchange? Both 見 and 光 should be 会意. The 儿 parts are actually “人”. 風 is 凡+虫(animals, not insects). For some reasons, consonant endings “-m” and “-ng” in old Chinese were sometimes used interchangeably, so 風 and 凡 were homophones. Similarly 鳳 contains the 凡 part too. As for 花, 雪, 時, 島, etc. you can ...


3

It's a question about Chinese rather than Japanese. The word 服從 once appeared in Book of Rites (道合則服從,不可則去。Obey if you share the same idea, or else leave), and the meaning of clothes once appeared in ZhanGuoCe (朝服衣冠 put up clothes in the morning). Both of them were from Chinese thousands of years ago. According to this link, 服 meant to put shackles on ...


3

Thousands of 熟語s in Japanese are created in such a way. 岩石(がんせき) ≒ 岩(いわ) (rock) 河川(かせん) ≒ 川(かわ) (river) 絵画(かいが) ≒ 絵(え) (picture) 自己(じこ) ≒ 己(おのれ) (oneself) 身体(しんたい) ≒ 体(からだ) (body) I don't know the reason. That's how it is. EDIT: Japanese Wikipedia describes the simple reason. One kanji character was not long enough to be distinguishable with each other ...


2

Is there kanji for しか as in. 商品がひとつしかありません。 No. There is no kanji for this usage of しか. No evidence of a kanji for this しか can be found in any of the aggregated dictionaries: Weblio WWWJDIC goo


2

Even though there are some similarities and some rules that might help you to remember kanji (as pointed out by Kaji), they are not systematic. The way the on-reading has come to its present form from Chinese means that there are really no overall rules. See what works well for you but for me trying to remember any possible rules of kanji pronunciation was ...


2

校 isn't the character for "school", it's a character for "school". Here are some of the others: 塾, 学, 學, 宗, 斈, 泮, 黉, 院, 黌, ... Characters are not a neat logical mapping of one picture to one concept. In fact characters are not even Japanese, as I'm sure you know. Characters evolved over thousands of years in China. This means meanings changed, characters ...


2

At its core, the difference is that う is the 音読み, and thus is used in 漢語【かんご】 (words of Chinese origin). あめ and its related forms are 訓読み, and are used in combination with other readings of Japanese origin. Now to get into some specifics... Using あま あま is related to あめ, and is used when あめ appears at the front of a compound and a vowel shift is required. ...


2

The character 金 can refer the idea of gold, metal in general, or money. Most commonly, it is read as かね (kane, kun-yomi) and キン (kin, on-yomi) when occuring in compounds. There is also the コン (kon, on-yomi) reading which you mention. As Zhen Lin has pointed out, this is an older reading that is due to interaction between Japanese and Middle Chinese. ...


2

I'll quote part of Tokyo Nagoya's comment: I say it まいつき 100% of the time and hear others say it the same 99.99% of the time. So it seems that まいつき is the common reading. Other speakers corroborate this, with one saying that まいげつ is rare and another saying that まいげつ isn't even an acceptable reading—although I'm not willing to make that claim ...


2

This has an entry in the 異字同訓漢字の使い分け例. My answer will basically just be a quick translation and notes on that entry. 【堅い】中身が詰まっていて強い。確かである。 堅い材木。堅い守り。手堅い商売。合格は堅い。口が堅い。堅苦しい。 【固い】結び付きが強い。揺るがない。 団結が固い。固い友情。固い決意。固く信じる。頭が固い。 【硬い】(⇔軟らかい)。外力に強い。こわばっている。 硬い石。硬い殻を割る。硬い表現。表情が硬い。選手が緊張で硬くなっている。 堅 is for stuff that's strong or certain. Stiff, as you say, ...


1

I found it here. It appears to be a very formal word describing when two newlyweds have their first meal together. Given the lyrical content, though, it may be referring to this. 供膳 in this sense refers to a ritual where food is left for deceased ancestors. If the person singing is staring down death, this may be what it is. I am not totally sure either ...


1

it's two radicals drawn the same way. The radical for 肉 looks like 月 in most instances and the radical for 月 looks like 月 in all instances. The former radical means "flesh" / The latter means time. As to why they changed it, I don't know. Maybe it's just easier to write. But it is known which radical each character is using (and generally pretty obvious due ...


1

ではありません in your example sentence is a form of copula (である) and as such it is written using hiragana in modern Japanese. Words that are used in auxiliary way in the structure of the sentence are pretty much always written only using hiragana. There's also quite a lot of other words, including verbs, that are normally written using hiragana. "To be" verbs ある ...



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