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6

There are no character-level differences. Hiragana and katakana are, for all intents and purposes, the same, differing only in how they are used with regard to the broader idea of choice of system. You say you know what each is used for, so that's the key distinction you need to focus on. I think one thing we might be able to mention is elongated vowels. ...


2

Even though there are some similarities and some rules that might help you to remember kanji (as pointed out by Kaji), they are not systematic. The way the on-reading has come to its present form from Chinese means that there are really no overall rules. See what works well for you but for me trying to remember any possible rules of kanji pronunciation was ...


3

Starting from zero I'm afraid there isn't, however once you have learned a couple dozen you'll start to notice phonetic elements that some characters have in common. For example: All the following are pronounced ドウ because they contain 同: 同、胴、銅、洞 All the following are pronounced チュウ because they contain 中: 中、仲、忠 All the following are pronounced チョウ ...


6

Extensive use of hiragana by intent will make yourself look immature, childish, unserious, drowsy, cute, innocent, or sometimes less intelligent, depending on the context. A good but exaggerated example is found here. A very childish character in a game, who is always talking in hiragana. ...


4

It does indicate a more childish audience—or at least that you don't think they can read kanji. It also, interestingly, makes things much harder to read for those who know kanji—doubly so if you don't put spaces in between words or after particles. Hiragana can also be used in place of kanji at times to allow for the execution of Japanese puns in text as ...



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