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4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


7

I suppose this banner struck OP as "super bizarre" for either of the two reasons: Because you are a diligent Japanese learner who only learned how traditional textbooks say about when to use kanji or kana. Because you have a kind of fascination with kanji, as a design element. You regard kanji as cool, and kana as mere, dull, phonetic symbols. Whichever ...


6

It is most definitely an exception. The actual phonetic realisation of that series goes like this: は [ha] ひ [çi] ふ [ɸɯ~hɯ] へ [he] ほ [ho] In Middle Japanese they all were pronounced with [ɸ], which you can see in European transcriptions of names from the 1500s and 1600s - the Portuguese wrote e.g. <Faxecura> for a name that in Modern Japanese ...


2

I would say there's no one specific answer here. It's a stylistic choice, made by the designer based on the target audience and circumstances and cultural norms and expectations and/or the breaking down of same. The choice between kanji, hiragana and katakana is often an arbitrary one, and especially in advertising and design the choice is usually made on ...


3

"日本" is normally pronounced as ニホン/nihon at the present day. In this case, however, the flag designer is aiming at having audiences pronounce it as ニッポン/nippon explicitly. At international sport matches including football, Japanese supporter traditionally prefer "Nippon" for the cheering call, like "Nippon Cha-Cha-Cha" (c.f. ...



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