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9

Because Chinese doesn't have voiced consonants. In Chinese, voiced /b/d/g/ are just variants of their voiceless counterparts. So you can't hear the difference between voiced sounds and voiceless sounds. It's hard to explain and learn by text. Instead, I recommend you practice it by listening and imitating. The site 首都大学東京 mic-J 日本語教育 AV リソース may be ...


8

In this context, きれる does not mean "to be cut", but rather attaches to the 連用形 (-i form) of a verb and means "to be able to completely [verb]". cf. the EDICT entry for 切れる: (suf,v1) (16) to be able to do completely When used in this sense, きれる is typically written in kana rather than as 切れる. So, we have 死にきれる (that's the verb 死ぬ, not the noun 死 + ...


8

Extensive use of hiragana by intent will make yourself look immature, childish, unserious, drowsy, cute, innocent, or sometimes less intelligent, depending on the context. A good but exaggerated example is found here. A very childish character in a game, who is always talking in hiragana. ...


8

I suppose this banner struck OP as "super bizarre" for either of the two reasons: Because you are a diligent Japanese learner who only learned how traditional textbooks say about when to use kanji or kana. Because you have a kind of fascination with kanji, as a design element. You regard kanji as cool, and kana as mere, dull, phonetic symbols. Whichever ...


7

Yes, mixtures of this type are possible, and it's quite common with certain words. For example, 石鹸 has a rather difficult second kanji, and the word is often written 石けん instead. 轟音 is often written ごう音. And so on. In your example, none of the characters is particularly rare and all of them are on the 常用漢字表 (the official jōyō kanji chart), so ...


6

There are no character-level differences. Hiragana and katakana are, for all intents and purposes, the same, differing only in how they are used with regard to the broader idea of choice of system. You say you know what each is used for, so that's the key distinction you need to focus on. I think one thing we might be able to mention is elongated vowels. ...


6

It is most definitely an exception. The actual phonetic realisation of that series goes like this: は [ha] ひ [çi] ふ [ɸɯ~hɯ] へ [he] ほ [ho] In Middle Japanese they all were pronounced with [ɸ], which you can see in European transcriptions of names from the 1500s and 1600s - the Portuguese wrote e.g. <Faxecura> for a name that in Modern Japanese ...


5

I'm no expert in the history of the Japanese writing system so I'm going to be putting a lot of faith this chart and the idea in general that katakana are derived from small parts of larger kanji. This appears to be generally accepted though Japanese wikipedia notes opposition by one scholar. If we go by this chart, it's no coincidence that katakana ニ looks ...


4

It does indicate a more childish audience—or at least that you don't think they can read kanji. It also, interestingly, makes things much harder to read for those who know kanji—doubly so if you don't put spaces in between words or after particles. Hiragana can also be used in place of kanji at times to allow for the execution of Japanese puns in text as ...


4

I think that in elementary school stroke type (at least はねる) is definitely regarded an important part of learning kanji. For instance, the kanji 竹 is a first-year character and the hook on the last stroke is an important part. I think that most elementary schools would take marks off (i.e. not ◯ but △) for omitting the hook in a test. (The hook is even ...


4

People normally use consistent way of writing. I would say it's his style to mix 僕 and ぼく. When you use ぼく instead of 僕, the meaning doesn't change; however, the impression it gives to the reader is slightly different. It gives a somewhat childish, soft impression because hiragana is used. 「きみ」 sounds a bit more tender than 「君」 for the same reason. I guess ...


4

The first phonetic spelling of Japanese was using kanji. This system was called man'yōgana, named after the Man'yōshū, an anthology of poems from the Nara period written in this manner. Hiragana and katakana developed as abbreviated forms of these kanji. Although spelling wasn't entirely consistent, and multiple characters were used for individual ...


3

Starting from zero I'm afraid there isn't, however once you have learned a couple dozen you'll start to notice phonetic elements that some characters have in common. For example: All the following are pronounced ドウ because they contain 同: 同、胴、銅、洞 All the following are pronounced チュウ because they contain 中: 中、仲、忠 All the following are pronounced チョウ ...


3

Historically there were multiple way to write a word, and this wasn't standardized. For example, some very old documents contain both 直音表記 and ヤ行表記. This was subsequently standardized as 歴史的仮名遣い and then 現代仮名遣い. So, unless you are living in an ancient era you wouldn't use 直音表記.


3

"日本" is normally pronounced as ニホン/nihon at the present day. In this case, however, the flag designer is aiming at having audiences pronounce it as ニッポン/nippon explicitly. At international sport matches including football, Japanese supporter traditionally prefer "Nippon" for the cheering call, like "Nippon Cha-Cha-Cha" (c.f. ...


3

Kanji are supposed to be pronounced and their pronunciation is given in kana. This means that any word in kanji has a unique representation in kana. However, there are different words with the same kanji representation, e.g. 明日{あした} 明日{あす} 明日{みょうにち} Similarly, the same kana sequence can represent many different words. One good reason to use kanji here ...


2

I would say there's no one specific answer here. It's a stylistic choice, made by the designer based on the target audience and circumstances and cultural norms and expectations and/or the breaking down of same. The choice between kanji, hiragana and katakana is often an arbitrary one, and especially in advertising and design the choice is usually made on ...


2

Even though there are some similarities and some rules that might help you to remember kanji (as pointed out by Kaji), they are not systematic. The way the on-reading has come to its present form from Chinese means that there are really no overall rules. See what works well for you but for me trying to remember any possible rules of kanji pronunciation was ...


2

In usual handwriting, kana often turn out smaller than full-fledged kanji, especially kanji with many strokes. (Though practising writing both kanji and kana the same size is probably an important step towards achieving a nice balance between kanji and kana size.) Some fonts have comparatively small katakana, which I find very easy to read. This is from ...


2

This probably varies from person to person, at least a little bit, but generally each character should be approximately the same size as any others (i.e. full-width). If you don't, especially with katakana (which are formed from pieces of kanji), you can end up with situations where you cannot tell whether something is kana or kanji. For example メリ vs ...


2

The Japanese Wikipedia article at 同訓異字, specifically the 動詞の例 section, leads me to think that pitch accent isn't important for this term. The examples listed for the うむ (umu) reading, for instance, include 生む (ùmú, "to bear, to produce") with the flat heiban pitch pattern and 膿む (úmù, "to swell, to become swollen") with the high-initial atamadaka pitch ...


1

There's basically a one-to-one correlation between hiragana and katakana. The two main exceptions that I'm aware of are: in how long vowels are transcribed. For katakana, a dash-like element is preferred. For hiragana, the character for either o or u is used (often for historical reasons as the pronunciation of the long vowel sound for o is identical at ...


1

Not a native, however here are a couple of observations on my part between my learning experience and the semester of 書道 I studied when I was in Japan. 大丈夫 has always been a favorite example of mine to use for this topic, because I can't think of any other word in Japanese that composed of more similar, yet different, characters. The first two (大丈), in ...


1

There is a Wikipedia article (in Japanese) that describes how 仮名遣い evolved over the last 1000 years. And I found a page that describes there were people who tried to "standardize" (historical) 仮名遣い before 1946. 藤原定家【ふじわらのさだいえ】 was the first person who tried to standardize 仮名遣い in 下官集【げかんしゅう】 published in the 13th century. This was thereafter called ...


1

切れる【きれる】 can be used as a suffix to indicate an end to something. In this case, it's appended to 死に to form 死に切れる, which indicates that something ends when it dies.


1

I can think of two reasons. As stated by @NigoroJr, when children's language is being used, it is usually spelled with kana. For instance, in よつばと, everything the adults say is written in kanji, but everything Yotsuba (a four year old girl) says is written in kana (and bolded ones at that). The other thing is that, in certain grammatical forms, words are ...



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