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6

I think おかけで, かつと, and そしで are most plausibly explained as misprints. They don't generally occur, and this novel is too recent (written in 1987) to make comparisons to historical kana orthography. Although it's possible that バック too is a misprint, another explanation seems plausible to me in this case. In Japanese, a phenomenon called rendaku or ...


5

If we want an authoritative source, we could look at the official terminology used by the Japanese government as set out by the Agency of Cultural Affairs (文化庁) (might be familiar name to some people as their page about 二重敬語 gets referenced here sometimes). They start by saying only to use kanji from 常用漢字表・付表 in the normal form of the character. They go on ...


2

There's probably too many different reasons why カナ and 漢字 are used / not used in contemporary Japanese. I don't know all the rules, but I will mention two: (1) katakana are used when the 漢字 are considered too hard to write (癌 becomes ガン) and (2) grammatical uses of verbs, i.e. helping verb type uses do not use 漢字. × 出来る  ○ できる × 遊んで見る ○ 遊んでみる × 貰って下さる ○ ...


1

It's not. It's often written in kanji and what you are seeing may just be coincidences. Of course it doesn't have to be, and there are times when it's not, but this doesn't mean that it's "typically" written without kanji. I do not believe that there is any difference in nuance between choosing to use kanji and choosing not to. It's possible that using only ...



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