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19

First, 大金 = 【おおがね】 or 【たいきん】, not 【だいきん】. Second, as @nkjt said in a comment above, this 〜上 is the one meaning, "from the viewpoint/standpoint of 〜". A very common one you'll see in a lot of places is 安全上の注意 ("safety precautions" -- I used to see this under the lids of those fancy toilets). So 金銭上 would mean "from the standpoint of money", or put more ...


17

True fluency is rare, and involves more than passing a standardized test. I will refer you to an answer I gave in EL&U.SE which I quoted from my treasured copy of Jack Seward's Japanese in Action. He is talking about Japanese, but I removed all the specific-language references because it's a good measure for fluency in any language. EDIT: I've just added ...


13

Expanding on @TsuyoshiIto's comment above, がる basically turns an イ-adjective (or "words which conjugate like" them, as he states) into a verb. Essentially means "acting this way" or "behaving in such a way": 寒【さむ】がる → To be cold (さむがり: a person who is always cold -- like me); "acting that you are cold" 怖【こわ】がる → To be afraid of something; "behaving ...


12

尻をたたく is an idiom, sort of like English "kick in the pants". Consider: My lazy little brother never does any work until someone gives him a good kick in the pants. You wouldn't interpret this as literal brutality, just forceful reminding/urging. Same goes for 尻をたたく, at least in this case, and you can tell because of context: it just seems really ...


12

First and foremost the JLPT does not have a speaking component. This means you may be able to recognise and understand grammar when reading or listening, but you may be unable to actually speak the language with any proficiency. This is my case exactly, I can understand far more than what I can express. Secondly, the entire test is multiple choice. Multiple ...


10

They have pretty much different meanings. 中心に adds blur. It means centered around. めぐって means 'regarding', and implies some kind of a debate. They are in general not interchangable. 駅を中心に沢山の商店が集まっている 'many stores are gathered around the the station' More literally: 'many stores are gathered with its center being the station' 駅をめぐって沢山の商店が集まっている ...


10

WWWJDIC writes しいて (adv) as 強いて "by force". In your sentence, しいて食べる is roughly equivalent to 無理して食べる, i.e. overdoing it in some way. A more literal translation might be 食べたくなければしいて食べることないから、食べられるものだけ食べてね。 If you don't want to eat anything, don't force yourself (to eat) and just eat as much as you can/want.


9

AしてBしませんか sounds to me like "Let's do A and B", whereas AしてからBしませんか sounds to me like "How about doing A before doing B?" Compare: 映画に行って食事しませんか。・・・asking out to the movies and dinner 映画に行ってから食事しませんか。・・・asking out to the movies (going out to dinner has been agreed). OR, suggesting going to the movies BEFORE dinner, rather than AFTER. Likewise, ...


8

のに can have several meanings, "despite" being the most common one. But it can also mean "in order to" (~のため)。Here are some examples (taken from here http://www.jgram.org/pages/viewOne.php?tagE=noni-2): パスポートは海外旅行に行くのに必要です。 A passport is necessary to travel abroad. 電子レンジは冷めた料理を温めるのに重宝だ。 A microwave is handy to heat up cold food.


8

Axioplase's answer to the question you linked expresses the nuance. っぽい: '-ish'. Can be used for an attribute, or resemblance. 黒っぽい車 [attribute] 'a blackish car' 霊{れい}柩{きゅう}車{しゃ}っぽい車 [resemblance] 'a hearse-ish car' みたい: 'like'. Can be used for resemblance, but not for an attribute. × 黒みたいな車 [attribute]  'a car that is like ...


8

SUMMARY Options 3 & 4 both mean "must not" because they are both variations on べきではない tested at JPLT N1 (in fact べからざる is a variation on べからず (see on)). The trick is to understand which best fits the context of the sentence when we apply "usual" JLPT level N1 definitions but even if we do not fully understand the context we can still get the question ...


7

Using the Microsoft IME as a guide, generally 延びる seems to be used as "extend" and 伸びる as "grow": 延びる: Extend a conversation Extend a schedule Extend life span Extend a subway into the suburbs 伸びる: Plants/people grow Expand investigations (in relation to the law etc) Grow one's knowledge Grow a market/earnings


7

I suspect it's the nominalizer の, making the noun phrase "...温めるの". Then the 'directional/intention' particle に is appended, giving intention towards which the 電子レンジ can be considered 重宝. This can be occasionally tricky to sort out from the "in spite of" usage, but it is an alternate parse to be aware of.


7

故{ゆえ} appears to mean many different things depending on the way it's used, but the main definition seems to be "reason". ゆえの: "by reason of (being)", "due to (being)" or "because of (being)". Whether to add or omit "being" can only be determined by context: 女性ゆえの差別 "discrimination by reason of being a woman." 有名人ゆえの苦労 "hardships by reason of ...


7

Just because one of the figurative meanings of "cut" in English is "to reduce in number", doesn't mean that the same applies to 切る in Japanese. That is simply not one of the figurative meanings of 切る. 切るdoes have many figurative meanings, however. One is "fall below" for prices, times, numbers etc. Another is to "lay off, fire". When used in this sense, ...


7

In additions to what @sawa said, I think it's easy to keep straight if you remember the verb めぐる has the meanings of "going around" or "surrounding". Thus, ~をめぐって/~をめぐり/~をめぐる usually has at least a slight negative meaning (as @sawa stated) usually about some debate, controversy, etc. Here are a couple examples. (I'm going to expand on one of @sawa's ...


7

The ~て form can be used to chain sentences together. That is, any two sentences can be made into one by changing the verb of the first sentence into its ~て form. The result can be translated with the conjunction and and means that the first sentence happens and then the second. In your case きのうはうちにかえりました。何をしましたか。 Yesterday you went home. What did you ...


7

The key to the first one is in the fact that it all comes down to ~ほどじれったいものはない. It is a negative sentence, but it's not negating the meaning of the sentence. If we put it into English it means "There's nothing as frustrating as seeing people give up on things before they start." And that's if we use the book's translation for the rest of it. The point is ...


7

沸く refers to the simplest act of a liquid boiling. It is an intransitive verb and just means that something (water) is heated up and usually boils (note the kanji in 沸騰{ふっとう}). Its transitive form is 沸かす. You can see it additionally in words like 湯沸{ゆわ}かし器{き}, or water heater. For example: お湯が沸く, 湯を沸かす. 沸く has an additional nuance of heightened emotion. 茹でる ...


7

わたしの父は中国語も英語も話せます。 My father can speak both Chinese and English. ~も~も is how you say "both ... and ..." in Japanese. It works with all particles, as も does by itself, i.e. usually replaces は, が, を and follows へ, に, etc. It also works with more than two も's, e.g. わたしの父は中国語も英語もドイツ語も話せます。 My father can speak (all of) Chinese, English and German. ...


7

The correct answer should be 1-4-2-3. You have probably seen the common structure "〜〜という + Noun" before. 「と」 is a quotative particle so you have a good choice in #4 with quotation marks to precede it. So, we have a 4-2 for a start. The only choice that starts with a noun is #3, making a 4-2-3 an sure bet already. The only thing you now need to think ...


6

A non-academic, franc distinction is that "領域" means 'area' without particular connotation of possession. It is normally used in mathematics like "閉曲線Cの囲む領域の面積を求めよ" 'give the area surrounded by the closed curve C'. "領土" specifically means 'territory land of a country' and has clear mentioning of possession. In this case it is the best answer.


6

The order of learning words and kanji for Japanese schools and JLPT are completely uncorrelated. Which is to say that the JLPT doesn't attempt to emulate learning as Japanese people do. So while there is some overlap in the sense that both groups generally follow a principle of going more simple to more complex, what a non-native learning Japanese will find ...


6

死んだつもりになって is a set expression that means to frantically 頑張る (and maybe even with reckless abandon and power). If my understanding is correct, it has a really great flavor. I wouldn't say it's interchangeable with 必死に, but I think it's safe to say they have similar nuances. Sources (girlfriend and Weblio)--> その例文はな。。。もう今からしても遅いかもやけど、死に物狂いになって頑張れば大丈夫かも、です。笑 ...


6

Both Xに関する and Xに関わる have the overlapping meaning when it comes to 'concerning or related to X'. However when you see XがYに関わる or Yに関わるX it is probably better than 関する when X is something that directly affects Y, or is something that Y is dependent upon. Also, there is the nuance that Y is a big or serious thing such as education, peace, life. For example ...


6

The difference is purely syntactic, in my opinion. べからざる is the attributive form (連体形) of べからず, so one expects a noun after it; but in the sentence you have given, the blank calls for a predicate, so for syntactic reasons, the only viable choices are べき (but べきだ or べし, strictly speaking) and べからず. Semantics rules out べき, so the only possible answer is べからず.


6

It is used when a person has some expectation of what the outcome of the situation will be, but somehow the outcome has been failed to meet his/her expectations in such a foolish way. Using the examples that Tim has provided, I thought she is going to show up to meet me, but she didn't and I had waited for almost an hour now. I'm going home. fool of ...


6

範囲 establishes a beginning and end point and is used to show the extent or limit to something. That's why it is most appropriate for the first one, as it establishes the extent of the test (although 17課まで seems like a very difficult test...). 領域 and 分野 are similar and can overlap. For example, 専門領域 and 専門分野 can both be used. However, there is a difference ...


5

尻をぶつ: Means to spank someone as punishment for something which has been done (in the first case because of naughtiness.) 尻をたたく: Means to give someone a good hiding without those connotations (in that case because of laziness.) 打つ: Doesn't work because ぶつ is used for people and 打つ for inanimate things. 殴る: Doesn't work because it's more ...


5

You need to translate the sentence in your head before you decide which answer you're going to pick (if you're not entirely sure). First read it without the gap filled in and try to guess what it wants to say. The example sentence here approximately wants to say "It looks as if it's going to rain tomorrow." The information of "looks as if" is already ...



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