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19

It is worth pointing out that in Japanese, different dialects use different accent patterns for the same word. The Japanese language taught as a foreign language is most likely to be 標準語 (ひょうじゅんご), which is based on the Tokyo dialect. Therefore, probably the “correct” accent pattern to use should be that of the Tokyo dialect (as in your examples of はし). ...


13

It is actually very much the same as homonyms in English. Consider the difference between refuse |riˈfyoōz| and refuse |ˈrefˌyoōs; -ˌyoōz|. It sounds weird if you mix up the pronunciation: I |ˈrefˌyoōs| to accept this. It's bad English and identifies you as a non-native speaker. If the context doesn't give enough hints as to which refuse you meant, it ...


10

Two pointers : Yoko Hasegawa, Against marking accent locations in japanese textbooks, Japanese-Language Education Around the Globe. 柴田{しばた} 武{たけし}・柴田{しばた} 里程{りてい}, アクセントは同音語{どうおんご}をどの程度{ていど}弁別{べんべつ}しうるか ---日本語{にほんご}・英語{えいご}・中国語{ちゅうごくご}の場合{ばあい} (Is Word-Accent Significant in Differentiating Homonyms in Japanese, English and Chinese?) Abstract : To ...


7

It's still understandable without correct accents, most of the time, but if you were able to use the correct intonation, then you would gain better fluency in Japanese obviously. I sometimes check at this site to check the the correct accents. For example for that chopsticks「箸」, and bridge「橋」


7

First of all, knowing pitch is not as simple as knowing the pitch on each word. There are many morphological endings that make pitch change on verbs and adjectives. For instance, taBEru becomes TAbete because -te will make the pitch shift to the 3rd mora from the end when the verb has pitch. Pitch also changes when 2 words or more form a new compound word ...


6

The NHK pronunciation dictionary prescribes that: 付く, 着く, (羽根を)撞く, (職に)就く, (嘘を)吐く, (位に)即く, (明かりが)点く, and (餅を)搗く all have the accent on the first or second mora (with first preferred: HL) 突く has no accent (so in isolation it is LH, but note that this is not the same as accent-on-the-second-mora LH when other words follow) Hope this helps!


5

In Nagoya, ありがとう is pronounced as LHLLL (see below), where L and H mean low and high pitches, respectively. I think that this is the same in Tokyo, too. Correction: According to the publisher webpage on the book アクセントの法則 by Haruo Kubozono, the accent pattern of the word ありがとう is as follows: Tokyo: LHLLL Nagoya: LLHLL Osaka: LLLHL Kagoshima: ...


4

You will be perfectly understood even if your pitch isn't "good". In cases where there is an ambiguity, people will either infer the intended word or just ask for clarification. If you want to learn a pitch, you can buy pitch dictionaries like this one.


4

It's just typical for entertainers who want to capture the attention of the audience. It's not even unique to Japanese. When you take the English one in Disney World (Florida) they talk the same way. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QtDKnYCTIh0 The guide in this one does the same thing in English, if not quite as often. On the rides I've been on, some ...


2

There is no word ま that matches your description. The interjection you hear is probably まあ or まっ. It expresses a surprise rather than indignant tone. まあ/まっ、何ということでしょう。古びた馬小屋が、匠の手で見事なうさぎ小屋に生まれ変わりました。 There is also まあ/まっ which is a filler (and sometimes compensates a potentially bad situation), something like the English "well". ...



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