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23

Thanks to @Chocolate, I was able to learn what this word means, which is roughly that something was funny. Here are a couple sources: http://wikiwiki.jp/himoteplus/?%C1%F0%C0%B8%A4%A8%A4%BF http://www.logsoku.com/r/livejupiter/1340676537/ Why does it mean something was funny? Well, as discussed in this question, strings of w (such as wwwwww) express ...


18

I believe the following theory, but I have never tried to back them up with an evidence: It originates from a slang 中坊 (ちゅうぼう). It means “junior high student,” but often with an indication that the speaker looks down on the student he/she is talking about. (The usual word for “junior high student” is 中学生.) On a BBS, calling someone 中坊 would be just ...


17

As you can see from these references: http://netyougo.com/twitter/1652.html http://www.paradisearmy.com/doujin/pasok_8888.htm Streams of the number eight such as 8888 represent applause. They're read パチパチ, the sound of hands clapping together one after another in applause, as in the phrase パチパチと拍手する. The second reference above also explains the derived ...


14

It is an internet slang, not a standard Japanese word. 情弱 (joojyaku) is short for 情報弱者 (joohoojyakusha) 'information shortfall', people who are left behind by the advancement of information technology. 乙 (otsu) comes from お疲れさま (otsukaresama) literaly '(you are) tired (after the hard work)', in this case ironically and looking down. Close to the ...


14

It's not clear exactly who or what started it on twitter, but なう does indeed come from the English "now". It became popular in 2009, shortly after the release of twitter (according to this site). Here are some Japanese articles exploring the usage: http://nanapi.jp/258/ http://zokugo-dict.com/21na/nau.htm http://www.paradisearmy.com/doujin/pasok_now.htm


10

In colloquial speech, 「あるある」 is basically a way to respond to questions like "Have you ever noticed how the more busy Jack gets, the more he sweats". あるある means something like "Yeah, I recognize that situation" or "Yeah, I've been thinking about that too" or "Yeah, I have noticed that". One meaning of ネタ is 'humorous material' or 'joke material'. There's a ...


9

Perhaps this site may be of use to you. For each section there is a brief description and explanation of the choice of symbols/characters used. The characters used for kaomoji may represent: Eyes (usually obvious)(may be covered by arms/hand) Ears (may be absent) Nose (may be absent) Mouth ( ∀ and ▽ in your examples are mouths) Limits of the face ...


8

It is an onomatopoeia, not the name for an object unless the author/speaker uses it as such for his own aesthetic purposes but this would be fairly rare. It describes the way a long object dangles, stretches, lies down, etc. in a lazy manner. The long object coud actually be anything from linguini to a cat stretching its body, from hair to stretching ...


7

Probably, it is short for [不]{ぶ}[細]{さい}[工]{く} 'ugly' + [可]{か}[愛]{わい}い 'pretty'. It may sound contradictory, but the direction of the two properties point to slightly different angles, and the positive one somehow out wins the negative property. Realizing that you mention it was used in a pet magazine, I think it typically refers to the face of a bulldog or ...


7

Chiebukuro says that 情弱乙(じょうじゃくおつ)is short for 情報弱者. What is a 情報弱者? Chiebukuro has you covered again; it refers to a person on the wrong side of the digital divide, someone whose access to the internet is severely limited or nonexistent. It can also refer to someone who is out of touch with current events, or as an insult to someone who has asked a ...


6

There are multiple ways "Moe" or 「萌え」can be used. 「萌え萌え」as a mimetic word (擬態語) like Ignacio's link in the comment. 「萌え!」as an interjection (感嘆詞) 「妹萌え」as a prefix (接尾辞) In this example someone has a fetish/attraction/affection/情熱/欲望 towards little sisters. 「萌える」as a verb as well. For example, 「あなたは(私から見て)萌える」 Either way you can attach 萌え to almost ...


6

I claim against Amadan's answer. I think it is rather identical to the form that attaches to らしい. The difference from ところ appears when you have a noun or a na-adjective. The latter takes the attributive form. verb 食べるらしい 食べるなう 食べるところ i-adjective 寒いらしい 寒いなう 寒いところ na-adjective 静からしい 静かなう 静かなところ [Different form] noun ...


5

Twitter came from the US, so I'd argue that original Japanese twitter-ers picked it up from the English feeds that they followed. Additionally, "now" is common enough of a word that most Japanese know it in English, even if they don't speak English fully, so I reckon it just caught on like that.


5

I would assume that with verbs, the form would be identical to ところ: 楽屋【がくや】にいるところだ 終【お】わったところだ 寝【ね】てるところだ where いる、〜ている forms indicate a present continuous state (I'm X-ing at the moment, I'm X-ing right now), past 〜た indicates recent completion (I've just X-ed), while the non-past indicates imminent action (I'm just about to X). (I don't know whether ...


5

Well in English Twitter doesn't use the word "Post" but "Tweet". Twitter's translator decided to make it an equivalent word that would make sense to someone who had never heard of it before. Check out this J article covering the use of フォローする and つぶやく. http://www.itmedia.co.jp/news/articles/0907/29/news054.html


5

On the 3rd Google page I have found this blog post that has more information: 僕が言ってもそうなんだけど、最近いわゆる「おま言う」が多すぎて。 テレビ見てたり、文章読んでたり、はたまたツイッターの書き込みを覗いたり。 この世には「おま言う」、つまり「お前が言うな」が多すぎて、僕も出来るだけそう思われない生き方をしなくちゃならないなと思った。 So おま言う is the abbreviation of お前が言うな. Thanks to oldergod for pointing out that the meaning is: 'shut up, you are not in position to say ...


5

It is now clear that 煜 was never intended to mean anything related to the kanji. In that sense it is a typo introduced by reading a 携帯 message on a computer. I did find an alternative to the banana hypothesis, though: 煜 maps to the smiley face (:D) on the SoftBank iPhone. (Helps if you have "accessibility" tools for people with impaired eyesight installed.) ...


4

According to a very similar online discussion, @Darius and @Earthling are on the right track. 煜 is a non-keitai rendering of the "banana" emoji. As for "Why banana?", this brief online chat suggests there's no literal meaning. Rather, it's for atmosphere, replacing the closing ○ mark with something brighter. Cheers.


3

Great research! Well, literal (笑) someday changed into 'w' especially in 2ch and such, and some people don't like ones who uses too many of them, like, ちょっwwwwwwwwwww, (this must be like "hey, wait a minulollollollollol") and they started saying 草生えすぎ, or using the AA you put above, frowned (・ω・) mowing the lawn. So now they also use 草生えた just instead of ...


3

According to Wikipedia, That translation is done by 枝洋樹 and the English word "Tweet"'s direct translation to Japanese is さえずる but it is mainly used for birds. He thought that closest one for human would be つぶやく.


3

Can this word amount to a form of sarcasm? Yep. Here is a typical use 「中国製2万円ガイガーカウンターの“高性能”に専門家苦笑」. Here is an example in spoken language: A: これで年金は100年安心なんだってさ B: ほんと苦笑{にがわら}いするしかないなぁ Usually in spoken language, you pronounce it as にがわらい probably because it's harder to misunderstand, but the internet abbreviation ((苦笑)) is usually ...


2

I don't know for certain, but 「ナウい」(and later「ナウな」) was a trendy slang word beginning in the 70's or so. (It is no longer trendy, and is in fact now very dated, so don't try using it to sound cool. :) So there was already a precedence for this word. Wikipedia article



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