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14

もしもし is used to call for someone’s attention. Although it is often used on the phone, the use is not limited to phone calls. もしもし is a repetition of もし, which is also used to call for an attention. もし is a variation of 申し (もうし), which was used in the same way in old time. 申し definitely predates telephones, and I guess that both もし and もしもし for asking for ...


11

脳裏 and 目の奥 are often used with 焼き付く as in 脳裏に焼き付いた。 and are referring to an event, which has been etched into your brain or onto the back of your eyes. Hence, the latter is used for visual impressions, whereas the former can be used for any type of impression. Both are strong impressions, which are unforgettable. 頭の隅 corresponds to the back of your ...


10

俗語辞書(ぞくごじしょ) (slang dictionary) says that that word was formed because of the radio program called 社会の窓(しゃかいのまど) around 1948-1960, which tried expose anything about society/community. And people start to called zip fasteners 社会の窓, because it is a hidden place for men. Also when zip fasteners are opened in any place other than the toilet, they called it ...


10

According to jisho.org 洗い出す means "to reveal by investigation". Hope this helps.


10

I applaud your courage to try something new and more sophisticated, when you can so easily use some safe & mandane expressions like お久しぶり! Unfortunately, things like this entirely depend on the context and what your perceived character is to the other person, for there's always some context in which almost any expression is appropriate. For example, if ...


10

For my money, 「はい、どうも」 just can't be beat. What's that? Too informal, you say? Far from it, my good man. 「はい、どうも」 isn't a replacement for よろしく or 宜しくお願いします when you're winding down the conversation. But there's always that awkwardness that sets in - happens in English, too - when you and the person on the other end are saying conversation-ending-phrases ...


10

The ただいま that you say when you arrive home is a contraction of ただ今帰りました. (ただ=たったjust / 今=now / 帰りました=(I) came back/came home /returned) I think one other situation you're talking about might be where you say 'ただいま', 'Certainly, sir'/'Yes sir, I'll do that right away'/'Yes, I'll be right with you' etc., when someone tells you to do something or calls you, ...


9

阿月地区を東西二つに分けて means "separate the Azuki district into two parts, east and west". You could insert a の, making it 東西の二つ, but the adverbial use without it is not uncommon for these "listing"-jukugo like 東西, 優劣, 大小 etc.


9

This may be close to that phrase: 話{はなし}半{はん}分{ぶん}に聞く 話半分 denotes where roughly half of what is said is a truth, and half is a falsehood or exaggeration according to Daijirin. Another similar phrase may be 割り引いて聞く, which means something similar to "discount some of what somebody says". See also Space ALC for more expressions.


9

As you correctly understood, よりを戻す is an idiom meaning for a broken couple to get back together. [縒]{よ}る means “to twist threads together to make a thicker string.” [縒]{よ}りを戻す literally means to undo this process and turn a string into several threads apart. This may sound like the opposite of getting back together (certainly it does sound like the ...


9

乗り切る doesn't quite fit here because it's about enduring through a hardship. With 乗り切る, wave(s) of difficulties come and go while you persevere, where as in "get over it," you need to overcome it yourself. 乗り越える, 克服する and 打ち勝つ do have the sense of actively overcoming some obstacle, and may work if you use it together with the right noun. I'll come back to ...


8

It is relatively gentle, and a good way of allaying fears or dispelling misconceptions. お邪魔みたいですので、これで失礼しますね… It seems like I'm interrupting you, so I'll see myself out... そんなこと(は)ないですよ Not at all! / Don't be silly! / No such thing! かなり怖い人だそうですけど… I heard he's quite a scary person... そんなことない Not at all. If by your last question you mean can ...


8

According to the Wikipedia article for 虫: 体内の架空、仮想の生物の意味で用いるもの。Used for the meanings of "imaginary inside the body, imaginary creatures": 三尸{さんし}の虫: A 庚申{こうしん} belief originating from Taoism from China that inside the bodies of humans there are three bugs. 虫の知らせ: A premonition. As if given a prediction by the inner-body "bugs", a feeling about ...


8

Is there a phrase, idiomatic or otherwise, to convey a "window of opportunity"? As you may have noticed, in English, "window" conveys a period of time, that is why you can say "launch window" and "window of opportunity". To convey "window of opportunity” in Japanese, there are several phrases that come to mind: 好機到来 絶好の機会 今がチャンス ※Side ...


8

It means 'replacement'. What is being replaced is the content, not the container. You can use a related expression 替え in a wide variety of replacements. Mostly in Kyusyu area, when you go to a noodle shop, you can ask for 替え玉, which is (a ball of) replacement noodle that fills in your empty bowl still with leftover soup. 替え芯 means a replacement lead for a ...


8

豆腐の角に頭をぶつけて死んでしまえ。 Used to say that a person is so stupid (that he would believe this and real find a piece tofu to die). (source) ...の爪の垢を煎じて飲む。 Use the dirt under the nail of ( some expertise ) as a drug, (you'll get some of his talent). (source) 名人の爪の垢を煎じて飲めば少しは腕が上がるだろうに It'll be hard to make any sense out of them if you see them alone. ...


7

This is where the status of a word is murky. It is unsettled between a na-adjective and a noun. However, probably most of the cases where you found "色色の" come from some old people. It has an archaic flavour. In addition, "色色" does not take any other case markers in present-day oridinary conversation like: "色色が" or "色色を"; it should not allow genitive "の" as ...


7

I feel like 電話をかける is more formal when writing. And there is 電話のかけ方 (How to make a call) but I don't think people use 電話し方. But of course there is Keigo usage like お電話させていただきます, 電話する would be more popular.


7

I don't know Chinese histroy but my Japanese dictionary says that during Han Dynastry at China, they defined the system that right side of the place (eg., for seat) is for higher rank. And Japanese just follow it.


7

Neither of the current answers sit well with me at the moment, so I'm going to risk adding to the confusion by posting another. Question 1 (grammar) First, let's clarify the two verbs in question: 解く solve (a problem) 解ける resolve (itself) (These are not the only definitions, but for the sake of brevity and on-topic-ness we'll go with these.) ...


7

How about something like 「絶対なんて絶対にない」? It has the same self-contradictory nature as the English original, and seems to have some use as well. The meaning is slightly different, however. You could also go with something like 「ありえないなんてありえない」 or something...


7

All in all it takes 15 minutes to get there 全部で15分かかる。 (more examples of this structure) All in all this movie was quite fun この映画は全体的におもしろかった。 (more examples, more examples, more) This dictionary might help as well. It includes some useful phrases like 全体として見れば.


6

It randomly occurred to me today that while these are indeed similar in meaning, they are not always interchangeable. If you're talking about making a call to someone/somewhere, either can be used: 事務所に電話する call the office 事務所に電話をかける call the office But 電話する can also be a joint action. Consider the following: 彼氏と電話する talk on the phone with ...


6

Within relevant contexts, 受ける means 'to attend' whereas 取る means 'to be registered for'. If you are unofficially attending a class, you should use the former. If you are officially registered but tend to be absent, you should use the latter. Formal ways of saying it are 受講する 'to be registered for', 聴講する 'to be registered as a non-full time student for'.


6

すます is 澄ます without the kanji, and it means "to clear, to purify". 耳をすます【みみをすます】is a set phrase, listed in the dictionary in its complete form, meaning to listen carefully. You can think of すます, then, in this context, as meaning to clear out your ears so as to listen better.


6

According to this page, there are a few possibilities. The answer that received the highest votes says that In China and other south Asian countries, and in Bhuddist and Islamic cultures, the left hand is the one you use to wipe yourself with after using the bathroom, and so the left is associated with dirtiness. It also goes on to say that dioramas with ...


6

It's related to the Han dynasty. A quick search on Japanese sites give the following explanations: "It was customary at that time to order the people by rank, starting from right to left (and putting the emperor in front). When you messed up something, you were to be seated at a place more on the left than before. This is what is called sasen." (Sasen, 左遷 ...


6

だがたまには下も見るもんだぜ だがたまには下も見るものだぜ In this context ~もんだ is a slightly more informal way of saying ~ものだ, which is similar to ~べきだ as covered in this post. So the speaker is trying to say that 'one should...(look down etc.)' For better flow of the translation I would personally translate it as follows: A: There is always someone above you in this world. ...


6

As your hunch says, this expression means "for dummies" in the sort of "explained simply" meaning used principally for instructional materials, much like the line of books in English. It seems predominantly to be used with サル with some mentions of 猫. There are some other kind of punny ones for pandas and dogs and sheep. It doesn't appear to be connected with ...



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