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7

The expression 「[目]{め}を[細]{ほそ}める」 (with 目, not [眼]{め}) already has two meanings to begin with. Literal: "to squint" Figurative: "to smile in delight (at the sight of something/someone one is fond of)" Which one it means should be clear from the context as the two meanings are quite different from each other. However, some people would choose to ...


7

Yes you are right, 匂い and 香り is always for good smells like from flowers, food, etc, whereas 臭い is mostly for undesirable smells. But sometimes 臭い is neutral, which case I think your example falls into. BTW that jisho.org page you cited seems to be a little confusing, because it lists [臭]{にお}い (noun) and [臭]{くさ}い (adjective) jumbled together. So, just be ...


6

The verb 「みる」("look"/"see"/"watch") is one case of a word which can be written with one commonly-used general-purpose kanji, and sometimes with other rarer, more specific kanji. The general-purpose kanji writing is 「見る」. Any time you use 「みる」, you can be confident that you can write it 「見る」 and it will be correct (as long as it's a verb which means anything ...


5

Indeed there are very many words like this, but here is my favourite example. Consider the following statement about a choir: 女声は下手、男声は上手! It might mean that the men are more skilled than the ladies (reading the characters as [下手]{へた}・[上手]{じょうず}) but actually more likely tells them which side of the stage to come on from ([下手]{しもて}・[上手]{かみて}).


5

There are a number of words like this. The most obvious one that comes to mind is 方, which can be read かた (polite "person") or ほう ("alternative", perhaps). Another example is 青山, which can be read あおやま ("a lush mountain") or せいざん ("a lush mountain" OR [metaphorically] "where one dies"). Also 心中, which can be read しんちゅう ("one's heart" or something like that) ...


5

Better use kana instead of some weird or wrong kanji if you're not certain In natural languages, the meaning of words are often extended, changed and modified to fit the speakers needs. Just look up some basic verbs in an English dictionary. When two of these meanings are far enough apart, we can call it two separate words, and it makes sense to use a ...


4

My favorite example is この先生きのこるには. It was originally posted in a net forum, and was intended to be read as このさき、いきのこるには (how to survive longer). But many native speakers have misread this as このせんせい、きのこるには (how does this sensei mushroom(?)), even though there is no such verb as きのこる. This sounded so funny that it soon became a piece of net slang, and ...


3

Adding on to oals' answer: 仕舞う to finish; to close; to do something completely; to put away; to put an end to Common word, Godan verb with u ending, Transitive verb, Usually written using kana alone Source: edict, searchable on jisho.org It seems only しまう and 仕舞う are in common use (the others being rather obscure), and even among those two, ...


3

One convenient way to manage situations like this is to combine following pieces to convey your intention: 同音【どうおん】 same reading (on- or kun-) 同訓【どうくん】 same kun-reading 異音【いおん】 different reading 同義【どうぎ】 same meaning 異義【いぎ】 different meaning 類義【るいぎ】 similar meaning 同字【どうじ】 same kanji 異字【いじ】 different kanji For example, there are 同音異義語, 同音異字語, 同字異音異義語, ...


3

EDIT : See this answer too : Difference between 見る and 観る? EDIT 2 : A very usefull link in the comments of the previous answer. http://www.bunka.go.jp/kokugo_nihongo/bunkasingi/pdf/ijidoukun_140221.pdf To be taken with a grain of salt : 見る is the most general, I think it can pretty much replace the others and it's the one you should use if you ...


2

Indeed, what is truth? The answer to your question has two parts: one very simple, and another very difficult. Today, these three characters are used in slightly different contexts: 誠{まこと} is "sincerity," i.e. a basis in a true heart (see below). Such a judgmental word is not heard much these days in Japanese or English. In fact, you most often hear it in ...


2

This is very simple. 観る means "to watch" - TV, theatre, whatever else action. 見る means "to see" - to see the sea, for example.


1

This is not a very answerable question because of the range of writing styles encompassed in written Japanese. In everyday writing like what you see in your neighborhood bulletin or light novel, it might not get more complicated than 今日【こんにち】は vs. 今日【きょう】は. But in fact if you are willing to look up a kanji in your favorite EDICT software and look at all of ...


1

I located another version of the poem as follows: ぬすびと        青じろい骸骨星座のよあけがた    凍えた泥の乱(らん)反射をわたり    店さきにひとつ置かれた    青磁のかめをぬすんだもの    にはかにもその長く黒い脚をやめ    二つの耳に二つの手をあて    電線のオルゴールを聴く Here 青磁のかめ = celadon pot. Thus 提婆のかめ may mean "the pot isolated like Aryadeva." Anyway, the poem is enigmatic with plenty of room for speculation including this -> ...


1

There is an official document that covers a number of these. For example: つくる 084 【作る】こしらえる。米を作る。規則を作る。新記録を作る。計画を作る。詩を作る。笑顔を作る。 会社を作る。機会を作る。組織を作る。 【造る】大きなものをこしらえる。醸造する。 船を造る。庭園を造る。宅地を造る。道路を造る。数寄屋造りの家。酒を造る。 【創る*】独創性のあるものを生み出す。 新しい文化を創(作)る。画期的な商品を創(作)り出す。 * 一般的には「創る」の代わりに「作る」と表記しても差し支えないが,事柄の「独創性」を 明確に示したい場合には,「創る」を用いる。 Or this, which is ...


1

I'm not sure if this answers your question exactly, but here are the examples I find interesting. 一【いち】 / 一人【ひとり】 / 一人称【いちにんしょう】 大人【おとな】 / 大人数【おおにんずう】 / 大人数人【おとなすうにん】



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