Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

As the characters clearly suggest, 大西洋 simply refers to the big Western ocean. Not much confusion there. 太平洋, however, is an adaptation of the English "Pacific" Ocean. 太平 is a word in its own right that means roughly this: "peaceful" or "tranquil," or "pacific," if you will. According to the page linked at the bottom it had previously been known as 大東海. It ...


8

If I had to try to generalize, I'd say: 下りる is used for moving downward, including a number of metaphorical or idiomatic uses 降りる is used mainly for falling back or getting out of a vehicle But I think it helps to be more specific, so I've put together a little outline with some examples: 下りる Move downward [descend, climb down, fall, fly down, land] ...


8

The interchangeability between [舟]{ふね} and [船]{ふね} , in theory, is close to non-existent. In real life, however, it is left to the judgement of each individual. Generally speaking, the more educated or well-read you are, the less interchangeable the two will become. In school, we are taught to use 舟 to refer to a small boat, usually (but not necessarily) ...


7

The nouns 早さ and 速さ are derived from the adjectival verbs 早い and 速い, which both can mean both "fast" and "early". Being derived from adjectival verbs, they are native Japanese words. On the other hand, 速度 is a Chinese-derived word, which means "speed" or "rate" (and doesn't mean "earliness"). The kanji 早 is usually used for the sense of "early" and 速 ...


6

The act of assigning kanjis to words that ignore kanji's meaning is called 当て字 (ateji), and that has a long history. According to Wikipedia article on 当て字, this was very common in the past because the language used to rely on Kanji/Hiragana boundary to help distinguish nouns, verbs, etc from particles. The article is full of great examples like 珈琲, 滅茶苦茶, and ...


5

I think 眼 and 樹 are restricted in usage: 樹{き} refers specifically to 立ち木 according to my 漢和辞典. Once you chop it down, it ceases to be a 樹. Although a standing tree can be 木 or 樹, a wooden object can only be made of 木, not 樹. I also think that perhaps 樹 might seem a bit more literary or grandiose. I've mostly seen it used to refer to very large (still ...


4

One can hear しょって used often when talking about rucksacks or backpacks. リュックサックを[背負]{しょ}って[歩]{ある}く There isn't really much difference (しょう pronunciation is from せおう anyway), though, and people use them quite interchangeably. Though, sometimes the nuance of しょう can be such that it is [迷惑]{めいわく}... However, there is one situation, when one's talking ...


3

The sense of うるおい (which is a noun) that 沢 (or 澤) has is that of abundance, as in 沢山【たくさん】, 潤沢【じゅんたく】, or 贅沢【ぜいたく】; and the sense of うるおす that it has is that of favouring or blessing, as in 恩沢【おんたく】or 恵沢【けいたく】. The sense of つや that 沢 has is that of glossiness, as in 光沢【こうたく】 or 色沢【しきたく】.


3

Check out this site for some kanji etymology. I've posted the results there. 産 : 生 (Type 2 Phonetic) birth; life + an abbreviated form of 彦 (handsome/well-formed) → (well-formed), locally grown, life-sustaining product → produce; production; local product/material (that sustains life) → one's birthplace → childbirth. 生 : SIS shows an abbreviated form (Type ...


3

I don't think タイピングすることの早さ is incorrect; it just sounds very strange, like "the speed of the act of typing" in English. I think the の is more commonly left out when dealing with 熟語, while it's more, if not completely necessary when using 単語. タイピングの速度 → "The speed of typing" (correct, but sounds a little stiff) タイピング速度 → "Typing speed" タイピング速さ → ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible