Hot answers tagged

14

The very answer to your question is why I like Japanese so much. As you noticed a same word can be written with different kanji: that is not limited to verbs. If kanji changes meaning changes too (that is especially true concerning verbs, nouns are more subject to stylistic preferences: eg. かっこいい(casual form)・恰好良い(old form)・格好いい(normal form)). In order to ...


6

かん should be 勘 meaning "sense" or "intuition", so 会話勘 meaning "sense for conversation". (Cf. 勘が戻る, a common expression meaning something like "to get back into the swing of things".)


6

I think this is actually a place where the Chinese-imported kanji obscure the usage of native Japanese words. Etymology The etymology of all these words (and 書く) is the same 和語 of かく, which has the original meaning of "scratch in" and eventually "write". Then, えをかく meant "to scratch/write a picture", which eventually became えがく. From the historical ...


6

Japanese didn't have any original letters in ancient times. Kanji was brought into Japan from China in the 3rd or 4th century. When old Japanese people adopted kanji, they called each letter as Chinese people pronounced it. While, kanji often had the meaning which matched some Japanese words, so they came to read ''山'' as やま, ''空'' as そら, ''人'' as ひと, for ...


5

愛 is the "concept" of love. 愛情 is the physical emotion that humans feel. 「情」 be can added to other things in a similar way: [感情]{かんじょう} Emotion(s) [友情]{ゆうじょう} Friendship [情熱]{じょうねつ} Passion (lit. "emotional heat") (彼は)[情]{じょう}がない (He has) no compassion/sympathy for others. See a pattern? The broader issue for you here (which I've seen ...


5

Your understanding is correct. 速い refers to one's speed and 早い refers to time. However, 早い has more uses than just meaning early. Check: How to distinguish between the meanings of "quickly", "soon" and "early" for 早く. 早く来る would mean coming quickly with the focus on getting there on time, not particularly on getting there with ...


4

I am not aware of any such analysis that looks at the full breadth of Japanese character readings. Some background first. Background detail Kanji have been used very flexibly, both historically and currently, with examples such as the historical 木乃伊【みいら】, where the spelling comes from Chinese and the reading comes from Portuguese mirra or Dutch mirre ("...


4

Almost nothing but the latter possibly reminds readers of the real 刺【とげ】 "thorn", or another reading of the kanji: 刺々【とげとげ】 "barbed". Although いらいら came from an old word いら that means "thorn", it's almost always written as 苛々 when merely means "annoyed; irritated". (But maybe more prevalent in katakana イライラ nowadays.)


4

According to Alexander Wurdow (a kind of notable author in Russia), "者/物 usually plays an auxiliary role (nominalization), and therefore most of the time it is written in kana". Does that make any sense? It's hard to translate grammatical terms for me...


4

I doubt there is an official method or list of words used to explain kanji. If there were an official method that were a lot more efficient, then regular people would probably be using it and nobody would be having problems explaining how things are spelled. Having an official list would mean one would have to memorize thousands of words, one for each ...


4

Maybe you know that to say "to take a pill" in Japanese you would say 丸薬をのむ. (I did not put the kanji of のむ intentionally). 飲む is used to say to drink. I mean, to absorb a liquid through your mouth like "to drink water, syrup, beer, ..." On the other side 呑む is used more to mean to swallow. It can be figurative or not. 涙{なみだ}を呑{の}む (to refrain one's anger),...


4

No. As 読んで and 呼んで have different accents in both standard Japanese and Kansai dialect. 呼ぶ and 呼び出す are... 呼ぶ: call someone. 呼び出す: call someone and ask him to come somewhere. They are similar, sometimes same.


4

They're mostly interchangeable. If you want to be nit-picky, 交替 is for regularly occurring changes, and 交代 is for one-time changes, but this is not a hard-set rule.


3

[大人気]{おとなげ}ない。 [大人気]{だいにんき}である。


2

The key to understanding the fist part is to know what 送り仮名 are part of the verb and not. In this case, け is part of the word. 誰向け to whom from goo辞書 む・ける【向ける】 1 その方向に正面が位置するようにする。ある方向を向かせる。「視線を―・ける」「背を―・ける」「マイクを―・ける」「怒りを他人に―・ける」 ウソ lie The word ウソ is normally used together with つく to mean the verb "lie". from goo辞書 うそ【×...


1

刺々 is read とげとげ and 苛々 and 刺々 are usually written in hiragana or katakana. いらいら means "disconcertedness, stew,and distraction etc" and it shows a one's emotion like so, for example, 私は、彼の無礼な態度にイライラした(I was stabby for his rude attitude.) とげ means spine and とげとげ means "acridly", for example, 彼の態度はトゲトゲしている(His attitude is acrid).


1

According to this answer, there are 335 音読み in modern use. Assuming that statistic is true, the probability of randomly guessing and getting it right is 1/335. But the odds improve based on other things about the kanji. There are certain phonetic components will suggest a certain reading. For example, you can bet a kanji with the component 寺 in it will be ...


1

A 来る is not an action you can perform with varying degrees of speed. It's corresponding here more to English "be here" or "appear here" rather than "walk down here", "walk up here". Although there were opinions voiced here and here that the action could be expressed in progressive form.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible