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11

ゼロ has almost 0% ambiguity (when spoken) and, only requiring katakana, is much easier to write.


11

For your particular sentence, using 五日 adverbially without に under the meaning 'fifth day of the month' is ungrammatical, so it is unambiguously 何時か. They are expressing intent to go to America eventually in the future. As Tsuyoshi Ito correctly points out below, there is still slight chance that it may be 五日 meaning 'for five days,' but this possibility is ...


11

Your example says he grew facial hair. If it's a Japanese person, I would even dare say that it unambiguously refers to a beard, since I haven't seen many moustaches recently in Japan (beside mines), while I keep seeing guys struggling to get a beard :) The unambiguous words you can use are: 顎鬚 chin beard 鼻髭 moustache 口髭 moustache 山羊髭 goatee 揉み上げ ...


10

In a Japanese context, that distinction does not matter so much, and it can be either. Since you are asking whether that Japanese word is ambiguous, I think that you are biased to English mind. It is not that the word 髭 is ambiguous; it is that a single concept in English does not match a single concept in Japanese. This is similar to fingers vs. thumbs. ...


8

From what I've read, the original meaning of "かわいい" had less to do with "cuteness", and more to do with inherent qualities such as weakness, small size, docility, etc., that engender a feeling of pity. As far as I recall, the change in meaning to "cute appearance" is fairly recent. So it could be that either "かわいそう" just hasn't caught up with the new meaning ...


8

If I had to try to generalize, I'd say: 下りる is used for moving downward, including a number of metaphorical or idiomatic uses 降りる is used mainly for falling back or getting out of a vehicle But I think it helps to be more specific, so I've put together a little outline with some examples: 下りる Move downward [descend, climb down, fall, fly down, land] ...


6

My answer builds off of rdb's answer. My understanding is that ~そう for usage of "seems" cannot be used for actual information that is apparent. I.e. you can't say "she looks cute" using そう for someone you are looking at. Though, you get on the slippery slope when you want to say something like "she sounds cute" after you get off a phone conversation. But ...


6

First of all, I do not think that people use かわいそう to mean “seemingly cute.” But I cannot pin down the reason of this. I think that it is at least partly because かわい+そう would have the same form as かわいそう meaning “pitiful.” However, I am not sure if this is the only reason. As you noticed, かわいい describes appearance. I cannot think of a context where 白そう ...


5

The historical spelling (歴史的仮名遣い) of 短い uses a じ instead of a ぢ, so this rules out the possibility of an etymological relationship between 短い and 身近.


4

について is a fixed expression meaning "regarding, concerning, ..." (here "about" also works) and derives from 就く or 付く, although it is usually written in かな.


4

Why in the world Denshi Jisho has both of those options, I don't know. If it was anywhere else, I'd just say that the katakana version is someone writing 男の子 somewhat creatively. In any case, they mean the same thing. However, の here is -not- possessive, it's a kind of adnominal thing (though it is a particle) - the phrase means 'male child' or 'boy'. You ...


3

もらいたい・いただきたい's usage is waving these days. It originally takes dative に for the marker of the agent, but people have started to use nominative as well, as a result, the situation is being more or less confusing. i.e. 父母や教師達には…考えていただきたいものだ → 父母や教師達は…考えていただきたいものだ


3

I've heard れい still being used when pronouncing phone numbers. But other than phone numbers (and maybe sports scores,) ゼロ is generally easier for listeners to pick up because it has more of a 濁音{だくおん} (voiced sound.) More analysis for this can be found on this page, as well.


3

I hear かわよさそう used frequently as a substitute for かわいそう, and sometimes its altered companion, かわよい. I presume it's very slangy and I feel perhaps a bit feminine, but it does exist nonetheless. Another workaround might be to use 可愛{かわい}らしい, which while technically different, at least approaches the intended meaning. As for when it's used, I don't think it ...


3

The first is marked 接 (short for 接続詞{せつぞくし} "conjunction"), while the second is divided into 接助 (short for 接続助詞{せつぞくじょし} "conjunctive particle") and 終助 (short for [終助詞]{しゅうじょし} "sentence-final particle"). So what's the difference? As it says, and as you can see from the examples, they are different parts of speech. The conjunction can appear at the ...


3

I think it's hard to tell since they're both read as ひげ. But comparing to Chinese, 須(simplified) 鬚(traditional) (both read as xū) is used for beard. 髭(zī) is used for moustache. If you look in the Japanese dictionary, ひげ has two kanji - 鬚 and 髭 The former corresponds to the Chinese word for beard, and the latter for moustache.


2

I'm a Japanese native speaker. It's my impression that in the aforementioned sentence 'hige' is very ambiguous, floating somewhere between beard and mustache. To be honest I don't give much thought to the difference in reading/hearing such a sentence. I don't fully agree with the idea that 'hige' is more likely to indicate mustache, although Sawa's ...


2

It's exactly what it says. If you look at the example sentences from your link I think it'll be easier to get the difference: [接]《接続助詞「けれども」から》前に述べた事柄と相反する内容を導く語。だが。しかし。「彼は頑固だ。―、話はわかる人間だ」 And the other: 1 確定の逆接条件を表し、内容の矛盾する事柄を対比的に結びつける意を表す。「言うことはりっぱだ―、することはなってない」「年はとっている―、実に活動的だ」 I've bolded relevant parts and omitted the other 2 definitions from ...


2

It's mainly down to the myriad readings of the kanji that are available. For instance Ichigo (the name you reference) may not use the same kanji as 一五 (one, five) Note: I'm not a fan of Bleach, so I wouldn't know if Ichigo was spelt in kanji or kana. Using my dictionary, I'll pull out 5 random kanji that can be read as Ichi or Go Ichi can be any of these ...


2

From a grammatical point of view I think it could be rephrased as: (私は、)父母や教師達には、もっとよく子どもの教育について、考えていただきたい{ものだ/と思う}。 -私は = I = the subject for 考えていただきたい -父母や教師たちに = for parents and teachers = the subject for 考える -もっとよく = more seriously <--- modifies 考える. -子どもの教育について = about children's education <--- modifies 考える. -考えていただきたい* = the humble form of ...


1

(This is supplementary to Chocolate's answer.) If you put everything together then we get: I would like parents and teachers to think much more about their childrens' education. Note that: いただきたい makes the sentence from the viewpoint of the writer. Parents and teachers are the topic (marked by は): that is to say, the focus of the speaker/writers ...


1

We have three words in everyday vocabulary according to dictionaries. 苺 strawberry (pitch accent in Tokyo dialect: Low-High-High) 一語 one word (LHL) 一期 a whole life (usually used in the compound word 一期一会 LHH-L(H)HH?) Also we have: 一五 one, five (when reading aloud the numbers separately). 参考 http://accent.u-biq.org/i.html



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