Tag Info

New answers tagged

6

Please note that kana is not a true syllabic script anymore. The reason for this is due to /n/. For example, take the word /sinbun/ "newspaper". If you break it into its syllables, it is sin.bun. While accents are determined by syllables in some dialects, kana--as well as Japanese speakers--segment this as si.n.bu.n. The appropriate term for this mora. ...


6

In about 2000 years ago, people in Japan were still using clay vessels and had no characters at all, while China had developed a large civilization and their own writing system, kanji. In those days, Japanese and Chinese used completely different languages, with completely different vocabulary, syllables, and grammar. In around the 1st to 4th century, kanji ...


3

You've got two distinct questions here, I'll answer them in turn. Japanese wasn't really 'influenced' by any other syllabic phonetic writing systems; instead, it turns out a syllabary is the most natural kind of phonetic writing system to create out of nothing (or out of a semantically-based system like Chinese). Of the various examples we have of people ...


-3

大和言葉(和語)の複合語造語法に則ります。音韻交替です。 The following changes may happen when forming compound words: 'e' turns into 'a' (雨宿り・金沢・船旅) 'i' turns into 'u' (くつわ・かむなぎ) 'i' turns into 'o' (木陰、木霊、最寄り) 'o' turns into 'a' (白髪・たなごころ) If the first syllable of the second word begins with an unvoiced consonant, it often becomes voiced. 連濁です。 'ts' turns into 'tz'(横綱・手綱) 'f' ...


0

This is speculation on my part, but I believe it is possible that when 運 is used to mean one's luck or fortune, it may be interpreted as "[that which is] carried". To illustrate, consider the word 運命(うんめい), meaning destiny or fate. Taking the two kanji apart, we have: 運ぶ (はこぶ) meaning to carry and 命(いのち) meaning life. So, synthesized, it would mean ...



Top 50 recent answers are included