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なんて is a colloquial variant of など. なんか is another one.


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According to Wikipedia, it would appear that there were in fact a wide range of characters used for any given sound prior to the de-facto standardization that was the creation of the Kana syllabaries (keeping in mind, of course, that at their roots the kana characters are either cursive forms of characters [ひらがな] or isolated elements of characters [カタカナ]). ...


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おてもと does refer to chopsticks but it is not "another word for chopsticks." That is, you won't say おてもとを取ってください nor 新しいおてもとを買ってこようかな. According to the source article that Chocolate's Wikipedia article mentions, the word came from a reference to "お手もと箸" (chopsticks for your personal use) in contrast to "お取り箸", which refers to chopsticks for shared dishes that ...


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校 isn't the character for "school", it's a character for "school". Here are some of the others: 塾, 学, 學, 宗, 斈, 泮, 黉, 院, 黌, ... Characters are not a neat logical mapping of one picture to one concept. In fact characters are not even Japanese, as I'm sure you know. Characters evolved over thousands of years in China. This means meanings changed, characters ...


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Well, for starters, 校 also has the meaning of "proof" (as in a proof print of something; not "proof" as in evidence) which is associated with its additional 音読み "きょう". That aside, 漢語 very strongly favors multi-character compounds. With simpler concepts it therefore makes sense to choose two characters with similar meanings to convey it, after which one of ...


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Thousands of 熟語s in Japanese are created in such a way. 岩石(がんせき) ≒ 岩(いわ) (rock) 河川(かせん) ≒ 川(かわ) (river) 絵画(かいが) ≒ 絵(え) (picture) 自己(じこ) ≒ 己(おのれ) (oneself) 身体(しんたい) ≒ 体(からだ) (body) I don't know the reason. That's how it is. EDIT: Japanese Wikipedia describes the simple reason. One kanji character was not long enough to be distinguishable with each other ...


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As evidenced by this question on oshiete, Japanese people don't really know either. The asker doesn't understand why there are subtitles being placed on screen, even for when someone like the Prime Minister is saying something in clear Japanese. The answerers agree, that they don't understand why, and put forward their best guesses. Here, too, is a ...



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