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2

I searched for your question on the net. 朝鮮民主主義人民共和国(Democratic People's Republic of Korea) is a string of 11 kanji and it is comparatively well known. 外航船舶建造融資利子補給臨時措置法 is a string of 17 kanji. It is the law about the promotion in the Japanese shipping industry. I saw this for the first time and I think it is very little known.


2

Nowadays, を exists just as the particle. You can not distinguish the pronunciation of を from that of お. Originally, を was used for an independent sound, that was /wo/ not /o/ in phonology. 男 was をとこ never おとこ, 踊る was をどる never おどる till around 9th century. But it is said that を /wo/ and お /o/ were absolutely confused by the end of 11th century. Even if a ...


5

As you know, the character 'を' is primarily or exclusively used as a postpositional particle to mark the object as in '本を読む,' '字を書く,' while 'お' is widely used as a prefix to a noun in honorific or polite expressions like 'お元気でいらっしゃいますか,' 'お越しいただく,' 'お神籤,' 'お茶' and 'お神酒,' as well as a character to indicate an ‘o’ sound such as in 'おかしい(可笑しい),' 'おとす(落とす),' ...


2

To look for a time before the word "Shinto" was used, you must look back to the Asuka period, as the question suggests. At this time, the educated term for Japanese ritual was jingi 神祗. But I would caution against thinking of this as Shinto. The formation of Shinto as a nationwide ideal for ritual, practice, and teaching, did not happen in the classical ...


4

The author, Murasaki Shikibu, is known for badmouthing a contemporary writer for writing her works with kanji "as if she was a man" (it was believed back then that the more artistical "hiragana", which was not exactly current hiragana, was more fitting for women while the more complex and more intelligent-looking kanji were for males; katakana was reserved ...


0

Take into account that 1)Japanese people history in Japanese archipelago started very recently (at the earliest in the Yayoi period) and 2) they imported writing knowledge from China even more recently. Since "Shinto" is a reading that stems from Chinese, most likely, in the same way as current "Nihon" was once read "Hi-no-moto", the original reading was ...


-4

I have no proper source to back this up, but what I've come to understand over time is that because of the respectful nature of Japanese culture, the language reflects this by not having straightforward words for these sorts of things. It's just sort of implied in context. For things like cursing, I believe people would just insult in a different way, rather ...


3

「[足利時代]{あしかがじだい}」 is just another name for 「[室町]{むろまち}時代」; There is no difference in what the two terms refer to. The former name exists because it was the 足利 family who were in control during that period (1336 - 1573). The latter is the usual name we learn in school in Japan. It is like calling 「[江戸]{えど}時代」 as 「[徳川]{とくがわ}時代」; The former is more common. ...



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