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5

Usually, a common word like kaisha will only ever be written as かいしゃ instead of 会社 in these two cases: When accomodating for young children or non-Japanese speakers who might not be able to read kanji (yet). For stylistic/typographic purposes. For example, as part of an all-hiragana name of a company on a billboard. Just another way to stand out in an ...


2

According to my dictionary, かいしゃ (hiragana) can mean either a company/corporation/workplace or a household word/universal praise. I'd stick with writing the word 会社 in kanji to be more specific and avoid any confusion. It's also good practice to get as much exposure to kanji as you can early on. It'll help you out big time when reading more advanced ...


7

I think the only character one would stumble over is い, because it looks close like a し with either a bit of dirt, or like an incomplete じ. The rest of characters are definitely legible. Two comments: き and さ are written with a gap in the curve (in handwriting). The next character I would point out would be に, which looks too much like two characters しこ. ...


4

I think learners should try to spend 99% of their time using the Japanese writing system and not romanization: Reading is a highly overlearned skill, and it takes absolutely huge amounts of practice to become literate in the Japanese writing system. Since learners have limited amounts of time, it's to their advantage to start using kana and kanji as early ...


4

I grew up saying and hearing 「ちょーな」 said by others on a daily basis. This is an expression from Nagoya dialect and 「~~してちょう(な)」 means the same thing as 「~~してほしい = "I want you to ~~"」 in Standard Japanese. The 「な」 is for emphasis and, therefore, is optional, and for extra emphasis, you can elongate the 「な」. Thus, 「[終]{お}わったらデートしてちょーなー。」 means "When ...



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