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Move on whenever you feel like you have nothing left to learn from one of them. Hiragana is the very first step to learning Japanese. Once you know it, Katakana and Kanji both become easier because you can look at how they're pronounced, plus hiragana and katakana have some similarities. Also, you get used to the effort needed to memorize an alphabet. My ...


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The font is called 「[教科書体]{きょうかしょたい}」, literally, the "Textbook Font".


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According to standard orthography (post-reform) no words are ever written with を, except names and words whose writers exercise "artistic license". But I don't think in your case it's a misspelling, rather a conscious choice of adhering to pre-reform orthography. (かつお was かつを before the spelling reform.) Opposed to new nonsense uses, like ヲタク (or ワヰン), I ...


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Officially, no; using を for anything other than the object marker is nonstandard spelling. However, it's often used informally to create a sense of archaism and/or tradition. You'll see a lot of names of washoku restaurants and ryokan and things with pre-reform spellings, and some even go so far as to include hentaigana in their signs. Some people also will ...


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Some people argue that the use of "障害者" is politically incorrect, because the kanji "害" has the meaning like "to harm". Because of this, there has been shift to "障がい", especially in media and official documents. It seems 障がい was first seen in 1990s on newspapers. On the other hand, some people think that it is oversensitive, and that the mixture of kanji and ...



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