New answers tagged

1

As a minor addendum to other answers, there is another problem with writing in kana only: reading speed. For someone who has knowledge of the relevant kanji, reading the kanji version isn't just a way around homophones and ambiguity, it is actually faster. The reading speed difference gets bigger as your reader's level goes up and the more you stick to '...


0

Yes, all Kanji characters can be replaced by hiragana, by katakana, and by a mixture of them. However, as other answers show, two sentences with Kanji may map to the same single sequence of hiragana or of katanaka. Such a sequence is understandable, but may be understood as multiple meanings. For example, in old days (probably around early 20th century), ...


0

My bad, everyone. The Wikipedia page for Tsu (kana) and Chi (kana) both say something like The dakuten forms づ, ヅ, pronounced the same as the dakuten forms of the su kana And I didn't read the "same as the dakuten forms of" part. That is, tsu becomes zu and chi becomes ji as expected.


1

Imagine the dakuten as a mark that transforms unvoiced phonemes (sounds that make up a language) to voiced phonemes. A quick-and-dirty way to tell whether a phoneme is voiced is checking whether making that sound makes you use your vocal cords or not. For example か (ka) is unvoiced, が (ga) is voiced. と (to) is unvoiced, ど (do) is voiced. You're making the ...


13

The columns (or rows) that have the same initial consonant are labeled as the first item in that column (consonant + a) followed by [行]{ぎょう}. Examples of such are あ行, か行, さ行, た行, etc. The rows (or columns) that have the same vowel sound are labeled with that vowel in hiragana (あ, い, う, え, or お) followed by [段]{だん}. Thus, the five rows are labeled as あ段, い段, ...


2

I think the majority of these are legible with no problem. But a good number of them might be difficult to work out. I think you would be safe using Hiragana with spaces, which has plenty of precedent for games. Or, you could use only the legible Kanji and replace the others with Hiragana and Katakana. Here's the same sentence with a few options: "Push ...


5

TLDR: Use at least a 9px font unless you want negative reviews. This is 美咲フォント, isn't it? Actually, it's indeed 7px per glyph plus 1px padding :) I know this font, but didn't mention it in my previous answer, because I thought you will never need this in smartphone games with LCDs with >200 dpi. 8px (7px + 1px) kanji fonts are used in some real games on ...


1

By themselves, most kanji (the glyphs) at the bottom are hard too recognize. As part of a sentence wuth some context, you can read it, but it definitely does not look nice at. I'd say 8 pixel is a bit too low. However, I recently did some hobby programming as well and found this font: PixelMPlus It's freely available and a true type font without any ...


5

Thinking of i18n as an afterthought is always a nightmare :) Well, the short answer is "yes, you can", but you need a very good reason to do so. Almost all modern games use both hiragana/katakana and kanji, unless the game is clearly targeted at kindergartners. In general, ordinary Japanese sentences can express the same thing in much smaller number of ...


1

Absolutely. In fact, many (most?) old Japanese games are like that (because storing all the necessary kanji would take too much space I assume, and maybe they were concerned about the readability just like you), e.g. Phantasy Star: I don't know if it's a common practice in modern games though. Googling スマホゲーム (smartphone game) pictures I see plenty of ...



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