Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Hiragana are used for native Japanese words, but also very commonly for kanji, even for onyomi. Readings of kanji can be split up into 3 broad types: On'yomi These are readings taken from the Chinese mainland when kanji were imported to Japan. The reason why there are so many is that kanji sometimes took readings of chinese characters from different ...


7

I don't exactly know what you mean by "translations", but kanji have different readings, on'yomi readings (which are adapted from the original Chinese) and kun'yomi readings (which have nothing to do with the Chinese reading, but map a native Japanese word to a kanji). To distinguish the "type" (on'yomi vs. kun'yomi) of these readings, the on'yomi is ...


4

僕 and ぼく 僕 is more common, but ぼく is also used in casual situation. こわれる and 壊れる 壊れる is much more common. こわれる is acceptable to use. かさ and 傘 Both are common to use. はしご and 梯子 はしご is much more common. 梯子 could be used, but it is not recommended. In general you can refer 常用漢字一覧 to find out individual kanji is common or not. If [常用漢字]{じょうようかんじ} is a list ...


8

Although it's difficult to show a formal reasoning, it could be said that reducing pointless kanji usage is undeniably an orthographic trend of post-WWII era. "Pointless" roughly means a word no longer preserves the meaning the kanji which assigned to it suggests, or in today's linguistic jargon "semantically bleached". Things like 補助動詞, including ~てください, ...


-1

A lot of those basic words are related to old expressions. See the kanji that snailboat mentioned in a comment. For example, 御座る (ござる) in おはようおざいます and 有難い (ありがたい) in ありがとう. It's hard to speak to what is a disproportionate amount. But as to why, consider that basic words like ありがとう and おはよう are learned by Japanese children at a very young age. Children ...



Top 50 recent answers are included